Patient asked me what an IV med was for..i didnt know - page 5

by NursingBro 6,751 Views | 54 Comments

I am a new grad LVN and a IV med was scheduled for a patient. The patient asked me what is the IV med for and I did not know. She also asked why does she need to have this? and Do you know why she has it? She kept bombarding... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Mayjoyarceo

    I just wanna ask who did u get your certification for IV? I just passed my pn exam and j wanted to inquire about certification. Thank you in advance.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    My job allowed me to get Iv certified. I've been at my current employer for 15 years. But the pharmacy your facility is with may do Iv certification classes as well. Good luck.
  2. 3
    Quote from Fiona59
    IV meds are covered under the basic education here. Oral antibiotics and IV usually have the same names.

    What's wrong with asking why this basic skill isn't is an nurse's eduction?
    abatacept was the IV med and I did not know what it was for but its nice to know there are nurses like yourself that know every single med that will ever be given to any patient.

    I am sure when I am 50+ years old I will know many medications. I am just starting my career and I am learning so much.
    kayak007, netglow, and psu_213 like this.
  3. 4
    Quote from NursingBro
    Thanks for the tips!

    Today I looked up the meds I didn't know in the mars and wrote them down on a brain sheet i have for each patient. There was 3 meds I did not know out of all of them. I just read everything about them before administering.
    Just remember-all the nurses here that are reading you the riot act for not knowing were once new themselves. They need to take a step back and look at how they were when they were new. I'm sure they didn't know everything either(even though they like to think they did).
    kayak007, LTCNS, NursingBro, and 1 other like this.
  4. 0
    Quote from Fiona59
    IV meds are covered under the basic education here. Oral antibiotics and IV usually have the same names.

    What's wrong with asking why this basic skill isn't is an nurse's eduction?
    It was part of the nurse's education but not relevant to the OP's question.The OP has been told it is good practice to familiarize his/herself with all of each patients meds even those he/she is not responsible for administering. It takes an inexperienced nurse (RN and LPN) awhile to learn to put together the big picture.The RN who hung the med is responsible for it-educating the patient,checking for allergies and possible interactions,not the LPN in this case.The LPN is responsible for checking allergies,possible interactions between the meds he/she is adminstering and that does include the IV.We have made that clear. I don't remember the OP telling us what the med was-there are many many more seen on med surg then just antibiotics.
  5. 0
    [QUOTE=NursingBro;7239779]abatacept was the IV med and I did not know what it was for but its nice to know there are nurses like yourself that know every single med that will ever be given to any patient.

    IQUOTE] I stand corrected.I didn't know what it was until I looked it up and saw the brand name.It's Orencia,I've seen the commercials,it's for RA.I think it's highly doubtful the patient really did not know what it was or why they were receiving it. OP-are you using an electronic MAR? there should be a symbol next to each med that you can hover over to see it's description.
  6. 0
    No we still use paper mars. The only thing electronic we have is the supply room and the clock in and clock out system. Everything else is all documentation.

    In the mars it just says what time to give a medication and if its a critical med that requires you know the BP, pulse etc... It will give you the Doctors parameters on when to give it and when not to.

    I have heard of some nice hospitals with nice electronic charting and mars systems. Hopefully we update soon!
  7. 1
    Quote from Fiona59
    IV meds are covered under the basic education here. Oral antibiotics and IV usually have the same names.

    What's wrong with asking why this basic skill isn't is an nurse's eduction?
    OP didn't say it was an antibiotic. There are a lot of medications only routinely given IV that the OP would not have encountered in school.
    psu_213 likes this.
  8. 1
    I think the key question here is whether or not the OP was the primary nurse himself or rather in a team nursing situation with a RN as the primary. I've been in both situations.

    If I am the primary nurse, I feel I have an obligation to know every med my pt is receiving. Even if it is an IV push med that I have to get the RN charge to administer for me due to scope of practice.

    If I am working in a team nursing model it may be a different situation. As a LPN in such a model, maybe I have been assigned to pass all the PO and injectable meds to every pt on the unit. Maybe I've been assigned to do all the dressing changes. It's not really "my" pt in the same sense as when I am the primary nurse. If I'm not the primary nurse, I don't necessarily see the need to know the details of meds I'm not giving.
    netglow likes this.
  9. 3
    Quote from NursingBro

    abatacept was the IV med and I did not know what it was for but its nice to know there are nurses like yourself that know every single med that will ever be given to any patient.

    I am sure when I am 50+ years old I will know many medications. I am just starting my career and I am learning so much.
    Perfect! That is exactly the right response. Then when you turn 50, all the meds you learned will be helpful, but there's a whole batch of new ones coming down the pike. The learning never ends. This learning experience was so important for you because it really isn't about the med at all. Its really about nursing styles. Some eat their young and some support and encourage learning. When you meet a new insecure nurse with a question a year from now, you'll know what to do good luck!
    ethiopia, LTCNS, and psu_213 like this.
  10. 4
    Quote from NursingBro
    No we still use paper mars.
    I LOVE our system.It was tough for the Luddites among the staff but those of us who use computers at home adjusted quickly.It has cut down so much on med errors,increased the speed of the med pass (L-O-N-G in long term care) and the entire chart and the pharmacy is right at your finger tips.It's da bomb.Now if the pharmacy we use could up their game I would not have much to complain about.Well,except for that co-worker of mine who has a habit of belching and farting in our faces.
    LTCNS, Altra, NursingBro, and 1 other like this.


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