Nurse looked at my Facebook-HIPAA violation ? - page 3

I hope it was okay to register here as I am not a nurse however I am familiar with medical terminology because I was previously interested in the field. I suffer from depression and was recently... Read More

  1. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from BlondieMSNRN
    Well, I need my phone for Up-to-date and American Society of Hematology apps and so do my colleagues, so a blanket policy of no cellphones wouldn't work for us. I agree with a policy of no social media though.
    All the RNs where I work have their phones on them (i see nothing wrong with being available to family members) but no one uses Facebook in the clinical areas as far as I've seen and no one is texting inappropriately.
    EWWWW! Gross! You give your PERSONAL cell phone number to visitors?!
  2. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    EWWWW! Gross! You give your PERSONAL cell phone number to visitors?!
    I'm hoping she meant her family members.
  3. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Wuzzie
    I'm hoping she meant her family members.
    I hope so too.
  4. by   BlondieMSNRN
    What in God's name are you referencing? I didn't write that. Who would do that?
  5. by   BlondieMSNRN
    Quote from Wuzzie
    I'm hoping she meant her family members.
    Oh- I see now. No, of course not! I rarely even give my direct office number to patients and their family members b/c I'm rarely in my office- people can call the clinic and page me.
    The MDs, NPs, and RNs have their cell phones on their person to be able to communicate with their own family members without having to go through the front desk. Jesus.

    But w/ regard to "EWW, gross" and the first poster-- are you 10yrs old? Giving a patient's family my cell phone number wouldn't be an infection control issue, just stupid!
    Last edit by BlondieMSNRN on Jan 14
  6. by   candacern59217
    How do you even know that he looked you up? Did he contact you on Facebook or just look at your page?

    Not a violation. He didn't post your protected health info.

    Adjust your privacy settings or block him. Otherwise you can't complain about which people look you up.
  7. by   Here.I.Stand
    Quote from Meriwhen
    I'm also going to go against the general grain and say that his looking up your Facebook page is not a professional boundary issue in itself. After all, your Facebook page is information that YOU chose to make available to the public via the Internet.
    A while back I was watching on YouTube a lecture on Munchausen's by internet; one thing they touched on was the issues and ethics of looking at a parent's social media postings. The verdict in a nutshell was, with a public FB page there isn't an expectation of privacy
  8. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from BlondieMSNRN
    Oh- I see now. No, of course not! I rarely even give my direct office number to patients and their family members b/c I'm rarely in my office- people can call the clinic and page me.
    The MDs, NPs, and RNs have their cell phones on their person to be able to communicate with their own family members without having to go through the front desk. Jesus.

    But w/ regard to "EWW, gross" and the first poster-- are you 10yrs old? Giving a patient's family my cell phone number wouldn't be an infection control issue, just stupid!
    I'm the person who wrote the "EWW, gross" comment. I've had patients go to great lengths to find my personal phone number and then call me at home over and over after they've been discharged. (One guy even offered to take me on an Alaskan bush adventure.) The comment was in reference to the idea of the many inappropriate and unwanted phone calls you might get after giving the patients your personal number.

    And no, I'm not ten, although I was about five decades ago.
  9. by   Jory
    Facebook is public. If you don't want people looking at your Facebook profile, get rid of it. It's that simple.
  10. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    Police and investigative services (think taxation, criminal, insurance, boards of nursing even) employ analysts whose job includes digging into social media to look for evidence they can use. So you see, it's not only legal to snoop into publicly posted information, but it's done all the time. And most people have no idea who's looking at their posts.
  11. by   hurricanekat
    I'm not a nurse - just a student - but isn't our job to make sure that we don't miss any cues from our patients? Maybe a little on the odd side, but the OP was a patient at an inpatient facility "to get meds back on track". So many times people that need a little extra help cry out in ways that are often overlooked. Maybe this Nurse was just doing a little investigating making sure that there wasn't anything else that should be addressed (for example images of cutting or other harmful activities).
  12. by   BeckyESRN
    During nursing school, on my youth psych rotation, the staff would regularly check patient's MySpace profiles(on a desktop, because we didn't really have smart phones then!). One of the nurse's said that they realized a patient was suicidal based on the posts, patient had been denying suicidal ideation previously. So, maybe it was "work related"?

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