Lpn or Rn in Ohio

  1. I am waiting to start a lpn program in Ohio in the Fall of 07, but have been reading that hospital jobs are drying up for lpns. I really want to work in a hospital - preferrably the Cleveland Clinic. My dream job would be in pediatrics or NICU - which I assume there are no LPN jobs in those areas.

    Is there any hosptial jobs out there for lpn's in Ohio or should I just go for my RN. I already have a degree and do not have many prereqs to finish. There of course is a waiting list for the RN program.

    If I get the LPN will I be limited to nursing homes?

    Any advice would be appreciated.
    Last edit by laura4567 on Jan 18, '07
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   tookewlandy
    I would go ahead and get your LPN, why wait for the RN when you can become a nurse an then go back for your RN. I think it depends on your area on the Job opportunities, but just think of all the experience you will get as an LPN working even in a nursing home(which will give you great patient interacting skills)
  4. by   TheCommuter
    If specialized hospital units such as the NICU are part of your goals, then I would pursue that RN license. There aren't very many LPNs who are employed in the NICU, as most intensive care units are staffed primarily by RNs. Good luck with whatever decision you end up making. Whether you're an LPN or RN, nursing is a rewarding career field.
  5. by   SharkLPN
    LPN in NE Ohio here.

    I'd go for an LPN, if nothing else, it will give you an edge to get into a bridge program to obtain your RN moreso than a high school grad hoping to meet and marry Dr McDreamy on Greys Anatomy. A few of my colleages have done the LPN-RN program and didn't have to wait. Something else to remember is potentially, the facility you're working at as an LPN will help with tuition to obtain your RN - understand that you might have to commit to them for a number of years in return though.

    As far as us being phased out of hospitals? Nope. I work at one, and we're always looking for more. Plenty of hospitals are happy to have us there as adjuncts to the RNs they have in place. LPN positions are tight (or non-existent) in high specialty areas such as ICU or ER, but if you do plan on getting your RN, please consider it experience towards your eventual goal.

    Good luck to you!

    ETA - Forgot to mention; Akron Childrens Hospital does hire LPNs if you are interested in pediatrics. :wink2:
    Last edit by SharkLPN on Jan 18, '07
  6. by   L&D_2b
    Quote from laura4567
    I am waiting to start a lpn program in Ohio in the Fall of 07, but have been reading that hospital jobs are drying up for lpns. I really want to work in a hospital - preferrably the Cleveland Clinic. My dream job would be in pediatrics or NICU - which I assume there are no LPN jobs in those areas.

    Is there any hosptial jobs out there for lpn's in Ohio or should I just go for my RN. I already have a degree and do not have many prereqs to finish. There of course is a waiting list for the RN program.

    If I get the LPN will I be limited to nursing homes?

    Any advice would be appreciated.
    Laura,
    Boy, do we have a lot in common. First, I want to work in the NICU, too. I also have a previous degree, which also knocks out many of my prerequisite classes also. Although I am set to start a part time evening/weekend LPN program in March, I also have my application in to a local RN program as well. If I get into the RN program, then I will go there. Otherwise, I will be starting LPN school in March.
    If I were you, I would plan on attending LPN school in the fall. The wait lists for RN programs are years long. However, rather than sit idle, why not start working on the prerequisites you have left to take and then get your applications in for RN school? By the time you are ready for the RN program, you will only need to bridge because you will already have your LPN.
    That is just my 2 cents.
    Good luck,
    Marci
    PS, I live in Western PA, not to far from you
  7. by   luckyduck7
    I went to Marymount school of practical nursing for my Lpn, and then I went to Excelsior college for my associate degree RN. I did it in the course of 3 years, because I had all my prereq's done already. It was tough, but the money is good and it can be very rewarding if you are working in your specialty area.

    The only thing I will say, is that the transition from Lpn to Rn is tricky at first, as your coworkers get used to your new role and as you grasp the difference in what an Lpn does from what an Rn does.

    Both jobs are very important and require lotsa hard work. The stress level is high, but as I said, the rewards are many. If I could go back, and I am telling u this because I wish someone would have told me... I would just have gotten my bachelor's degree in nursing, because it would have saved me time. But it's definitely do-able, either way!

    P.s.) I work for the cleveland clinic as well, and they need tons of nurses, both lpn and rn.

    much luck 2 u!

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