Are LPN's being phased out? - page 23

by JSlovex2 70,486 Views | 232 Comments

I know people have been saying for years that everyone would need a BSN and LPN's would be a thing of the past, etc. Well, so far, where I work (a large, magnet hospital) there are still many, many nurses without a BSN -but there... Read More


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    My hospital had said, two years ago, that they would not be hiring anymore LPN's. As the LPN's quit or moved on, they would replace them with RN's. Well guess what~ we have hired several new LPN's in the last month! A couple of them are brand-new nurses, fresh out of school. I do know that most LPN's here work in LTC. Also, most of the hospitals around here are "RN only." But like I said, my hospital just hired several LPN's. There are only a precious few hospitals here that hire LPN's, however.
    andreasmom02 likes this.
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    Quote from Asystole RN
    It is out of the SOP for LPNs to push any intravenous medication or perform any form of assessment in Arizona.
    You'll see a variety of interpretations of law and facility policies across the 50 states. That's why I put the link to all 50 state boards of nursing on the bottom of my posts.
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    Quote from nursel56
    You'll see a variety of interpretations of law and facility policies across the 50 states. That's why I put the link to all 50 state boards of nursing on the bottom of my posts.
    I misread your post, I read it as a statement that there were no states that restricted the mentioned tasks.
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    Quote from Asystole RN
    It is out of the SOP for LPNs to push any intravenous medication or perform any form of assessment in Arizona.
    Has it always been out of LPN scope or has the scope changed at some point?
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    Quote from Asystole RN
    I misread your post, I read it as a statement that there were no states that restricted the mentioned tasks.
    Ha! I can barely keep ours straight. Many times people will assume that if their facility doesn't allow something, it's out of the scope of practice. Then on top of that, there are things LVNs/LPNs can do "under the direction of" a MD or RN, but even that gets fuzzy as prior to the recent glut of new RN grads, ALFs were populated with LPNs who obviously perform assessments, with the RN available but not necessarily on site at that moment.

    I finally found a great publication by Kaiser for California where they not only provided a handy chart with most nursing tasks included, they referred to which statute (Title number, etc) they derived their conclusions from.
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    Quote from anniv91106
    Has it always been out of LPN scope or has the scope changed at some point?
    Yes, although some things like the ability to hang premixed IV medications with a central line has recently been added.
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    I've found the LVN scope of practice in general to be wider than I thought or have been told / allowed to do.
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    It depends on your state, and the facility in which you work. Our LPN's cannot hang anything to a central line, flush them, or re-dress them. If you just follow your facility's policy, you will be ok.
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    I'm quite positive from your attitude, that your LPNs preferred to work with anyone but you! Respect your fellow nurses, even if you feel that they are a PITA... Those LPNS served a purpose!
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    Quote from Murse901
    I was an LPN for four years before getting my RN. I can tell you that no one ever had to "babysit" me as an LPN, and in many areas that I worked, I did the EXACT same job as the RN with the same work load, but for less pay.

    As an RN, I do not "babysit" LPN's, and wording it this way is very disrespectful. My second job is a part-time position in a VERY busy ED. About half of the staff are LPN's. When I first started, I could not tell the difference between the LPN's and RN's without looking at their name badges, because they all worked at the same level and with the same professionalism. There are some things that require an RN, such as hanging blood (takes two nurses to do anyway), and accessing central lines (rarely done unless we just can't get access, and we use IO drills if necessary). On the med/surg and specialty floors, 90% or more of what is done can be accomplished by an LPN. The remaining 10% can be covered by a good RN charge nurse.

    Are some hospitals hiring more RN's instead of LPN's? Sure.
    Are LPN's being "phased out"? Absolutely not.
    Will the fact that hospitals are hiring only RN's cause LTC's to hire only RN's? HAHAHAHA. Don't make me laugh!

    I think that my "going up through the ranks", so to speak, has given me a different outlook on the various levels of nursing, and I'm thankful for that. So many new grads over the past several years have this attitude of elitism and entitlement, even BSN grads vs. ADN grads. Guess what? LPN, LVN, RPN, ADN RN, BSN RN. We're all nurses.

    (Sidenote: If I could give any LPN's one piece of advice and have them take it, it would be to go back to RN school NOW. You're going to make a whole lot more money for doing the exact same job )
    Love it!!! You sound like an excellent nurse and team leader!!!
    Fiona59 likes this.


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