LPN-RN partnership in nursing-a gentle reminder - page 4

A Gentle Reminder..... Hello RN, it's me LPN. (Not JLPN..JUST an LPN.) Don't look behind you, I'm not there. Don't look down, I'm not there either. Look beside you, that's where I am. We're on... Read More

  1. by   Janice8551
    Hi all
    Leesonlpn: Unfortunately that is the typical response from alot of CNO's. With the changes in our hospital management structure, we lost a great Nursing Administrator. She was a real force behind encouraging LPN's in our hospital. I was asked to become the LPN Practice Leader about 2 years ago. Later on in August of that year I got a call from the Administrator's office asking that I come to a meeting with her. Needless to say I was a little curious and a lot ! I called the secretary back and asked what the meeting was to be about. I was told,"Oh, ------ just likes to meet with and get to know each of the practice leaders when she can." Here I was, not even in a formal role, and I was being summoned! How scary is that? However, the whole thing went wonderfully. I sit on many committees now as both the LPN and the CLPNBC representative. Especially important is the fact that we have a nursing professional practice network and all nurses, RN and LPN are encouraged to sit on it. We have a great group of people and it is on the floors that we get the support of our colleagues. I do the practice leader role on my own time. But I do get paid to come into meetings and my program manager has asked me to be formally included on the lists of members invited to meetings. Thing is, I have put my name out there. I keep on on when and where there are meetings. Look out for some of these things. Nursing Professional Practice Network, Acute Treatment Interprofessional Practice Network, Accreditation Committee, Recruitment and Retention Committee, Medical Program Breakthrough Group. These are all comittees that are inclusive of LPN's This is only because I've made it a point to get involved. The other thing is to see if HEU will help to get an Nursing Team committee going. (I know that in the present labour climate it may not be much of a priority to start one) But if you can even get a meeting room and schedule an LPN or LPN/ PCA meeting, you as a group could approach a manager or someone who you think might be supportive of you and take it from there. LPN's should be seen as a group unto themselves who work within the nursing team and are a professional entity! Just as valuable to our healthcare system as the rest of our colleagues! Go for it and if you'd like to e-mail me, please do so. GOOD LUCK!!!
  2. by   Mito
    After reading most of these posts I can clearly see the problem faced by LPN's.

    As a CNA for fourteen years I have had plenty of RN's and LPN's treat me with a less than professional attitude. I decided to either live with this situation, try to change or find other employment. I decided to enter the RN program.

    Part of the problem as I see it is in the education of future RN's . As a RN student we are not expected to get or give information from and LPN. We are expected to report off to the RN in charge of our zone. We spend a great deal of time talking about working as a team but don't really put it into practice. Alot of my fellow nursing students don't see LPN's as equals and I include myself in this group.

    If were all nurses then why are the programs very different in content and rationale. In my opinion a nurse is not a nurse they are seperate and distinct levels of education for a reason. If you as a group (LPN's) feel that you should have the same respect as a RN then you should get in a RN program and get the qualifications to back it up.

    Mito
  3. by   nur20
    Hello mito, All due respect to your goals to become an RN and i wish you much success and happiness in your chosen area.You see, i respect all human beings.Be they a waiter, garbage collector or a nurse as all humans should be.Therefore, yes i give respect and demand respect.What i'm trying to get across to you is i demand respect in my area and my scope of practice. Do you know what equation really is? Everyone doing their best in the area they have chosen. We understand the difference in the education but that is not the point.The point is to be respected in what you do and be good at it.
  4. by   micro
    I have learned the most by nurses on the floors where I have worked.......some have been RN's, some LPN's and yes, me and RN have learned so much from CNA's and UP's.................

    different job duties, maybe
    different practice acts.........similar
    different legal responsibilities....maybe

    we are all in this together.........

    or I see taco bell hiring.........

    ever heard the one about RN meaning retarded nurse.........

    just micro,
    an RN and a nurse

    nobody is ever a just.........
  5. by   live4today
    Right on Nur20! I agree with you. Everyone should be given respect regardless of what their chosen career might be. Looking down our noses at one another just because one may be a housekeeper, a teacher, a homemaker, a sanitation engineer, a CNA, LPN, or RN with one two or more certifications or degrees is TOTALLY UNCALLED FOR!

    __________________________________

    "To be a great teacher, one must first master the art of being a great pupil."
  6. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by Mito
    After reading most of these posts I can clearly see the problem faced by LPN's.

    As a CNA for fourteen years I have had plenty of RN's and LPN's treat me with a less than professional attitude. I decided to either live with this situation, try to change or find other employment. I decided to enter the RN program.

    Part of the problem as I see it is in the education of future RN's . As a RN student we are not expected to get or give information from and LPN. We are expected to report off to the RN in charge of our zone. We spend a great deal of time talking about working as a team but don't really put it into practice. Alot of my fellow nursing students don't see LPN's as equals and I include myself in this group.

    If were all nurses then why are the programs very different in content and rationale. In my opinion a nurse is not a nurse they are seperate and distinct levels of education for a reason. If you as a group (LPN's) feel that you should have the same respect as a RN then you should get in a RN program and get the qualifications to back it up.

    Mito
    Dear Mito,

    It really saddened me to see your post.. LPN are nurses...no matter whether you or your fellow student value or respect them!

    And respect should be given to anyone...no matter what title they hold. You yourself said it bothered you to be treated with disrespect...so why would you now ...not see how wrong this is for you to continue in the same practice of giving disrespect to others. All persons should be respected for their knowledge, and experinece or...just because of their humanity. To have balant disregard for another based on their station in life....doesn't speak well for your ablity to hold compassion for the least of those assigned to your care.

    I do not say you'e alone in your thinking...because as an LPN/VN ..I have met many with your same thinking. But that in no way makes it right. Should an MD reqard you with the same thinking? Should the nurse who has more education, and experience have the feel the same about you, as you do about LPN? If I were you...I would put away my elitism, until I have gained a little more experinece, and hope that some LPN who works with you, and sees you faltering...will be compassionate enough to save you from your inexperience.

    There is much I could say here...but I feel you will soon find out that putting yourself above others, will come back to haunt you one day.

    I have a wealth of experience...but I would NEVER say to anyone less experienced or less educationed than I....that they don't desire my respect unless they come up to my level!

    IMHO...I don't even think you have a real clear understanding of just how telling this statement you have made is.

    I wish you the best...
  7. by   BigC
    What an awsome post........my bedpans off to you.....wooooohoooooo.
  8. by   Mito
    I think it would be dishonest of me to say I regard LPN's as the same as RN's when it is quite clear that I don't. However, I am responding to this post as this is my point of view and yes I'm sure it is very different from yours.

    I am not concerned with how an MD or a nurse with more education treats me. I will be doing my job regardless of their attitude because their assessment of abilities doesn't mean a thing to me. If, however, they have a legitimate concern over my nursing care then I will deal with that when it happens.

    Let us hope that my job performance doesn't have to reley on one of these compassionate LPN's to save the day.

    Mito
  9. by   jaelle
    Mito....guess what? A healthcare team may include RN, LPN, CMA, CNA, Orderly, Phlebotomist, Physical Therapist, Respiratory Therapist, Housekeeper, Janitor, Admissions staff, Unit Clerk Ward Clerk, Cental stores staff, Sterile supply staff, Cook, numerous delivery people, many others, and a patient. Out of all the members of that team....guess which one is the ONLY one that matters? It isn't you, OR the LPN unfortunate enough to work with you. It's the patient. Last I checked Nursing schools WERE still teaching patient care, arent they? If you are having an attitude about irrelevant crud, don't be dim enough to think your patient isn't affected. The LPN, and the CNA will spend much more time on the average with that patient than you...the RN will. So who's most important to that patient? The person writing in their chart? Or the person who is spending time with them? I think all new RN grads should have to work total patient care for at least 6 months after graduation. Then you will understand the value of LPN's and CNA's. Do the whole job yourself first. You're an RN after all. You shouldn't need any help with the average patient load. 5-15 patients total care for a 12 hour shift. Does that sound about right all you LPN's and CNA's?

    Ann Barry RN
  10. by   BigC
    Some day Mito mark my words your going to regret that post...
  11. by   nur20
    Mito; Just to quote you;............ "I am not concerned with how an MD or a nurse with more education treats me. I will be doing my job regardless of their attitude because their assessment of abilities doesn't mean a thing to me. If, however, they have a legitimate concern over my nursing care then I will deal with that when it happens." THANK YOU FOR MAKING MY POINT!!!!!!!!!!
  12. by   Brownms46
    Yes...Mito it would be dishonest for you to express anything else than your honest view point. I encourage you to do so.

    But...first let me say...that LPN/VNs are not equal to RNs in education or scope of practice. But experience and the ability to apply the knowledge you have gain...and function as a competent practioner is the real divider. Believe it or not...but there are hundreds of LPN/VNs who could could run circles around you! Even a good CNA could make you look like a duck out of water!
    For a student nurse who hasn't even passed boards yet...I'm amazed at your arrogance!

    But it will be the SAME arrogance that will allow you to hang yourself....in the long run... if you continue to have a closed mind, feeling you know everything...without any real time experience. Nurses who hold this kind of thinking...scare me!


    Remember what goes around ...comes around...no matter how HIGH you think you have climbed! No one is an island....and you would do well to take a much humbler attitude, and try to garner as much help as possible....as an inexperienced nurse to be.

    Good Luck...because you will surely need it..


    People never cease to amazed me....
  13. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by jaelle
    Mito....guess what? A healthcare team may include RN, LPN, CMA, CNA, Orderly, Phlebotomist, Physical Therapist, Respiratory Therapist, Housekeeper, Janitor, Admissions staff, Unit Clerk Ward Clerk, Cental stores staff, Sterile supply staff, Cook, numerous delivery people, many others, and a patient. Out of all the members of that team....guess which one is the ONLY one that matters? It isn't you, OR the LPN unfortunate enough to work with you. It's the patient. Last I checked Nursing schools WERE still teaching patient care, arent they? If you are having an attitude about irrelevant crud, don't be dim enough to think your patient isn't affected. The LPN, and the CNA will spend much more time on the average with that patient than you...the RN will. So who's most important to that patient? The person writing in their chart? Or the person who is spending time with them? I think all new RN grads should have to work total patient care for at least 6 months after graduation. Then you will understand the value of LPN's and CNA's. Do the whole job yourself first. You're an RN after all. You shouldn't need any help with the average patient load. 5-15 patients total care for a 12 hour shift. Does that sound about right all you LPN's and CNA's?

    Ann Barry RN
    Ann

    She will be LUCKY to get only 5 pts. I have an friend in Canada...who recently had to leave her first job...after being TOTALLY overwhelmed by was she was forced to be responsible for! They threw her to the wolves...and thought nothing of it! She didn't last one month! And she didn't even have this young ladies attitude! Much she was a mature woman....who knew she needed...and wanted the help of others. She just didn't get it! And finally after having the nightmare of all nites...with seriously acute pts...crashing left and right...she threw in the towel...and sought out a internship here in the states.

    Unfortunately as Big C posted..."she will regret that post"


close