Nursing & Depression - page 3

While visiting in the lounge one day, we discovered that every nurse there was on an anti-depressant. I have had 'Treatment Resistant Depression' for about 20 years--as long as I've been a nurse. ... Read More

  1. by   Jen911
    Come on over, Vegas! We're either going to see the Chips on the 6th or the 7th... gotta go out and vent some nursing frustrations, you know
  2. by   LasVegasRN
    Originally posted by Jen911
    Come on over, Vegas! We're either going to see the Chips on the 6th or the 7th... gotta go out and vent some nursing frustrations, you know
    Of course, it's quite therapeutic, actually. :chuckle
  3. by   Jen911
    *ahem* yes, I'm sure it will be! oops!
  4. by   Brownms46
    ..Lord...:roll Yeah...right
  5. by   researchrabbit
    Originally posted by nightngale1998
    Some of us take enormous amounts of time (not here but I have on other threads)to research topics. Ex: researchrabbit on the definition of depression (thank you it is always good to be clear about the topic at hand).

    I do not see Toms' explanation as flip on his coping strategy. I am rather envious that it is that easy for you Tom. I do not think he is snubbing the topic either.
    While I would like to take credit for research, I work in psych, have many depressed patients, and have the criteria for depression posted in a sticky note on my computer to have it handy when people call (don't have to look at it much anymore ).

    Latest thinking on depression is that it's a chemical imbalance. It may a response to excessive or long-term stress (and, incidendentally, may show up as anxiety disorders instead of depression, depending on the person). It may be genetic.

    I don't think Tom is intentionally snubbing the topic, but I'm betting he's not a psych nurse...no offense Tom...If you can get the positive endorphins going, this will be enough for some people...exercise, music, laughter, sex; all are activities which can re-balance the neurotransmitters.

    But if you have no energy because you are in the sink of depression, with no light at the end of the tunnel, and intense mental anguish, it is VERY HARD to believe that any of these will help, thus it is almost impossible to implement these changes. And most people in the environment of the depressed person tend to say "Well, just stop it!" And I am guessing this is how most people are responding to Tom's post (because those who have been there have all heard that from someone they love). But that's not what he said...he said that what HE does.

    Medications can fill in to start the balancing act. But lifestyle changes are necessary in addition to medications in order to effect a true change. Most people -- providing they add therapy or lessen their stress or make those positive endorphin activities an essential part of life (or maybe all three! ) -- can stop the medication(s) after a while, some a very short while. But some (perhaps those with a genetic component?) may need long term medication -- OR repeat bouts of medciation -- no matter what they do.

    You have to remember, Prozac and other SSRIs really haven't been with us all that long (Paxil was the 2nd SSRI approved by FDA and it came out in the early 90s) and it is SOOOO much better than the other meds we used to have. In the 70s, my poor depressed best friend was put on (UGH) Thorazine...

    Sorry this post is so long! Guess my teacher persona kicked in today!
  6. by   LasVegasRN
    originally posted by researchrabbit
    ...if you can get the positive endorphins going, this will be enough for some people...exercise, music, laughter, sex; all are activities which can re-balance the neurotransmitters...
    now see? i've been saying this all along and you guys have been laughing at me. i just need the one activity to re-balance my neurotransmitters and....:d

    researchrabbit, you are just way too cool, girl.
  7. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by LasVegasRN

    Now see? I've been saying this all along and you guys have been laughing at me. I just need the one activity to re-balance my neurotransmitters and....

    researchrabbit, you are just way too cool, girl.
    LV... Well...if that is what it takes....more power to ya! Just don't kill em on the first nite...ya hear..!
  8. by   researchrabbit
    Originally posted by LasVegasRN


    researchrabbit, you are just way too cool, girl.
    ooooo, THANKS! I can run on a good compliment for at LEAST a week!
  9. by   adrienurse
    What came first, the chicken of the egg? Does working in the field of nursing contribute to major depressive episodes? On the other hand, are the people drawn to nursing, just depressive by nature? Maybe nurses are just especially sensitive people who are less able to resist being affected by depression? Nature vs nurture.

    I do know a lot of nurses, myself included, that suffer from depression and are on antidepressants. I also know a lot of nurses who I think can benefit from being on antidepressants. Do you know the type?: Run around reacting to everything as if it's a crisis, zero stress tolerance, unable to prioritize patient care, call you up constantly asking for you to rescue them.

    I had to take a month long leave of absence (unpaid) during the spring of 01. I was burnt out to the point that I was suicidal couldn't even take care of myself. Knowing well how ill I was, I was still treated in a very cold and abusive manner by my boss and administration. I had used up all my sick time (for a very authentic reason) and was forced to go on unemployment to pay my bills. I was forced to go in on three separate occasions (on the unit where all the nosey people wanted to know what was wrong) in order to get paperwork filled out so that I could get some money to live on. Wouldn't let me do anything by mail. Wouldn't let me come back to work gradually. "Either you're sick or you're not -- don't come back till you're well", I was told. Dignity means nothing to these people.

    Never, never want to relive that nightmare again.:stone
  10. by   researchrabbit
    Originally posted by adrienurse
    I was burnt out to the point that I was suicidal couldn't even take care of myself. Knowing well how ill I was, I was still treated in a very cold and abusive manner by my boss and administration
    I will never understand administrators...they whine about nursing shortages but don't make the workplace a healthy one. I am so sorry that happened to you. ((((((((((adrienne))))))))))))
  11. by   Alley Cat
    Wow! Guess it just doesn't get discussed around here. My suspicion is that it's a taboo subject..."She needs out>that's a cop-out" are some things I've overheard about people/staffers who have left because of emotional problems (which usually manifested themselves in major mistakes, drug usage on the job, or sudden no-shows on the job).

    What's interesting is sometimes our own response when someone tries to tell us we're depressed. My family physician has tried twice to place me on antidepressants, even though I did not score high on a written test for depression. He was basing his assessment on a passing comment rather than an actual complaint of lack of sleep. (The lack of sleep was from a small intruding bed-hopper, age 4-5 years, who's like sleeping with the character TAZ!) Anyway, after I complained about how the meds made me feel, he laid off. (It's interesting that he always had samples to give me before I actually had a script filled)

    I do have a counselor that I see when things are overwhelming; that was a reason for a major job change to begin with. My sympathies to those who do suffer from clinical depression; a cousin of mine has suffered for years with it, and I grieve for him everytime I hear he's having increased difficulties. He's warm, caring, sensitive...no, he's not a nurse, but see the similarities?

    Sometimes I think it's the gentlest souls who suffer the most. :angel2:
  12. by   mamabear
    What is your problem? Admittedly, I am somewhat biased, having been a psych nurse forever, but do you suggest to your COPD patients that they take in a movie? Maybe if all diabetics went to a comedy club and/or got laid they'd be cured?
    I am astounded that you graduated nursing school, much less passed the State Board
    Where I come from, we call people like you effing ignorant.
    Instead of writing stupid, patronizing emails, spend some time learning how to spell
  13. by   UKRNinUSA
    I just had a thought about teeituptom's response -I have heard it said that men tend to be more selfish than women - maybe he can't relate that well because he has employed all these coping mechanisms that he mentioned to stop a case of "the blues" turning into a fully fledged depression. I don't want to get the battle of the sexes going here but I believe women tend to run on empty for far too long before they realize that they have to start to look after themselves, if they ever do realize it at all. I really can't think of any women (let alone female nurses) that would allow themselves the luxury of being selfish enough to employ more than one (if even one) of Tom's coping mechanisms on a regular basis to ease stress and ward off depression.

    Researchrabbit - thanks for the info about the relationship of long term stress to depression -I though as much.

    Adrienurse - the same sort of thing happened to me a few years ago when my depression came to a head after a brain-injured patient backed me into a corner and sexually assaulted me; I got zero support from administration and zero support from the patient's doctor, who told me it was my fault. I comfort myself by reciting the law of karma - what goes around comes around(although I wish I could be around to see it)

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