What would you think if...?

  1. Well, first I would like to say hello to you all :spin: I'm new here.
    My question is how would you take it if your instructor described you as "joyful and strong willed"? Will you take it as a compliment or insult? I think I'm a little confused because "strong willed" was one of the words used when she was describing the class trouble maker . Please help. Future LVN in need of a diagnosis.
    •  
  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    Welcome to these forums!

    I wouldn't look too hard into what the instructor personally thought of me, as long as I am passing his/her class. I also would not read too much into the words that this instructor used to describe me. When you receive that LVN license and enter the real world of nursing, there will be far more effectual things for you to worry about. This is not one of them. My advice is to let this issue roll off your back like a duck in water, and to not be so concerned with what the instructor thinks of you.

    After all, the instructor is not going to lose any sleep whatsoever over worrying about what any of the students personally think of him/her. Good luck with school!
  4. by   Tnightingale
    Thanks Commuter! You're right. However, last week one of the students got into a little disgreement with her and she said that she was very shocked that a student would even try to challenge her and that she wasn't able to sleep for a couple of days and that she contacted her "state board" friend and asked for advice. I'll just continue to be a good student, I think and stay away from any drama.
  5. by   mysterious_one
    Hi,
    welcome to allnurses,

    I needed two recommendations from instructors for an extern position. So maybe , that is why you are concerned. So why don't you just adjust your actions a little, so you don't come across to her like that. You could ask her, what she specifically means in being "strong willed". Maybe she doesn't mean it in a negative way.
  6. by   Jilaweez
    I wouldn't take it as an insult. I am joyful...and strong willed, although not so much that I can't admit when I'm wrong or in need of advice. As long as you are open and willing to learn she may have meant it in a good way. Joyful is a good thing, and we should be strong willed...it could come in handy at times when we need to advocate for our patients. At least she didn't say you were crabby and unwilling to learn, then I might be concerned..haha!
  7. by   catzy5
    Quote from Tnightingale
    Well, first I would like to say hello to you all :spin: I'm new here.
    My question is how would you take it if your instructor described you as "joyful and strong willed"? Will you take it as a compliment or insult? I think I'm a little confused because "strong willed" was one of the words used when she was describing the class trouble maker . Please help. Future LVN in need of a diagnosis.

    I think it's one of those words you have to take in its context. I see a person who is strong willed as, someone who is self assertive, isn't a follower has a mind of their own and isn't afraid to use it. On the other hand if you have had run in's with this instructor and refused to yield your mind and seemed stuborn you could take strong willed as a negitive term. In conjunction with joyful I am leaning more toward the positive.
  8. by   Tnightingale
    Thank all of you so much! I really value all of your opinions.

    "Crabby and unwilling to learn" lol.. You're right, then I really should be concerned. Thanks again!
  9. by   smk1
    Quote from Tnightingale
    Thanks Commuter! You're right. However, last week one of the students got into a little disgreement with her and she said that she was very shocked that a student would even try to challenge her and that she wasn't able to sleep for a couple of days and that she contacted her "state board" friend and asked for advice. I'll just continue to be a good student, I think and stay away from any drama.
    That right there is the key. Cooperate and graduate.
  10. by   Daytonite
    hi, tnightingale and welcome to allnurses!

    i just looked up the definition of "strong-willed" in my webster's dictionary (college edition). it says it means strong-minded. the definition for strong-minded which is a few lines above it says, "determined". seems to me that this is a pretty positive characteristic for a nurse to have. i would have taken it as a compliment and thanked the old biddy. ha! ha!
  11. by   beth66335
    Quote from catzy5
    I think it's one of those words you have to take in its context. I see a person who is strong willed as, someone who is self assertive, isn't a follower has a mind of their own and isn't afraid to use it.
    :yeahthat:
  12. by   Mesomorph
    I have royally ticked off one instructor for not doing one absurd 12-hour-long assignment that she wanted me to do, but that wasn't for a grade and wasn't in the syllabus haha. It became this huge ordeal. The professor scared everyone else, but I was sick of her overbearing tomfoolery. The lady was obese, ignorant, and rude. lol.

    Yay for strong-willed.
  13. by   RN BSN 2009
    Having a mind of your own is a good thing!
  14. by   RunsWscissors
    Well, strong-willed for me has negative connotations. However, that being said, my grandmother finds it to be a compliment. That your instructor chose to pair it with joyful is positive I think. She could have said strong willed and confrontational, etc, etc...

    At any rate, I would NOT let it get to you. Just continue to be joyful and keep paddling along.

    Wendi

close