Should I become an lpn first or just go for ASN?

  1. 0
    I live in northen Indiana. My question is, would it be beneficial for me to get my lpn before I get my RN? This way I could be getting some sort of experience while I'm getting my RN. I am ready to start a program fall 2011. All pre reqs are done. Just curious to see what everyone thinks. Thanks in advance.
  2. 28 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    The best choice would be to start out with a BSN program if at all possible. The LPN route will add time and expense to your RN journey. Go this way if you are looking to use the LPN license to enter RN school through the LPN to RN bridge option to circumvent waiting lists or rejections from RN programs. The ASN program can be more difficult to get into, but is the better alternative if you can't get into a BSN program.
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    Thank you. I am pretty much in an ASN program now. Just waiting on acceptance letter. The lady said I'm basically in. I just didn't know if getting the lpn would be better to get a job in this economy and situation. I plan to get my bsn but need to start working as soon as possible. Thanks again.
  5. 0
    New grad LPNs can have just as hard, if not harder, time getting that first job as a new grad RN, so it pretty much is equal after the wash. If you are almost in an ASN program, best not to waste time with the LPN at this point. You want to devote your time and effort to the task at hand.
  6. 0
    I agree with Caliotter. Just continue with the ASN and don't worry about LPN training. Then all your credits will transfer to a bridge program. Good Luck!
  7. 2
    I disagree with the others. Going for your LPN is a good idea. I know several people who did this and it worked out much better. I read in a previous post that an LPN that is transitioning to an RN program that has had some work experience would be hired over someone who is a new RN Grad. Usually and LPN can find work right away and you will become a more confident nurse. I live in Northern IN too as an LPN. Best too you!
    loulou55 and TracyT2011 like this.
  8. 0
    check your state requirements. You may be able to be licensed as an LPN after 2 semesters of your RN program.
  9. 0
    RN all the way. LPN pay sucks.
  10. 0
    In these trying times I see theneed to get in and out to work. So the idea of ADN vs LPN is a hard decision to determine. yes of course the best for you would be the BSN route. But it not easy to work that program and hold down a house for 4 years. I would try and get into a ADN program. It seems to be away to get out and start working and then the hospital you work at would be more apt to assist you on the from ADN to BSN as oppose to helpling you jump from LPN to BSN. It's much less expensiive or them and BTW while your working on your ASD you can try a get some of the academic requirements out of the way. I do think that the goverment is going to come up with some assist grants for nurses. I don't if they will apply to both RN and LPN. but it's woth looking into. I do think that becoming a nurse now in these days will be a much more profitable journey,with much more opportunities in the fuiture. Either way enjoy and thans for choosing nursing.
  11. 0
    Quote from caliotter3
    New grad LPNs can have just as hard, if not harder, time getting that first job as a new grad RN, so it pretty much is equal after the wash. If you are almost in an ASN program, best not to waste time with the LPN at this point. You want to devote your time and effort to the task at hand.

    I agree. I became a licensed nurse in September and I have not found a job yet. IF, and that is a huge IF, employers want LPNs they want them with several years of experience. DON'T WASTE YOUR TIME AND MONEY WITH THE LPN TRACK!!

    If I could do it all over again I think I would have just went for a BSN. I would have had more options. Now I have to wait until Fall 2011 to get into the LPN-RN bridge program.


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