what degree path to take: Associates or Bachelors

  1. hi, just a question to all you who may be in a nursing program or are already nurses. im having a hard time determining whether i want to get my associates in nursing first or go straight for my bachelors in nursing.any guidance would greatly be appreciated. thanks
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   maire
    This is a topic that has been heavily debated on this BB, so you will get most of the answers to your questions if you do a search of the site. "BSN Debate" or something similar should get you a ton of threads to read over!

    Here are a few to get you started:
    http://allnurses.com/forums/showthre...ght=bsn+debate
    http://allnurses.com/forums/showthre...ght=bsn+debate
    http://allnurses.com/forums/showthre...ght=bsn+debate

    HTH.
    Welcome to allnurses.
  4. by   janetrette
    i just graduate from an ASN program. i am speaking on my view of my program and i feel that i am being "cheated" on the educational level. meaning, it's a fast pace program.

    i regret not going for my BSN thinking ASN would be easier to achieve but that's not how it work. im planning in getting BSN. but it all varies, some of my classmate don't want to spend 4yrs and rather just have an ASN. it was based on their age and family situation.
  5. by   Tweety
    Getting your ADN first is usually cheaper and quicker and gets you working as an RN faster. Then you can go to work and get tuition reimbursement for your BSN. You will be an RN and make good money are an associates degreed person.

    I would go for the BSN if you have the resouces and the time. The more education, the better long-term job opportunities you will have.

    I'm finally going for mine after procrastinating for 15 years.
  6. by   mom2michael
    It really depends on what you need your education to be. It also depends on the time you have to complete the degree, the financial resources, etc..

    For me, the ADN is the only route I could take right now. Money, distance to get to school, etc...all factored in to my decision. I am also a non traditional student who already has 1 BS degree. I have a job, husband and a child...oh and also a business to run. I had to factor my WHOLE life into my decision. The ADN was the best possible thing for ME.

    I had to take what I needed out of my degree and figure out the best possible way to get there. For me, it was the ADN degree. For others it will be the BSN degree and even for others, it will be going on for even further advanced degrees.

    The best advice I can give you is to research all the possible ideas, schools, etc...and find which one fits you and your needs.

    Good luck!!
  7. by   Jen2
    I will graduate in May with my ADN. After this the hospital that I am working at will pay for my BSN. That's why I chose the ADN route. I also feel cheated with the ADN route because it is so fast paced that I don't have time to enjoy my education. Yes I am in an ADN program but we still have Peds, OB, OR, community health, psych, management, med surg 1 and 11, and pharm all in two years. It's just so fast paced that I am stressed all the time. I just figured hey why pay for four years of school when I can pay for two and have the hospital pay for two. This was the only reason why I chose the ADN. You will need to find what works best for you in your situation. I plan on starting on my BSN the same year I graduate with my ADN, becasue if I take time off, I know that I'll never finish. Even though I am young and have no desire to do anything other than bedside nursing, my feelings may change when I hit my 40's or 50's so having the BSN when I hit that age will give me more options to do other things. Best of luck to you.
  8. by   GPatty
    I am doing my BSn because I am already 42 years old, and do not want to be in school for the rest of my life!
    I figure once I do graduate, I will be at a PERSONAL satisfation level in my education and will have ample opportunities to go in almost any direction I may choose.
    Choosing ADN or BSN is a personal choice, a personal matter...one or another does not make a better nurse.
    Good Luck to you!
  9. by   caligirl
    I chose the BSN route simply because i never even considered getting an associates in anything. I started school with social work in mind (which requires a masters to counsel) and migrated to nursing.

    I know I eventually want to get my masters and going for my BSN right off the bat is the path of least resistance. I will say that I do have a supportive husband (who has his masters and DONE with school) and the GI bill so I am not "struggling." I also may go back in the military and you need a bachelors for that.

    I have had people ask me why I chose this route and the only answer I can think of is "why not? Why stop at an associates if not necessary?" It was just never an option for me.
  10. by   Gompers
    If you have the time and money, just go for the BSN. It's a lot easier to get it done with before you start working than to try and balance school and work later on. Plus, you get to enjoy your education more, and you'll be taking classes in all kinds of other subjects that you might enjoy as well. I don't know your age, but if you're just out of high school, going to a four-year college is probably something you'd never regret. I wouldn't trade my college experience for anything!!! It's a great time in your life.

    If you have any kind of time or money constraints, then it's probably better to get the ADN so you can start working in two years instead of four.
  11. by   acgemt
    I think it is just an ego issue for me. I graduated high school in 99 and went to a 4 year college for a major I switched out of 2 1/2 years into it (switched to nursing). Well I had all my pre-reqs done and because of money, I had to settle for an associates degree at a community college that had a nursing program (the 4 year school didn't). Anyway...I will be graduating this may 2005 with only an associates degree.

    If you go to a community college, after you do your pre-reqs, then it is an additional 2 years for the actual program. Why waste your time going 4 years for an associates when you can go the same amount of time for your bachelors!!?? Good luck to you...hope this opinion helps!!
  12. by   CarlJ
    One thing a professor mentioned in class last week was that some certifications (I don't know what ones) require prior education levels. So a BSN may be required before you can be certified in some areas. Since I haven't joined the nursing workforce yet, I don't know how important those certifications are.

    Carl
  13. by   SoulShine75
    Quote from acgemt
    I think it is just an ego issue for me. I graduated high school in 99 and went to a 4 year college for a major I switched out of 2 1/2 years into it (switched to nursing). Well I had all my pre-reqs done and because of money, I had to settle for an associates degree at a community college that had a nursing program (the 4 year school didn't). Anyway...I will be graduating this may 2005 with only an associates degree.

    If you go to a community college, after you do your pre-reqs, then it is an additional 2 years for the actual program. Why waste your time going 4 years for an associates when you can go the same amount of time for your bachelors!!?? Good luck to you...hope this opinion helps!!
    I agree with you totally and I'm in the same boat. It will take me 4 years to get my ADN whereas I could get a BSN in 4 years...BUT there aren't any 4 year colleges near me where they offer the straight to BSN program!! :angryfire There is one but you have to have your ADN already...does that make sense?? Doesn't to me....oh well. Gotta play the hand you're dealt I guess. :uhoh21:

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