New Grad just got a job at LTC/rehab

  1. 0
    I'm a new grad just got a job at a long term care/rehab facility. I was wondering if anyone had any advise for me as a new nurse.
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  3. 8 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Welcome! Your post has been moved to the LTC Nursing forum with the goal of increasing the number of responses to your thread. We wish you the best of luck!
  5. 2
    My advice is always the same. Expect that it will take forever to accomplish your med passes in the beginning. Do not take short cuts. Trust that you will improve as you become more familiar with your job. You will learn to provide quality care while staying on task.
    sallyrnrrt and freesia29 like this.
  6. 0
    thanks. i just finished my first shift alone as an lpn grad on a ltc hall of 22 residents and didnt get the 8am pass done until noon. at least everyone reassured me this is normal. good luck!
  7. 1
    Read your charts in your down time. Especially the history and progress notes. You will learn a lot from them. It helped me to read other nurses charting too. I learned what to chart on by reading other entries by seasoned nurses. The above post is correct in that it will take you a long time at first to get your meds out so don't let the clock make you frazzled - always one thing at a time. I've been doing this almost 20 years and I still take time to try to learn something new everyday. Respect the others that you work with.. From the housekeeping to the dietary to other nurses and CNA's. it's those that give respect that receive it. And always ask questions if you don't understand something. It's a simple thing to ask and it shows you want to do not only a good job but also get the job done the right way.

    Best of luck to you and God Bless!

    P.s. Leave work at the clock. Take time for yourself. Don't boggle your mind with it at home. It will keep you from burn out much easier!
    rose-n-arrows likes this.
  8. 1
    Quote from LoveMyBoxer99
    Read your charts in your down time. Especially the history and progress notes. You will learn a lot from them. It helped me to read other nurses charting too. I learned what to chart on by reading other entries by seasoned nurses. The above post is correct in that it will take you a long time at first to get your meds out so don't let the clock make you frazzled - always one thing at a time. I've been doing this almost 20 years and I still take time to try to learn something new everyday. Respect the others that you work with.. From the housekeeping to the dietary to other nurses and CNA's. it's those that give respect that receive it. And always ask questions if you don't understand something. It's a simple thing to ask and it shows you want to do not only a good job but also get the job done the right way.

    Best of luck to you and God Bless!

    P.s. Leave work at the clock. Take time for yourself. Don't boggle your mind with it at home. It will keep you from burn out much easier!

    Perfect! If you heed this advise, you will be a stellar nurse
    sallyrnrrt likes this.
  9. 0
    You might want to work with someone on med pass. That would free up time to get the work that you need to get done done.
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    i have found that thanking the CNAs for their help towards the end of a shift, sure seems to help every one
    RNstrong and NutmeggeRN like this.
  11. 0
    I love the advice to read the charts in down time, but as a relatively new grad myself, I have yet to find any! I haven't had time for dinner yet, I finally managed to pee during my shift the other night for the first time. I'm slow, inefficient and I still get sidetracked often- a hunt for cookies or ice cream mid med-pass, a conversation with a dementia resident that lasts 10 minutes, etc. Not intended to be a whine, it's just how things are for me right now. My 30 resident med pass takes about 2.5- 3 hours (first one usually has 26-27 residents, second one has about 20), then the treatments are about an hour depending on the night. That leaves the last hour for charting, but I'm usually there 30 -90 minutes late.

    My advice would be, do your best and know that's the best you can do. It will be slow, it will feel overwhelming, but if you're providing the care that you would want for your loved ones, you're doing okay.

    Good luck.


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