Apologizing for being "just an LPN" - page 3

I havn't even started LPN school yet (will this September though!!!!) :monkeydance: and I'm finding that I'm already "apologizing" if you will for becoming "just an LPN"!! I need to stop this! ... Read More

  1. by   Fiona59
    I think it is really important for the US posters to realize that we CANADIAN PN's don't have the option of going to school for another year to become RNs. We can only bridge into the second year (if there is space) of the BScN degree, after completing the liberal arts options and a couple of nursing courses. So we are looking at four years on top of our four semesters at college to get our PN.

    Depending on the health authority that employs us we have many areas open to us and the majority of PNs who work LTC or in any area of Geriatrics are there by choice not because it's the only area hiring us.

    I'm proud to be an LPN but have no desire to go to school for my RN. I'd have to work full time for five years after graduation to pay off my loan and then I could retire.....
  2. by   nurseby07
    I have to agree, as a cna, I always seem to apologize for not being an RN. Had I not gotten in to RN school (single parent, 2 kids, mortgage, dog who chews up furniture) I would have BEGGED to be an LPN. The unfair fact of the matter is, as an RN I will make $33 an hour, my new husband, a soon to be LPN, will make $20. I'm glad that I will be able to support him through RN school because this has been one tough mother of a time for both of us! We both love nursing and I guess, responsibility too.
    But when compairing our studies he is taught "how" and I am taught "why".
    Be proud of who you are!
  3. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from nurseby07
    I have to agree, as a cna, I always seem to apologize for not being an RN. Had I not gotten in to RN school (single parent, 2 kids, mortgage, dog who chews up furniture) I would have BEGGED to be an LPN. The unfair fact of the matter is, as an RN I will make $33 an hour, my new husband, a soon to be LPN, will make $20. I'm glad that I will be able to support him through RN school because this has been one tough mother of a time for both of us! We both love nursing and I guess, responsibility too.
    But when compairing our studies he is taught "how" and I am taught "why".
    Be proud of who you are!

    That is what a friend told me about LPN training, that we are taught what with a bit of why, and the RN is taught the why. I sat for a continuing education class today for EKG interpetation that was taught on an RN level. I was able to keep up, but I did see the difference of how we were taught. Would I return back to school...no I won't, but I was pround of myself that I was able to sit amongest them and comprehend what was going on without the degree.
  4. by   rgroyer1RNBSN
    Yeah ok I was an LPN first and I find it insulting when people put them down.:angryfire
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    If anyone I know is pursuing to become an Lpn, I would ask why not become an RN,ADN.
    You and thousands of other people. :stone

    It's the individual's life to live, and whatever route to get where they want to be is up to individual to decide.
  6. by   Blessed2BeMommy
    Well, I take my NCLEX-PN on Thursday, and when I finally become an LPN, I will NOT be apologizing for it in the least!!!! I am working full time as a unit secretary right now and I have six kids and a disabled husband to support. I am going on for RN because that was always the plan.... and I will then get my BSN and my FNP... because that was always the plan. But I will never look down on LPNs or regret my time spent as one, anymore than I will look down on RNs or regret my time spent as one once I am an FNP. Some of the most amazing nurses I know are LPNs, and I have to say, the P for practical is right on. The LPNs I know who have been LPNs for years are some of the most practical, down to earth, to the point, hardworking women!
  7. by   alitak
    Quote from scholar
    If anyone I know is pursuing to become an Lpn, I would ask why not become an RN,ADN. I have no disrespect for Lpns or anything like that, I just believe the system is getting over on individuals who dont go an extra year for schooling. Your doing a lot of the tasks that rns do but getting paid 1/2 or even less than 1/2. Sacrifice, even struggle for that period of time b/c in the long run you will be rewarded.

    You may even make 2x,3x,or 4x as much being an Rn.
    Fighting through an extra year or 2 is worth it. Have better job opportunities. And be able to call your own shots if you dont like the way things are going. If u choose to stick with becoming an Lpn, dont apologize for it. Make up a short excuse of why u didn't pursue rn.
    I do not agree with your logic at all. There is such a great need, and to say that a LPN does not fill that need is crazy, and uninformed. To read what you wrote tells me a lot about you. You mentioned money foremost. Is that what true Nursing is all about? For all the LPN's out there, there is absolutely NO reason to make any excuse for why you became a LPN. Be proud of your achievement. All you LPN's out there need to teach these people how to treat you. RN's need to respect LPN's, period.. I said my piece. PEACE
  8. by   gentlegiver
    I think we all have those "When are you going to become" stories, when it gets down to it, you are a Nurse. You are there to comfort, and care for your patients. The rewards are great, so is the pain we deal with day to day. I have had many RN's tell me that they know LPN's that can dance circles around RN's. I have had them come to me for advice on a patient. Last night as I was doing a dressing change (rather complicated one) the patient asked if I was an RN. I told her I am an LPN, and that I would be the only one caring for her this night. When I had completed the dressing change, she stated I did a better, less painful, job than the nurses at the hospital. For me, reward enough!

    LPN's of the world unite! Stand tall and Proud! We are the front line in so many areas.
  9. by   gentlegiver
    When you think about it, wasn't Florence Nightingale an LPN?? Her duties certainly seem to line up with mine. She too had to fight for the respect she deserved. I refuse to be ashamed for shining her light into the darkest corners.
  10. by   Fiona59
    I'll get flamed for this, so I'm putting on the asbestos scrubs right now..

    Nursing has evolved over the centuries. Back in Flo's day, it was a job no-one wanted. The military used to take wives along to care for soldiers in Wellington's day.

    Flo made is respectable for women to take up nursing. Her training methods were practical. Skills that nurses needed. Yes, there was deference to doctors (and men in general due to the era).

    Since the '70's at least in my neck of the woods, the BScN has been the "goal". The degree nurses I work with all want to wind up in management, and a few have admitted that they don't know why they need a degree to be a bedside nurse.

    The PN graduates of today have skills that RN diplomas and hospital trained nurses of the '80s.

    It almost seemed that a vocal few in RN associations have managed to restructure the education system of several nations in the goal of a "degree holding nurse".

    Nursing today is attracting a diverse body of personnel, but I'm disturbed by the number of second degree students who never wanted to be a nurse but have found their original degrees did nothing for them in the real world. These nurses in my experience want nothing to do with bedside nursing and want to go straight into management or become a nurse educator.

    Well, the world can only use so many managers and educators. Perhaps its time to rethink the degree and reserve it for experienced nurses who want to go into management or educate other nurses in the hospital setting.

    Get's fire extinguisher ready...
  11. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Fiona59
    I'll get flamed for this, so I'm putting on the asbestos scrubs right now..

    Nursing has evolved over the centuries. Back in Flo's day, it was a job no-one wanted. The military used to take wives along to care for soldiers in Wellington's day.

    Flo made is respectable for women to take up nursing. Her training methods were practical. Skills that nurses needed. Yes, there was deference to doctors (and men in general due to the era).

    Since the '70's at least in my neck of the woods, the BScN has been the "goal". The degree nurses I work with all want to wind up in management, and a few have admitted that they don't know why they need a degree to be a bedside nurse.

    The PN graduates of today have skills that RN diplomas and hospital trained nurses of the '80s.

    It almost seemed that a vocal few in RN associations have managed to restructure the education system of several nations in the goal of a "degree holding nurse".

    Nursing today is attracting a diverse body of personnel, but I'm disturbed by the number of second degree students who never wanted to be a nurse but have found their original degrees did nothing for them in the real world. These nurses in my experience want nothing to do with bedside nursing and want to go straight into management or become a nurse educator.

    Well, the world can only use so many managers and educators. Perhaps its time to rethink the degree and reserve it for experienced nurses who want to go into management or educate other nurses in the hospital setting.

    Get's fire extinguisher ready...
    I totally agree. Nursing has opened so many doors for people to walk straight into administration without a lick of bedside experience. Most other degrees may not offer the same rate of pay that an RN can obtain. Because many of them are really turned off by the bedside, not all of them can properly advocate for the floor nurse...even the associate degree RN is not always considered by administration from what I have witnessed. And, I have to agree again that back in the days of Florence, the skills were PRACTICAL. I wouldn't say 'simple', but basic and to the point. Even the science courses were not as evolved then as they are now, and what they considered was presenting signs and symptoms and how to deal with them accordingly. It is the regulatory agencies that have ruined nursing to me with their ridiculous demands on endless paperwork (most of them lies, because most nurses don't have time to follow their own care plans or anyone else's for that matter) that can land our rumps in court if not careful.
  12. by   linzz
    I was talking to a BSN student recently and this student said, "I have no intention of doing any bedside nursing at all, when I finish this program, I am going to get my masters so that I can sit at a desk in public health."
  13. by   PedsRN-07
    I am an LPN to be :spin: ...graduating May 17.. Cannot wait.. the reason why I went the LPN way was because the RN required too many pre-reqs and it would take me too long to finish with the waiting lists, plus I have a baby and husband, and need a job asap ... After I graduate I will be working hopefully at a hospital which would pay for my RN schooling and guarantee me a position. I heard that if you are an LPN, and later become an RN, you should get paid more than the fresh starting RN, because of your LPN experience working (which is fair)... so that is a good thing.. and as an LPN we are learning more of the "technical" skills and procedures, whereas RN are learning that plus more of the "theory" side and IV's, that is basically the main difference between the 2. I am glad that I got my LPN first even though my goal in the beginning was to become an RN for sure. When I go do the LPN-RN program, My RN classes would not be as hard because I would have experience working as an LPN. I only have 2 more semesters in obtainin my RN degree which is only 8 credits per semester, that will allow me to keep working full time. I'm so excited to become an LPN in a month GOOD LUCK EVERYONE!!

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