From home health nursing to hospital nursing From home health nursing to hospital nursing | allnurses

LEGAL NOTICE TO THE FOLLOWING ALLNURSES SUBSCRIBERS: Pixie.RN, JustBeachyNurse, monkeyhq, duskyjewel, and LadyFree28. An Order has been issued by the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota that affects you in the case EAST COAST TEST PREP LLC v. ALLNURSES.COM, INC. Click here for more information

From home health nursing to hospital nursing

  1. 3 Hi everyone, I was curious about what everyone's thoughts were about the chances of switching from home health nursing into hospital nursing. I started my current home health/hospice job as a new grad and I plan to stay here for at least one year, so far I have worked here for about 4 months. What are your thoughts about the chances of hospitals hiring when I want to get out of home health? Does 1 year in home health count as 1 year of acute experience that hospitals require nowadays? After one year in home health, am I still eligible to apply for a new grad program or is that even worth it? Can I apply straight for an RN II position? Thank you for your feedback.
  2. 9 Comments

  3. Visit  SlightlyHumerus profile page
    #1 1
    Thanks for asking this question, Goldentea. I'm a new grad myself and I'm wondering the same. Can I add does working in home health look as good on the nurse resume as any other nursing job? The reason I'm asking is because I've noticed that suggestions for new grad employment often include phrases like 'you can always get a job in home health' or 'if all else fails and you can't get hired at a hospital… try home health' as if home health is the bottom-dweller job of nursing! Hope not.
  4. Visit  LadyT618 profile page
    #2 5
    It most certainly is not a bottom dweller position. It requires MUCH skill to perform well in it. Some states actually do not permit new grads into home health because of the acute care skills and critical thinking required to act in the home setting. I don't think it's right that people downplay home health like they do. As more hospitals release patients earlier and earlier, home health nurses must come with their A-game to keep patients home, as all 3 parties win when this happens -- patient (peace of mind), hospital and home health agency (both financially).
  5. Visit  SlightlyHumerus profile page
    #3 0
    Thank you, LadyT618. I'm glad to hear this. I'm in NC and I think since I've seen RN HH jobs with 'new grads apply here' I think I'm in the right state. My goal is oncology and I need to start somewhere!!!!! Argh!!!! So frustrated!!
  6. Visit  nurseinstinct profile page
    #4 0
    Hi Goldentea,

    Interestingly, I'm in the same spot you were in on Feb 12. I've been working at home health as a new grad for a few months now and not looking to leave for at least 1-2 years. I enjoy it but I'm curious about what you're up to now. Have you gone toward a different path in the inpatient setting or are you still with home health?
  7. Visit  Goldentea profile page
    #5 0
    Hi nurseinstinct,

    I am still working in home health. It has been a little bit more than a year since I started working at my current job, and I'm deciding to stay at least 2 years here before I start looking elsewhere...When I first started I was part time, but since February I've been switched to full time with benefits, so kind of hesitant right now to leave...
  8. Visit  RNitsmyname profile page
    #6 0
    Sadly, there is some truth to that. I started pediatric home health when I graduated thinking I could transition after a year or so. I've tried a number of times to get a hospital job, but the combo of not having my BSN and no "acute care hospital experience" has hurt me BIG TIME!
    Although it has been a good choice for my family (flexible schedule gives me more time with my kids), I would have done it differently if I could go back.
  9. Visit  Libby1987 profile page
    #7 0
    Home Health field work doesn't lead to acute inpatient but it leads to many other positions with good pay and great hours.

    It also holds the potential to allow you to practice excellent nursing. You can remain task oriented, and be very good at it, or you can reach farther and really impact lives and contribute to the whole team.
  10. Visit  jdonovan151 profile page
    #8 0
    The whole conversation about if something "counts" as something else.. is sort of moot... fact is your resume goes into a pile of resumes... IF you get an interview and interview well you have a good chance.. it's more about who you know... As far as career choices etc etc... In this day and age Home Health patients are getting sicker and more complicated AND you have little or no support like a hospital nurse does.. so as far as giving you great tools, decision making and problem soling skills... Home health will beat hospital based nursing any day. I'll be willing to bet you will eventually get the hospital job and at some point find yourself wanting to go back to home care nursing for all the reasons listed above. Seize the moment and put yourself into your present work 100% while your there.. the rest will come and remember... If your not known for your work ethic... your not working hard enough :-)
    Good Luck!
  11. Visit  barrelrcer profile page
    #9 0
    I started as a new grad in home care. After 2 years I was able to get a job in the hospital. It was frustrating because I didn't have any acute care experience so my pay was new grad pay. I took a huge pay cut to go into the hospital. And although I got the new grad pay, I didn't not get new grad orientation. I got a total of 6 shifts with a preceptor. I transitioned very well into the hospital with my home care experience! My assessment skills were very strong and I had all the basic skills needed to be successful. I did end up going back to home care because of the pay. I definitely make way more working in home care.