how PRN schedule works in LTC

  1. 0
    Hi everyone, I was hoping I could get some answers from anyone familiar with PRN shifts in the LTC setting. When I worked as a tech in a hospital, I worked registry where I logged in to the computer and chose whatever shifts I wanted. This was done about a month in advance so they could set the schedule and be covered for all shifts. If on the morning I was scheduled to work they didn't need me, they would call me at least 2 hours in advance of the start of my shift to cancel me.


    My question is, is this the same as PRN? working in a hospital, I had no problems getting the hours I needed. I accepted a PRN position (RN) this Friday in LTC, but before I could ask the ADON questions about how their PRN scheduling works, she was needed elsewhere and was unable to answer my questions. I start orientation Monday and will of course ask her my questions then. In the meantime, I can't stop thinking about if I'm going to get enough hours. I've applied everywhere with no luck. I need about 16-24 hours a week. (More is welcome too) Does this sound possible for LTC? when they do the scheduling, do they ask me to put down my availability, then call and cancel those days they do not need me? Or is PRN simply a constant on call position. Any insight would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for your time.
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 7 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    How each facility handles their PRN is different so only your facility can answer your question.

    I've worked PRN for 3 different SNFs/LTC and one hospice. For all but one SNF they would just call me whenever they needed me, usually the day of because someone called in sick. So they were, as you described, constant on call positions. The only times I knew my schedule ahead of time is if someone asked for vacation or leave and they'd have me fill their days until they came back. The last SNF scheduled me one day a week and I was on call like the others the rest of times.

    At any given time, however, I was always employed at at least 3 places and made full time hours and more most of the time between the 3. This was in my first year of nursing though, so I dealt with it because my options were limited as a new grad.
  5. 0
    Thanks Squishy. I'm taking what I can too being a semi new grad. I'll keep applying for other jobs to work as much as I can.
  6. 0
    Our schedules are made a month in advance. If there are holes in the schedule due to a vacation or vacant position the per diem nurses are called and put on the schedule. If someone calls out for a shift, the per diems are called and asked if they are available. I've been at this facility for close to a year and we haven't cancelled anyone.
  7. 1
    At my facility, it works just as CapeCod described above. My facility also uses per diems quite often. It seems that our full-time staff is basically JUST enough to get through each day. So, when ONE nurse calls out, all hell breaks loose. Yesterday was one of those days...
    sallyrnrrt likes this.
  8. 0
    Thanks for the replies. I feel I have a better grasp of how it works. My orientation starts tomorrow, so I can ask her if they tend to have to cancel people a lot. I really really want on average 2 days a week. I found a lot more SNFs I'm going to apply for too
    .
  9. 0
    Where I work I am PRN and I am used to fill in the gaps where needed and am put on the schedule 1 month at a time. If I wanted to I could work more than the hours I get now. I also try to go in when they have a call out, busy day or just need extra hands.
  10. 0
    I was hired as a pt, 2 days per week and I started a month ago. I have yet to work only 2 days per week...it's been 4-5...more if I wanted.....so I don't think it would be a problem. There always seems to be someone calling in sick, or in my facilities case, nurses resigning since the new company takeover and new computerized system coming in.....I am a new grad, had 6 days orientation and feel totally overwhelmed. I wish there were more PRN people to pick up the slack.


Top