Thinking about switching to LTC - whats it like?

  1. Hi, I am an RN with 7 years of critical care experience and am thinking about making a switch to LTC. I am a mom who just wants to work pool and close to home... and the nursing home is right around the corner and hiring pool RNs. I worked as a CNA in a NH years ago and rememebr that the CNA bathed the patients, and the LPNs gave out meds, but I am not sure what the RN's major roles were there. I know the basics of course but am wondering what the day to day stuff in LTC is like, and if anyone who has made the same switch, what were the big differences that they liked and didnt like. Fill me in! Thanks.
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    In LTC the patients tend to be in more stable condition and have predictable outcomes. I'm an LVN in LTC, and my RN coworkers work the cart just like the LVNs. The floor RNs pass medications, dress wounds, administer treatments, obtain blood sugars, and complete regularly scheduled assessments.

    You will likely have many more patients in LTC, but always remember that they're stable and need much less monitoring than critical care patients. In fact, making hourly rounds will be adequate. Also, you will build fulfilling relationships with your patients since they live there. You will know about their families, be familiar with their likes and dislikes, understand their little qualms, and build friendships with these people. At my facility, some residents have lived there 8 or more years.
  4. by   caliotter3
    There a many posts on allnurses.com concerning LTC, the majority of which are people venting with deep negativity. One of the biggest adjustments, for the new nurse (not necessarily you, b/c of your exp) is building a strong self morale program. You should make sure you are well-rested, healthy, and in a positive place when you start. This will help.

    You might want to give some thought to team-building techniques, b/c a lot of your job success will depend on getting good attitudes, and good efforts from your CNA's as they are doing the majority of the direct resident care. The better rapport you build w/your CNA's, (however many of them you have avail to you), the easier your job will be. Pay special attention to their efforts (explaining things to CNA's who are in nrsg school creates a good work relationship w/many), will go a long way to making your job easier.
  5. by   MommyandRN
    Thanks, I agree. I was a CNA once so I do remember that. I didlike having relationships with the patients, I think I would like it. We'll see!!
  6. by   withasmilelpn
    There are great things about working LTC. Once you get the routines down it can be pretty good if staffing isn't too bad. When you get report find out who's meds are crushed , has accu checks,TF, nebs etc. so you can coordinate their care. Also, Ask the regular nurses any tips or tricks they have giving them their care.
    I really, really love the patients. Good luck, LTC needsgood, caring nurses!
  7. by   ajaxgirl
    Quote from MommyandRN
    Hi, I am an RN with 7 years of critical care experience and am thinking about making a switch to LTC. I am a mom who just wants to work pool and close to home... and the nursing home is right around the corner and hiring pool RNs. I worked as a CNA in a NH years ago and rememebr that the CNA bathed the patients, and the LPNs gave out meds, but I am not sure what the RN's major roles were there. I know the basics of course but am wondering what the day to day stuff in LTC is like, and if anyone who has made the same switch, what were the big differences that they liked and didnt like. Fill me in! Thanks.
    I went from the OR, which I loved to casual RN in LTC. I wanted to only do nights and be home with the kids. I love it. I work 4-6 shifts a month. It works well with my family. Lots of paperwork on nights. Lots of meds on days and evenings.

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