Why Does It Seem That RN's Hate Us and Hospitals Don't Believe In Us?? - page 14

Im a new PN grad and have been a STNA (state tested nurse assistant) for 7 years; but as a graduate it seems that RN's are threatened by PN's or feel that we don't know anything and hospitals dont... Read More

  1. by   CITCAT
    to the world wide web of nursing pollitics 101 yeah its a croc and I dont mean the shoes , The lpn has been downsized because we allowed it to happen.Different states different reg, some facilities LPNs can do assessments and hang IVS,IVPS,TPNS, it depends uon the facillities corporate policies ad procedures>I have worked wth many Rns and I dont have a problem with them becuase they know I know My Stuff and iam not to proud to ask for asssitance or advisements if in doubr let them check it out ,not all rns are self-seeking,anal rententive ,egotisical,hypomanics with a edematous cranium .You got your as we older lpns call it your baptism of fire hang in there do you job as descriped dont pi off the rns and youll be fine :spin::spin::spin::spin::spin::spin::spin:
  2. by   itsmyturn
    I had a very bad day dealing with this today as I sat in my CNA class. There is an RN student in there...don't ask why, she won't tell, but today she became upset today because she failed her written test on blood pressure skill. "I did it like they want the RNs to learn it, not like he wanted me to. What does he know, he is just an LPN, he is not even a real nurse." Well, it hurt my feelings, the rest of the LPN hopefuls and the teacher reamed her for stating it.

    I know that our scope is a lot more narrow than the RNs, but we do have to cram a lot of info in a very little time...does that not count for anything? What about the information that some of the nice RNs also teach us as we enter into the field to become a good nurse able to support those around us?

    And this girl is the same one who tells the soon-to-be CNAs that she would not be cought dead wiping someone's a@#. And, this is why for 10 yrs I have contemplated getting into this profession because rather than practice the art, they rather sling the mud then work together as a team.

    How in the world do those here who have those above you in what ever degree it may be, learn to let this slide off your shoulder so that you can continue the nursing you love to do with out regards to your title? I really want to be able to nurse without having someone around telling me I am a failure because for some reason, whether it was due to lack of money or just happy where I am for not advancing and becoming a "real" nurse as so many think they are because they have more education. In the very beginning, wasn't it all about just taking care of the poor sick fella and hope that your support got him through because you learned as you went? I don't know and I worry that all my hard work will be thrown out the window after hearing for so long that I am only an LPN and not worth more than making sure the band-aid doesn't slide off and in the end give it up because there is no happy medium and people won't let others alone.
  3. by   TheCommuter
    edited...
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Dec 3, '07
  4. by   swimmom
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    You havn't been in an RN program, so how do you know you learned "80% as much as an ADN RN in 11 mos vs 2 yrs?"

    I started as an LPN. My PN program was 2 yrs. My RN program was another 2 yrs. My prereqs were 2 years. That's a total of 6 years education.

    I am tired of some LPNs thinking that they are the same as RNs except for the pay. I was an LPN for 7 yrs and have been an RN for 5. So, I know what I'm talking about. They are not the same!

    More education generally equals more knowledge and more money.

    I don't see why there's an argument about it.

    I certainly don't think I have as much education as a BSN, nor should I expect to be paid the same.
    The reason that there is an arguement about it is because of people with attitudes like yourself. I and most of the LPNs I work with have bachelor's or master's degrees and have been working in other fields but became LPNs because they wanted to help people. I am tired of having sent one of my 60 sub acute med A patients to the hospital for very serious situations that we just do not have the equiptment to take care of in a LTC/rehab facility and having them send them back without even getting an x ray on a broken jaw, knee, femur, dislocated hip, ect. We often get in report "yes, they have an abrasion on their nose" They will agree that they have an obvious skull fracture or jaw fracture, are still having seizures every five minutes or whatever we sent them for, but will send them back with orders to wash the abrasion with soap and water. Duh, we can do that ourselves, we just don't have all (or any) of the diagnostic equiptment we need. Often when getting someone back from the hospital who was admitted, the nurse giving report does not even know what they were there for. They will call a knee replacement a fractured femur and when corrected will say they can't find anything about that. So stop treating LPNs like idiots. We have a higher caseload, no equiptment and many of us have more education than the RNs who appear not to take any sort of personal responsibility for their patients.
  5. by   swimmom
    Quote from vonxojn
    I believe that RN's are bothered by the limited scope of practice that we have. It's almost like they are having to do extra work because of our limited scope. The hospitals always piss me off. They act like we were just pulled from the streets and given an LPN license. I worked at an hospital that started me off (with experience) $13.00/hr. I stayed as long as I could but then went to a LTC facility that paid me $19.00/hr. GO FIGURE!!!! Now a days, nurses are going to the jobs that pay more rather than doing the job that they enjoy. I love hospital work but HATE the pay!!!!!!
    Out of LPN school I also didn't want to work in LTC. The first job I applied for and did a 3 days of Orientation for(they had a month long orientation) paid only $11.29 an hour, but I could get day shift. I was making almost twice as much prior to nursing school. I was willing to take it to get the experience, but then was told I had to work every other weekend, after the interviewer had told me I had to work one weekend a month and that they could work with me on which one. As a single parent of pre teens and teens, this was not possible. I left that(without picking up my three days of orientation pay, which now I know was stupid, but I felt guilty for leaving even though they lied to me about schedule). Then for $14 an hour I took care of 120 LTC patients with 2 cnas on night shift as the only nurse. Made several errors with no one to ask what to do and no experience(just paperwork, no one was harmed). 3 months later I took a job for $20 an hour, flexible schedule, with no more than 20 patients at a time, working under an RN. RN did paperwork, LPNs did meds and tx. Next job 9 months later I was nursing supervisor after working there 3 months. I won't continue with the list, but the way to find out about good nursing jobs is by taking what you can get to start. I have always found out from people I worked with. A lot of nurses and cnas work at more than one place at a time, and will recommend you if you work hard. It's not necessarily about knowledge of a knew nurse, but work ethic and kindness to the patients and other employees. :spin:
  6. by   ms_orion
    Hmmmm....RN in CNA course? Failed her blood pressure exam? PLEASE DO NOT LET THIS ONE SOUR YOUR STOMACH. She is the exception-not the rule. I am a RN (14 years) and have worked with many RN's, LPN's, CNA's. The bottom line is this: YOU decide what kind of care provider you will be. You will see good ones and bad ones....Grade your own paper and at the end of the day you can be satisfied that YOU made a difference. Hang in there.
  7. by   karen2
    Quote from copperhorset
    Hi...I just had to reply to your message. I started out as a Candy Striper a long time ago...and decided to become a nurse. I went to LPN school and I felt the same as you around some (not all RN's). My supervisor's recognized something good in me and encouraged me to go to RN school....which I did 17 years later. My experience with this issue has been this. Yes, some RN's do resent LPN's (only be because they (RN's) are ignorant). Some feel that they are "better" than LPN's because of higher education. Some resent LPN's because the scope of practice has changed a lot throughout the years allowing LPN's to do more in the clinical areas, some of which years ago, only RN's could do. Some of the RN's have forgotten what it was like for them when they first started out... Some are resentful because a lot of the RN's that have been around for a long time see that LPN's these are getting a beter wage than when the RN's first began. These reasons ARE ridiculous. Nurse's do eat their young, it is true. Some RN's like any other professional need an attitude adjustment. Shame on them. Years ago I meet someone from the nursing profession who asked me my occupation. I told her I was a nurse...she then asked me "Are you an RN or are you a nurse." Being an LPN, I took great offense to that, and told informed her very tactfully that I WAS A NURSE, AN LPN AND WAS DARNED PROUD OF IT!" She quietly walked away. I am now an RN, BSN and am an LPN Didactic and Clinical Instructor...and love it. I do NOT allow anyone, especially RN's to harass or pick on my LPN students. The only difference between the two is education. I had no idea once I entered my Bachelor's program, the width and depth of the education was entering...It opened doors and my mind to a more intense understanding of what and why they body and pathophysiology function and what to do about it. Unfortunately some RN's look down on LPN's because of this....It does not make it right. They should be grateful for LPN's as LPN's do a trendous job in our hospitals, clinics et al. In this state we have LPN-C's who are trained to perform some types of IV therapy... This is a wonderful thing for LPN's and everyone they work with. I encouraged my best friend's daughter to enroll in the LPN program which I instruct...and she's doing great, loves it, and is going to become an excellent LPN. Dear, do not let those uncaring ignorant people upset you. Be proud of yourself and who you are...an LPN. Good Luck to you in your career.

    Copperhorset, though your post may be a year old but I see what you described in your post today as a new LPN. I have to say that I totally agree with your comments and wish that many RNs can come out like you. I'm actually a BSN RN student but decided to go the LPN route for personal reasons, I'm now back pursuing my RN degree. It is true that in the RN programs, and especially the BSN students do cover a wide range of courses but in my mind that does not equate to disrespect for your fellow nurses. Like you said it is simply ignorant. I would also like to think that some LPNs chose to be LPNs because that was the only available choice to them at the time. For example the shortage of nursing educators, this has made it impossible for many who are qualified to continue after successfully completing their prereqs because of the limited seats. As you know, all state BON only approve a certain number of students per clinical instructors in clinical settings for safe practice. There's a whole list of reasons for the LPNs to have chosen this route, however, NON equate to the disrespect they endure from their fellow nurses.
    I could go on... but what cease to amaze me is to hear some of these ignorant RNs complain about how RUDE an MD is guess what the joke is on them Remember the saying "what goes around, comes around."
    Like you, I intend to treat my LPNs with great respect as "fellow nurses" when I become an RN. Thanks again for your insightful post
    Last edit by karen2 on Dec 5, '07
  8. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from karen2
    I intend to treat my LPNs with great respect as "fellow nurses" when I become an RN.
    I think it is extremely noble of you to plan to treat LPNs with "great respect" as "fellow nurses" when you start working as an RN, and I commend you for your thoughtfulness. However, it would be highly prudent to never refer to us as "my LPNs," in conversations, because we do not belong to any particular RN. We are not the property of any particular person.

    I don't ever refer to the aides with whom I work as "my CNAs." Sometimes the smallest words can make the biggest impact.
  9. by   Fiona59
    My ID tag says my name and position. I've never had a new or float RN come up and check it to see what my role is in the unit. I've worked shifts along new grad RNs, helped them out and at the end of my shift had them ask me how long I've been an RN, it's always entertaining to see their faces when they find out I'm not.

    Don't ever refer to my as "your LPN". Slavery is illegal in Canada and another human being can't own me.
  10. by   karen2
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I think it is extremely noble of you to plan to treat LPNs with "great respect" as "fellow nurses" when you start working as an RN, and I commend you for your thoughtfulness. However, it would be highly prudent to never refer to us as "my LPNs," in conversations, because we do not belong to any particular RN. We are not the property of any particular person.

    I don't ever refer to the aides with whom I work as "my CNAs." Sometimes the smallest words can make the biggest impact.
    I really think is unfair how you can draw conclusions to my posting. If you read my opening remarks carefully, I indicated that though the posting was a year old that I see the same events happening today. Again words like "my LPNs" are open to many interpretations. All I was trying to get at is to make the dehumanizing remarks I hear some RNs call LPNs, when conversing. I was just trying to make a mockery of the RNs who choose that as the best ways to address an LPN. The thread speaks for itself. And you bet I know what a prudent nurse would do in a similar situation, and that's why I ended my comments by stating that I would treat my LPNs with great respect as fellow nurses. Taking out of context, I would think "great respect" "as fellow nurses" would be what a prudent nurse would do. While making a mockery of the so called "my LPNs." Please read the thread carefully, and you will find that each and every post has its own ideas ... I hope this clears my own ideas! Making hasty conclusions to words that are open to many interpretations don't help... critically thinking!
    Last edit by karen2 on Dec 5, '07
  11. by   karen2
    Quote from Fiona59
    My ID tag says my name and position. I've never had a new or float RN come up and check it to see what my role is in the unit. I've worked shifts along new grad RNs, helped them out and at the end of my shift had them ask me how long I've been an RN, it's always entertaining to see their faces when they find out I'm not.

    Don't ever refer to my as "your LPN". Slavery is illegal in Canada and another human being can't own me.
    I have to say that I agree that my LPN is dehumanizing, I find this as a common statement when some RNs are conversing, even in public seminars to say the least. No, on here I was just making a mockery of those RNs who choose such words not meant to dehumanize anyone particular group. I guess words such as this is open to many interpretations. In order words while in my mind I know that's how LPNs are addressed, I then went further to state that I would personally treat my LPNs (noting thats what we are called) with "great respect" and as "fellow nurses." As "fellow nurses" taking in context in my mind means I would treat LPNs when I become an RN as if we there is no difference in status. I hope this clears my comments! This thread speaks for itself... sadly it happens in the real world of nursing, here in united states.
    Last edit by karen2 on Dec 5, '07
  12. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from karen2
    Making hasty conclusions to words that are open to many interpretations don't help... critically thinking!
    This entire thread is disintegrating into something very silly, IMHO.

    I did not make a hasty conclusion, and I have been following this thread rather closely throughout the course of the past 1.5 years. However, please be aware that all statements made on any public forum are subject to differing interpretations by different readers. I will reiterate that I am nobody else's LPN. Therefore, no other person will introduce me as "My LPN" without receiving at least a tactful correction from me.
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Dec 5, '07 : Reason: per request
  13. by   TheCommuter
    Closing this thread permanently, per moderator discussion. . .it has run its course after 2 years.

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