Warning to Students! - page 2

Hello, this post is really for future nursing students. I currently work in a Student Health Center of a University. We have had dozens of nursing students who are supposed to start their first... Read More

  1. by   JBudd
    I knew I'd had a measles shot as a teen, as well as a booster as an adult, but couldn't prove it. My titer came back negative, so they either hadn't taken or were no longer active. Sometimes the titer is to show whether or not you need another one. Since I work in an ER, I get exposed a lot; it was nice to know I needed a booster.
  2. by   Altra
    Quote from NickiLaughs
    I agree that it's totally not fair, but it doesn't change their status.
    Can you elaborate on why it is unfair to require students wishing to be admitted to a program in which they will have close contact with already ill and immuno-compromised patients to demonstrate sufficient immunity to some infectious diseases?
  3. by   Altra
    Quote from carolinapooh
    And isn't the point of a titer to PROVE you have the immunizations?
    No, the point of having titers drawn is to demonstrate sufficient immunity ... not simply that you've received the vaccine.

    Some people receive vaccines but do not "seroconvert" meaning they do not develop sufficient antibodies for immunity.
  4. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from Bonny619
    I guess I just don't get why you would need a titer if you had proof of the immunization?
    LOL, that's what I was wondering! What's the point? I didn't have a single proof of my vaccines from when I was a child. Took a minute to go to employee health at my work and get them all drawn (for free).

    If I went to a place, and they told me that I needed to have proof prior to getting the titer, then I would just leave and find someplace else-like the county health department.
  5. by   Megsd
    The only titer AND proof of immunization I needed was for Hep B. I think that's because currently the vaccine is being touted as being good "for life", but I have heard they are considering implementing a policy for boosters, so apparently there is some doubt about the longevity of the vaccine.

    Every other requirement was either/or.
  6. by   smk1
    Quote from NickiLaughs
    Hello, this post is really for future nursing students.

    I currently work in a Student Health Center of a University. We have had dozens of nursing students who are supposed to start their first quarter of classes in 3 weeks. They are all in major panic mode because they just found out they have to have 5 titers including hep B, varicella, measles, mumps and rubella. You cannot get these titers if you are not up to date on your immunizations. Some of them are way behind on immunizations, and will not get to start this quarter.

    I agree that it's totally not fair, but it doesn't change their status.

    Soooo...for all of you planning to start a program in the near or distant future!
    Please, start bugging the nursing department of the requirements for clinicals.You will not regret being prepared.

    Good luck all!
    Why can't you get the titers? many people get titers because they don't have their immunization records and are unsure of their immunization status. I got a titer for Hep B because I did't have documentation for it. I would encourge all students to check with their school to see what is acceptable immunization clearance for the nursing programs and go from there.
  7. by   smattles1of2
    I had to pay for my titers too. My dr couldn't get me in in time to get my packet turned in. $250 later...blah.
  8. by   marilynmom
    Quote from Megsd
    The only titer AND proof of immunization I needed was for Hep B. I think that's because currently the vaccine is being touted as being good "for life", but I have heard they are considering implementing a policy for boosters, so apparently there is some doubt about the longevity of the vaccine.

    Every other requirement was either/or.
    Your correct. Most of the studied I have seen on the longevity of the HepB vaccine was about 8-15 years on average, and of course there are a lot out there who never seroconvert to begin with. I don't think there are any vaccines that are life long.
  9. by   ladyinred667
    Quote from JBudd
    I knew I'd had a measles shot as a teen, as well as a booster as an adult, but couldn't prove it. My titer came back negative, so they either hadn't taken or were no longer active. Sometimes the titer is to show whether or not you need another one. Since I work in an ER, I get exposed a lot; it was nice to know I needed a booster.
    Same thing happened to me! I had my titers drawn and it turned out I wasn't immune to measles. I had to have the MMR again since apparently it's hard to just find a measles vax. I showed immunity to chicken pox and everything else I needed to.

    I had to have a TB test and the Hep B series. Tetanus was suggested but not required so I opted not to since I had it 3 years prior.

    It makes absolutely NO sense to require proof of immunizations if you are getting titers done anyway.
  10. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from marilynmom
    I don't think there are any vaccines that are life long.
    I don't know, I've had the Hep B vax for 13 years now, and my titers are 3x the normal range, as are all my titers, including MMR (which is way older than that!).
  11. by   luvmy3kids
    I needed proof of my immunizations for my volunteer work at the hospital.... after moving (I don't know... like 400 times) and my parents divorce... my mom had no idea where to find them...

    I contacted my previous college, I contacted my old clinics I went to....but they didn't have all of my records, or they couldn't find them at all....

    Anyway... a good resource is the high school you attended.... I graduated from HS in 1992 and they still had my records on file... I just had to have them archived and they printed me up a copy to keep and one for my employer...

    HTH's for anyone who needs to locate them!
  12. by   noBS N
    Why dont they just mix all the vaccines together in one big needle as if spiking punch with more than 1 type of vodka and just give you a shot that leaves the imprint of a Gun Shot wound. Get it all out the way.
  13. by   Plagueis
    I know I'm reviving this thread, but I only just realized that I have to worry about immunization requirements for LPN school, which starts this July. (If I get in.) Forgive me if I seem confused about everything, but I have no idea exactly what immunizations I have had. I know that I got a hepatitus B vaccine and a TB test for work, but I have no clue about whether I have protection against MMR, or have had a tetanus shot. I did have the chicken pox, but I have no proof of that since I didn't go to a doctor. I have no idea who my pediatrician was, and my parents and grandparents have passed away, and they were the only ones who would know who she or he was. I called the LPN school about immunization requirements, but all they told me was not to worry about it until after the entrance exam, which is the one thing that determines who gets into the LPN class. However, I don't want to not get in because I didn't have the required immunizations. I hear about these titers, and I'm wondering if they would be "enough" to show that I have immunity, even though I have no immunization records. If I'm not immune, will I have enough time between now and the start of school to catch up with certain vaccinations? I'm just worried that not having a record, so to speak, will keep me from nursing school.

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