Tired of being treated like we are less than a nurse because we are not RNs!! - page 3

by misscutiecute2010 4,197 Views | 27 Comments

So I dont mean to beat this dead hoarse again. But I am getting so tierd of the RN vs LPN. Its driving me crazy.... Read More


  1. 4
    I'm starting LPN school soon and I am excited. I don't care if people say I am not going to be a real nurse because I am. Real classes that will lead to a real job that will help real people. If everyone was required to go through the "pecking order" it wouldn't be an issue. Personally I think everyone should have to start at the CNA or LPN level and work for 2 years before becoming an RN. Maybe then people would appreciate the roles of Life's Perfect Nurses and Competent Nurse Assistants play. As far as what anyone else has to say, I have found that very few have gone in and done some research to see the real differences in an LPN and an RN aside from pay and the letters behind their name. Be proud to be an LPN. You are a member of a team that cares for people who can't do it themselves, a healthcare professional, A NURSE!
    AheleneLPN, Bess87, Fiona59, and 1 other like this.
  2. 4
    Haha...Licensed Pill Nurse. Never heard of that one. It's actually funny. When I first became an LPN I will admit that I was a bit ashamed that I wasn't a "Real Nurse".

    Now, as I do have a bit of experience under my belt I am perfectly content. I have no desire....NO DESIRE....to get my RN. If I did go back to school I would like to study for radiology and stop nursing altogether.
    rrlpn, ElSea, loriangel14, and 1 other like this.
  3. 3
    I left nursing for a while and came back. I've noticed a few fundamental changes that have occurred during that time and one of them is that nursing care has turned into a stratified thing, sort of like a caste system. I don't know how or why it happened, but I think nursing did this to itself. It was most likely a top-down process, though. We are so much the worse for it.

    I've noticed another encouraging thing, though. Most of the RNs who started as CNAs and/or LPNs strongly identify with their former role and advocate for those who still do the job. There are only a few I've seen post here who want to shun their former job title.
    Errin1, Fiona59, and CNAJessi like this.
  4. 4
    Quote from nursel56
    I left nursing for a while and came back. I've noticed a few fundamental changes that have occurred during that time and one of them is that nursing care has turned into a stratified thing, sort of like a caste system. I don't know how or why it happened, but I think nursing did this to itself. It was most likely a top-down process, though. We are so much the worse for it.
    I agree completely! I've been out of nursing for a few years, and was working with abused women. Coming back, I'm seeing a huge change. I used to work noc in a small community hospital, where I was the only nurse on a post-op surgical floor. Sometimes I had a CNA to help, but not always. I got charge pay and responsibilities. The only RN was the house supervisor who only came around if I stat paged her more than twice. I can't believe how LPNs are treated and looked down upon these days. But I'm still proud to be an intelligent, hard-working LPN.
    Fiona59, CNAJessi, LTCNS, and 1 other like this.
  5. 2
    Quote from skittlebear
    Haha...Licensed Pill Nurse. Never heard of that one. It's actually funny. When I first became an LPN I will admit that I was a bit ashamed that I wasn't a "Real Nurse".

    Now, as I do have a bit of experience under my belt I am perfectly content. I have no desire....NO DESIRE....to get my RN. If I did go back to school I would like to study for radiology and stop nursing altogether.
    I agree. I wish I'd just finished my Masters degree in Speech Pathology and Audiology back in 1985 instead of returning to nursing. Too late now: no $, no desire, too old, and too close to retirement.
    Fiona59 and nursel56 like this.
  6. 3
    I've gotten the LPNs aren't as good as RNs but I just let it slide off my back. I work in a large hospital practice group and we have MAs, LPNs, RNs, NPs, PAs, and Drs and I've noticed that no matter what credentials you have there is always someone "better". MAs get asked why they didn't become nurses, LPNs get asked why they didn't get their RN license, the different level RNs get asked why didn't get a higher degree, the PAs and NPs get asked why didn't become doctors, and our doctors get asked why they didn't pick a real specialty lol. So it happens regardless of what education you have; don't sweat it. Do your best and prove you're just as good as any other nurse.
    Bess87, LisaLPN7, and nursel56 like this.
  7. 0
    I totally agree with you when it comes to experience, i have worked with some RN's in my day that have a BSN but always have to go ask someone else for their expertise or they have big problems starting an IV's or any other things that they should already know. I feel that you can have all the titles in the world but if you don't have experience in the field or you are not a people person you can easily be that Nurse that everyone hates or that no one wants to work around. If you are an LPN be proud!!! If you are an RN be proud!!! If you are a CNA be proud!!! We should be proud of our accomplishments in life. I know I am. I am a CNA currently, and a pre-nursing student. I am grateful and proud of everything that I have accomplished in life no matter what people say about me.
  8. 1
    Being able to start an IV, doesn't make you a nurse, it's just a skill. Depending on where you work, years could pass and you might never start one. The patients condition also determines the ease of the start
    loriangel14 likes this.


Top