Tired of Hearing the One Year Experience Required Line!! - page 3

So like many of you on here I am a new graduate seeking that ever so hard to get 1st job!! But if I hear the You need one year of experience line again I just might lose my mind!! LOL I mean one guy... Read More

  1. Visit  simonemesina profile page
    3
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    This is why I feel nursing school should mandate experience in nursing as a requirement to enter the program. No one should be allowed to enter a LPN program without having worked for a year as a CNA. And make a year of LPN experience a mandatory requirement to enter any RN program. The cumulative knowledge would make the new grad at every level a better nurse and would eliminate having new grads with zero experience.
    I have to disagree with this. I worked 8 years in a small ER soaking up anything and everything any of my RN's or Dr's would teach me. Granted I have no "hands on" experience, I can successfully walk through chest tubes, full codes, trauma codes, cardiac protocols, and stroke protocols. I know "theoretically" how to cath a pt, start and IV, place a NG tube, and a PICC line. I spent 2 years in a large facility working in the Education Department, TEACHING incoming staff hospital specific protocols and leading their PBDS classes. I've assisted with teaching ACLS and PALS and I'm a CPR Instructor. I know more about nursing than most of the CNA's I know. I've helped where I can during most everything and anything that came in to "my" ER. I know how to read a basic EKG and most lab results. I've had to deal with families during a code, after a pt passes, and pretty much anytime they are scared, confused, or just plain don't know what's going on. Even so, I don't have a CNA or a LPN, so does that make me less deserving of a spot in school? No.
    anie10, cchezem15, and joanna73 like this.
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  3. Visit  mschrisRN profile page
    1
    Another avenue to investigate is Long Term Acute Care (LTACH). I graduated in May 2011 and couldn't find a job; I kept hearing "We love your personality and we'd love to have you, but we only hire with one year experience." I finally happened upon an LTACH in my city that will hire new grads and give them orientation/training on the floor. I won't lie, it's grueling work, but you won't find any better experience. I have experience with vented patients, chronic trachs, vent weans, paraplegics/quads, s/p CVA/STEMI/NSTEMI, PEGs, PICCs, chronic wounds, wound vacs, ostomy care, and we do our own phlebotomy so lots of experience with periph. sticks and IV starts. Another thing to consider is the nurse to patient ratios are much lower than they are in LTC. I am 1:3 in the ICU, 1:4 or 5 on Stepdown, and 1:6 to 8 (8 usually when I'm covering an LPN) on the Second (Complex Medical) Floor. It's not my dream job (I'm an OB girl through and through and want to get my Master's in Midwifery) but it's experience. I will have my year in January; then I'm hitting the resume' circuit again. Good luck!
    born2circulateRN likes this.
  4. Visit  tnmarie profile page
    2
    Quote from Cold Stethoscope
    Before I'd consider applying to a known terrible place to work, I'd consider relocating somewhere jobs were more numerous, if at all possible, as the poster above suggested.
    I applied for jobs across several states and not just over the internet. I drove to various cities and stayed in town applying for jobs. I don't know anyone else had a similar experience, but I didn't want to sign a lease without a job but employers didn't want to hire you without a local address (kind of like the inability to get a job with out experience conundrum). I was also told from a friend in HR that a lot of time employers don't want to fool with out of state references when they have numerous applicants in state so they just toss your application in the discard pile.

    You should definitely try relocation if you can swing it, but beware that it can add more obstacles in many cases.
    anie10 and Cold Stethoscope like this.
  5. Visit  MalzANurse25 profile page
    0
    Just a heads up but Employers dont consider PCT or CNA jobs as experience so keep looking dont give up!!! And from some stories Ive heard from classmates its sometimes even harder to get those jobs because you will get questions like "what if a nursing job comes along are you going to leave this position?" So its risky but I guess you gotta do what you gotta do to get a job! GOOD LUCK!!
    Last edit by MalzANurse25 on Aug 30, '12
  6. Visit  MalzANurse25 profile page
    0
    I hear what your saying but unfortunately these do not count for experience in the next level field. CNA work doest count for LPN experience and sadly LPN experience doesnt count for RN experience. There are plenty of my classmates that were CNAs and PCTs before graduating and they are having just as hard a time as those of us who never worked in healthcare.
  7. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    0
    Quote from MalzANurse25
    Just a heads up Employers dont consider PCT or CNA jobs as experience so keep looking dont give up!!! And from some stories Ive heard from classmates its sometimes even harder to get those jobs because you will get questions like "what if a nursing job comes along are you going to leave this position?" So its risky but I guess you gotta do what you gotta do to get a job! GOOD LUCK!!
    They don't consider it actual nursing experience, of course, but being a former aide as a new grad IS a big help. Many, many hospitals will hire former NAs before they hire from the outside. When I worked at the hospital, my unit was forced to post all RN openings to the public per policy. But nine times out of ten this was just a formality and the job had long been promised to an aide who had just graduated from nursing school.
  8. Visit  MalzANurse25 profile page
    0
    I really think it just goes back to my original post that its not what you know but who you know. Because by working somewhere and knowing hiring managers that may give you that chance you have a better shot at getting a job. So I guess essentially being in healthcare already does have its advantages! Guess I gotta go find some DON friends LOL
  9. Visit  Kamel Dancer profile page
    3
    You don't have to be a new grad to hear the same stupid question. I have been an RN for 22 years. Took 3 years off and was told you haven't worked in the hospital for 1 year in the last 3 so I am so sorry I am unable to help you. All I can say to the LVN an LPN is continue to educate yourself. ACLS, medicine or surgery classes, not for the certificate but for you resume. Remember you have to stand out from all the other people that graduated in you class before you and after you. Try working in a clinic, SNF or assisted living. Take a smaller wage or volunteer. This looks like you are still out there pursuing your ambitions. Work as a CNA in a hospital until someone sees that you are terrific. But don't give up. Try dialysis. You get to use your assessment skills and stick needles. Draw blood and chart. Monitor patients and if you have the right RN she will help you develop a sense of acuity for your patients. Also you are able to keep up with vaccinations for patients and have the need to know the patients information. Which gives you the right to read the History and physical from the MD. This helps you develop and remember your medical terminology. I once was an LVN and 2 years later became an RN. I am now 60 years old. I started this process when I was 36 years old. I had many strikes against me but I did what I outlined above and received many job offers. The last thing I would like to advise you is to continue to the next level. When you are trained in the hospital stay in the hospital. Now the market is so flooded with nurses that only the best brown noses remain in the hospitals. That doesn't mean the are the best for the position that just means they know how to play the game. ME?? I couldn't play the game. I have too much integrity.
    tnmarie, NursieNurseLPN, and anie10 like this.
  10. Visit  Catch22Personified profile page
    2
    I have my "one year of experience" too bad it's in LTC so it doesn't even count in hospitals. Now I get "We aren't hiring new grads". Apparently a new grad is someone with 0-2 years experience. I can land an interview sadly only because of WHO I know, not WHAT I earned. Unfortunately I'm running out of people in my network to ask.

    I graduated in 2010, just say you want someone who has 39507329016703967 years of experience and is willing to work minimum wage already you cheap pricks.
    MalzANurse25 and cindirella3 like this.
  11. Visit  Radnurse54 profile page
    4
    This is exactly why I am a big fan of nursing changing to fit a model more like physicians, where students actually do an internship or residency in an area for the last year of their training. Then when nurses actually go out into the "big wide world" they already have their first year of experience under their belt.
  12. Visit  CapeCodMermaid profile page
    2
    Quote from Radnurse54
    This is exactly why I am a big fan of nursing changing to fit a model more like physicians, where students actually do an internship or residency in an area for the last year of their training. Then when nurses actually go out into the "big wide world" they already have their first year of experience under their belt.
    It's called Hospital Based School of Nursing and they are being phased out in favor of BSN programs where the clinical time is limited.
    tnmarie and cindirella3 like this.
  13. Visit  wish_me_luck profile page
    0
    the reason I think there are LPN positions to be had here is because there's only like one actual LPN school here and one trade school that does LPN training. That, I think, is for my whole area. I could be wrong. But yeah, there's positions for LPNs here. Now, RNs, there's like at least five programs I can think of off hand.
  14. Visit  SmilingDown profile page
    1
    Unfortunately this happened to me five years ago when I first graduated. Lucky for me though the home health agency policies weren't strict yet about the one year experience. However, after I got my one year experience I still couldn't go anywhere because all I had was home health. Even now after 5 years of home health I still can't go anywhere but home health and even then I still can't find a job. It is a vicious cycle but just keep at it. Good Luck to all of us!
    tnmarie likes this.


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