New LPN age 61

  1. I have been accepted into an LPN program beginning in January. I am only able to attend the part-time option as I have to continue working full-time as a CNA in order to have the health insurance. I will be 61 years old when I get my LPN degree. I am concerned that employers may see me as too old and I will have a difficult time finding an LPN job. Has anyone else been in a similar situation? I am located in Minnesota. Thanks!
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Sour Lemon
    The work can be physical and some employers may have concerns ...but you're already working as a CNA, so that's a huge advantage.
  4. by   Fiona59
    Legally, they can't refuse to hire you based on your age. Don't be surprised if a lot of people "interview better". That seems to be my employer's code for they are younger and cheaper labour.
  5. by   Dementia_galLPN
    In nursing school there was a wonderful 60 something student who I later ran into while working as an Lpn in ltc. She is now a hospice nurse (RN). Not sure what the big deal would be with hiring a nurse a bit older. Personally I prefer working with the nurses closer to my moms age (Im35). They are mature and the wisdom they have garnered over the years as a human being are invaluable and have a lot of worth. Just my 2cents
  6. by   alliann72
    I've been an EMT since 2008 and was accepted into the LPN program in February. I'll be 48 by the time I finish my RN. I don't feel old and I worry about this very thing. Congratulations on getting into the LPN program!
  7. by   Fiona59
    Quote from alliann72
    I've been an EMT since 2008 and was accepted into the LPN program in February. I'll be 48 by the time I finish my RN. I don't feel old and I worry about this very thing. Congratulations on getting into the LPN program!
    There is a huge difference between 48 and 61. I graduated at 41 and am now 60. My body aches. At my last interview they asked if I'd be willing to commit three to five years t the unit.

    I am in a union job and have seniority. My coworkers in the same age group(and there aren't many) say the same thing. We don't interview well. It's not lack of knowledge, we work in pretty specialized units.

    So yes, I'd say really think this one out well.
  8. by   TriciaJ5
    First of all congratulations! I entered nursing school (LPN), at age 64 and graduated at 65. I've been licensed for one year. Employers can certainly see you as too old, so you just have to be persistent. I know there times when I couldn't even get an interview, because its really easy to find out the age of a candidate (Thanks Internet). But I looked at it this way; if I had the ambition and drive to become an LPN, pass the NCLEX and find work, nothing will stop me. I've been hired twice, but it has been my choice not to stay in those jobs for many and various reasons. I'm still looking for the right fit. You will find a job, it may just take a bit longer. Good luck!
  9. by   Been there,done that
    I was still schlepping the hospital halls at 60. If you can perform CNA duties, you should be able to do LPN duties.
    Market yourself and network on your clinical rotations.

    Kudos to you. Let us know how it's going.
  10. by   nownser
    If you want to become an LPN, then begin school and go for it. With your experience as a CNA, you're already familiar with many of the duties of an LPN. You already "know your way" around, have "people experience", and that's a huge headstart. You'll find many of the students in your class (at least the smart ones) will look to you for guidance and leadership.
    I received my LPN 48 years ago in the Army, and have used it sporadically since then. I retired 10 years ago and moved from AZ to rural VA. After ten years of substitute teaching and working with local high school athletics, one of the coaches heard me mention that I had an LPN license. The head school nurse then called, asked me if indeed I was licensed, and told me about the shortage of substitute nurses for our school system. I have now applied for and received my VA license, completed my state school orientation, updated my CPR certification, and will begin in-school orientation in the new year. I was able to fill a need, find a job that I enjoy, and no one ever had an issue with my age of 70. Quite the contrary, they considered my age as experience.

    And for those who ask, retirement was boring!

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