LVN or RT for career choice.Confused

  1. Hi im confused which program im going to take the thing is my parents wants me to become an lvn because there are lots of jobs out there if I become an LVN.Then my other friends told me to become RT because they said it's a lot better than an lvn.Is it true?I am a people's person and I believe both program would be nice since they both interact a lot with patients and people.

    The thing is I really want to work in a Hospital and I've heard that lvn are getting phased out in the hospitals etc etc.unlike if i take RT I'll definitely work in a hospital.

    My friend is a D.O.N. in a nursing home and she told me she would give me a job right away but im not sure if I want to work in a Nursing Home.

    PLs help me which the better one for me.I have a great personality and I Believe I would want a lot of interaction with ppl.
    Last edit by mynameizjim on Nov 18, '05
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   MereSanity
    I am in school right now for my LPN and I definately want to work in a hospital. I originally wanted to be a surgical technologist but decided to go LPN because I would make more money and have more choices in case I became bored with that area (could move to another area). I would suggest you do what you WANT to do. Don't do the RT just because you will work in a hospital (make sure you will like it 10 years from now). The LPN may give you more room to work with (I am going on for my RN), and can work any area (OR, RT, whatever). But, if you won't like it it won't matter anyway. Do what will make you happy. Good luck.
  4. by   TheCommuter
    RTs who are employed in hospitals aren't paid extremely well; in fact, many earn less than $30,000 yearly in some areas.

    Many sub-acute LPNs work with ventilator-dependent patients on a daily basis and administer breathing treatments around the clock. The RT's scope of practice is limited, but the LPN's scope of practice is more open and varied. If you were to become an LPN, you could specialize in LTC sub-acute respiratory therapy and, basically, perform the same duties as an RT but posess a valuable nursing license.

    I know I am probably sounding very biased toward the LPN program. However, the education for becoming an RT is pricey. The education for becoming an LPN is pricey. Good luck with your future career plans.
  5. by   mynameizjim
    Yes Commuter I believe so.I really want to work in the hospital I think that's the only reason i want to become an RT.Becoming an LVN I know would be more open and varied plus I know there would be a lot of job openings for lvn.The thing is I know a lot of Lvn's are getting phased out in the hospital and are now working in nursing homes which I don't think I would want to do.

    One more thing If I become an LVN there will definitely a job right away for me since I mentioned my friend is D.O.N. of nursing she said she would give me a job plus my friend and some aunts are also RN'S hopefully I can make up my mind really soon.
  6. by   pedinurse05
    RT is more limited in what they do, but I disagree that they are paid low. I live in Southern California and my hospital only hires LVN's in their clinics, rehab, and dialysis. On their HR web page they list LVN wages from $13-17/hr for RT they list wages of $20-26/hr. RT is in all areas of the hospital. I think you need to decide where you want to be in the future..if you want to work in the hospital but don't want to be limited to Resp then consider an ADN program (RN). ADN programs are about the length of RT. If you think you would be happy doing RT and working in multiple areas of the hospital, then go for that. Another option is to go the LVN route and work while doing a RN bridge program. The options are there...narrow down your goals and interests. RT wages are more and they work throughout the hospital where I work...and of course this varies throughout the US. LVN's are finding it increasingly difficult to obtain hospital jobs in many areas throughout the US. Check the hospitals in your area to see how they use LV/PNs and the requirements to secure a job in this role. Some may hire LV/PNs but may only hire seasoned nurses vs new grads.
    Good Luck,
    Missy
    Last edit by pedinurse05 on Nov 18, '05
  7. by   pedinurse05
    sorry this was a duplicate post
    Last edit by pedinurse05 on Nov 18, '05
  8. by   luv4nursing
    Hey! I also considered becoming an RT in my desperation to become a nurse bc the waiting lists were so long for nursing, but they had just started the RT program at my community college so it was direct entry with no wait. Plus you can bridge over to RN from RT too in a year just like LPN to RN. I chose LPN bc I feel it more prepares me to be an RN. Also, LPN is only 1 year while RT is 2 yrs. So one year plus the bridge or 2 yrs plus the bridge. Im glad I chose LPN but its definitely a personal choice!

    I will say that in the area I live they dont hire LPNs often in the hospital and when they do they want experienced LPNS, not new grads. Plus the hospital pay is lowwwww. Im currently working in peds home health getting paid pretty well and love it. I may try to get a hospital job later even part time just to keep my skills up to par, or I may just wait till I get my RN and Ill relearn them in clinicals. Im probably going to go to the RN program next January, and the cool thing is my comm. college put it online so it will be easy to work full time and go to school, especially in home health bc there is lots of down time so you can study at work. My other option is Excelsior College online but Im a little hesistant since Im not working in a clinical setting, I dont know if I would be ready for the CPNE (3 day clinical exam at the end that determines if u graduate). good luck to you!
  9. by   mynameizjim
    Thank you all. I am still currently looking for the good side and bad side of both careers but I have a good feeling that nursing is for me, I love interaction with parents and I've heard when I talked to the director of the Respiratory Therapist that RT are on their own in the hospitals.They walk around etc and nurses are in a small group which is good since I am very talkative.Hopefully I'll Decide what I want to do really soon.
  10. by   HappyJaxRN
    Quote from griddleboy
    Hi im confused which program im going to take the thing is my parents wants me to become an lvn because there are lots of jobs out there if I become an LVN.Then my other friends told me to become RT because they said it's a lot better than an lvn.Is it true?I am a people's person and I believe both program would be nice since they both interact a lot with patients and people.

    The thing is I really want to work in a Hospital and I've heard that lvn are getting phased out in the hospitals etc etc.unlike if i take RT I'll definitely work in a hospital.

    My friend is a D.O.N. in a nursing home and she told me she would give me a job right away but im not sure if I want to work in a Nursing Home.

    PLs help me which the better one for me.I have a great personality and I Believe I would want a lot of interaction with ppl.
    It really depends on what you want. I know more RT's that go back to school to become RN's than I know nurses to become RT's. In fact, I don't know any nurses (LPN's or RN's) that became an RT. I would think the reason for the shift from RT to RN is because there isn't much of a variety that you can do and not very much upwards mobility. Plus, if you get your LPN (LVN) and want to advance your career, you can. Become an RN and work in all kinds of different places. Hope that helps.
  11. by   TheCommuter
    Griddleboy: Be aware that LPNs aren't paid very well in hospitals. After all, money is an important issue when considering where you want to work. In my area, LVNs are paid between $14-$18 hourly in major hospitals. However, LVNs in subacute or LTC are paid between $18-$24 hourly. Also, subacute LVNs work with ventilator-dependent patients on a daily basis and give breathing treatments every 4 hours.

    I agree with the previous poster that said many RTs usually end up going to nursing school to eventually become nurses, whereas nurses never return to school to become RTs.
  12. by   TheCommuter
    Perhaps you may wish to check out the 'Pulmonary Nursing' forum to see if it interests you. Pulmonary nurses specialize in providing nursing care for diseases of the respiratory tract.
  13. by   mynameizjim
    One Thing im having a hard time choosing which career choice I want is because 2 years ago I was diagnosed with Tuberculosis and it was very tough for me.I was isolated for so long and never got out of the house for 3 months.I coughed up blood etc etc and sometimes have difficutly breathing.

    So maybe becoming an RT or even an LVN wouldn't be such a bad idea but I wanna help people just like me who suffered Lung problems as Well.
  14. by   august_snow
    in my area, rrts do very well. they make as much and sometimes more than the rn's, get great schedules and can specialize.

    like for instance, last week one of our hospitals wanted a rrt to specialize in their nicu. they wanted them to work fri & sat nights, 12hr shifts and they were going to pay them as ft employees (38k/yr).

    both are in demand, challenging, rewarding, exciting and they can go wherever you decide to take them. follow your heart and good luck!

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