Why are LPN's so limited in job choices. - page 2

I am currently an LPN and want to become an RN. I have all of my pre-req's for the RN program, but I am in burn out and do not want to sit in the classroom anymore. Has anyone completed the RN... Read More

  1. by   Luv4LTC
    i'm another who is totally exasperated with the lack of choice. we moved to co from ga 2yrs ago. co is much less accepting of lpns. i do love ltc, but sometimes i need a break! i think there is a conspiracy. in the last few years i've noticed a trend, first off, pn and rn programs have added more classes (= more $$$) required for graduation. they no longer accept previous college credits past certain time limits, and those limits are narrowing (= more $$$ to retake classes). in co you must be "iv certified" for certain jobs (= a several week course and more $$$). certain states do not recognize on-line degrees forcing us to go to pricier campuses (= more $$$). someone is getting rich at our expense! there is such a shortage in this state, and they are shutting out lpns?!? is there anyone in authority anywhere who cares about any of this?!? i want my rn so bad!!! does anyone know if there is financial aide for on-line? i'm pretty sure co recognizes on-line, but i just can't afford it right now.
  2. by   TheCommuter
    Why are LPNs so limited in job choices?
    Limited scope of practice = Limited job choices
  3. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Luv4LTC
    We moved to CO from GA 2yrs ago. CO is much less accepting of LPNs.
    As a rule of thumb, the Southeastern states (Georgia, Texas, Tennessee, etc) tend to be very receptive to LPNs and, therefore, have significantly wider LPN scopes of practice than some Western states such as Colorado and California. Therefore, a state like Colorado will be less accepting of LPNs.

    You have also mentioned the trend of nursing schools adding more classes and requirements. Since there are so many applicants, the schools need an effective way to weed out much of the competition. Since not everyone is willing to retake classes or take on additional courses, this weeds out the number of qualified students who get to apply.
  4. by   General E. Speaking, RN
    Quote from TheCommuter
    As a rule of thumb, the Southeastern states (Georgia, Texas, Tennessee, etc) tend to be very receptive to LPNs and, therefore, have significantly wider LPN scopes of practice than some Western states such as Colorado and California. Therefore, a state like Colorado will be less accepting of LPNs.

    You have also mentioned the trend of nursing schools adding more classes and requirements. Since there are so many applicants, the schools need an effective way to weed out much of the competition. Since not everyone is willing to retake classes or take on additional courses, this weeds out the number of qualified students who get to apply.
    I've heard that about other states. Our LVN scope in Texas is pretty broad. I think if it had been more limiting I probably wouldn't have waited 14 yrs to go back to school.
  5. by   BigB
    Quote from kriso
    I've heard that about other states. Our LVN scope in Texas is pretty broad. I think if it had been more limiting I probably wouldn't have waited 14 yrs to go back to school.
    In Northern California the LVN's have our hands tied. We are called "glorifed CNA's" for a reason here. We can do little more than push pills and its a shame. We have been phased out of the acute hospitals and our only refuge is nursing homes. If you happen to live near Sacramento or Soladad, CA you can work as an LVN/MTA.. the best deal going at the moment.
  6. by   nurse2bmom
    In case you are interested, the VA hospitals seem to have a lot of openings in Northern California. They have great benefits and competitive pay. I really want to get in to the VA hospital, but, there is not a facility close enough to me that is hiring. (SoCal)
  7. by   BigB
    I had zero luck searching the VA website for a job a couple years back...will take a peek at what they offer these days.

    update: just did a search for VA lvn jobs within 50 miles of my house.
    Search result = big fat 0 !
    Last edit by BigB on Apr 27, '07
  8. by   General E. Speaking, RN
    Wow, I feel for y'all. LVNs are a big part of our healthcare system and it is a shame that our potential isn't utilized. We are capable of critical thinking and challenges. LVNs at my hospital take the same load as the RNs with few limitations. For me, I chose to become an RN not only for the increase in salary and more opportunity but for personal satisfaction as well.

    Good luck in the job search!
  9. by   nurse2bmom
    Did you actually look at the www.va.gov website? Healthcare careers? Actually, Martinez and Redding are the only ones right now, but, you must be in the same situation as me, they are not close enough. When I lived in San Diego, I did my clinicals there and they are hiring, but, I no longer live there. Now, in my area they seem to use mostly outside contracting for their LVN employment, no VA jobs. So, I'm not driving 1 1/2 hours without traffic to work. Oh well. Just a couple of weeks ago they had all kinds in the San Jose and Sacramento areas. If you are interested, I would definately keep my eye on that website, cuz they are hiring....just need to wait for a position to open up.
  10. by   llamagirl25
    I totally agree with all of you as far as the limited scope there is out there for LPNs. I have been an LPN for 27 years. I have worked with MR children, psychiatric cases in group homes, at a state hospital and LTC. I am currently working in LTC on an Alzheimer's Unit and I love it. The problem is there is no room for advancement. I know I am capable of doing more than pushing pills. If I did go for my RN, I would educate myself out of my job because we do not us RN's on our unit. Plus after 27 years, going back to school might be more challanging than I can handle. I'm no spring chicken anymore:caduceus:
  11. by   BigB
    Quote from nurse2bmom
    Did you actually look at the www.va.gov website? Healthcare careers? Actually, Martinez and Redding are the only ones right now, but, you must be in the same situation as me, they are not close enough. When I lived in San Diego, I did my clinicals there and they are hiring, but, I no longer live there. Now, in my area they seem to use mostly outside contracting for their LVN employment, no VA jobs. So, I'm not driving 1 1/2 hours without traffic to work. Oh well. Just a couple of weeks ago they had all kinds in the San Jose and Sacramento areas. If you are interested, I would definately keep my eye on that website, cuz they are hiring....just need to wait for a position to open up.
    Yes, I looked at the site. Redding and martinez are way to far. I will keep my eye on the site though.
  12. by   Fiona59
    I often feel that I am limited only because the RN's are represented by a much stronger union and professional governing body than LPNs in my province. But having said that, the LPNs in my province work far further to full scope level than in many other provinces.

    IV meds and starts are practised by PNs in most rural health authorities. Nobody with any nursing license gets to push IV drugs on the floors, its a skill restricted to ICUs in my hospital. Even Psych. RNs don't do IV starts because its not used in their line of nursing.

    Just look at how large and strong RN professional bodies are in your area and then look at how limited you percieve your practice to be.
  13. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Fiona59
    I often feel that I am limited only because the RN's are represented by a much stronger union and professional governing body than LPNs in my province. But having said that, the LPNs in my province work far further to full scope level than in many other provinces.

    IV meds and starts are practised by PNs in most rural health authorities. Nobody with any nursing license gets to push IV drugs on the floors, its a skill restricted to ICUs in my hospital. Even Psych. RNs don't do IV starts because its not used in their line of nursing.

    Just look at how large and strong RN professional bodies are in your area and then look at how limited you percieve your practice to be.
    That is true in my state as well. The nursing associations for the RN are much stronger for them than the LPN associations are for us. It is felt that we are not considered to be nurses, or 'not nurse enough' for others. But, I am a proud LPN, regardless of what. I have thought on several occasions that (and this was based on what others felt more than myself), that maybe I should become an RN...but my spirit says "NO"...because it wouldn't really do anything for me as a person. I wouldn't be satisfied. When the patient says to me "Thank you", that means more to me than any degree or accolades that higher education would give me. A client that is afraid, sick and confused really doesn't care about my title; and those that claim to do it because society has made them believe that more is better. They want a person who knows what is wrong, can give a simple explanation, treat them and make them comfortable. I am in the middle of the chain, I can do what the nursing assistant does, and have the knowledge of the RN, yet, have the time to deal with them. So, no, they have not limited me; they have given me time to learn and care without the hassle.

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