Repeating Science Courses??!!!

  1. Hi all...Just looking for some friendly feedback. I had to repeat two of my pre-req science courses in college and am now applying to accelerated nursing programs. Does anyone know if schools would look at this as a positive thing or a negative? I just feel like I am outlawed from becoming a nurse because I got C's and now I am paying for it....Does anyone have any input or success stories about getting into nursing school with repeated science classes???
    •  
  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    Quote from DEVON3
    Hi all...Just looking for some friendly feedback. I had to repeat two of my pre-req science courses in college and am now applying to accelerated nursing programs. Does anyone know if schools would look at this as a positive thing or a negative? I just feel like I am outlawed from becoming a nurse because I got C's and now I am paying for it....Does anyone have any input or success stories about getting into nursing school with repeated science classes???
    Unfortunately, they are going to review all of your grades/classes, etc. in the past....especially the sciences. Your issue is going to more prevalent in the accelerated programs, because they are just that. They move along quite quickly. You may wish to look at more traditional programs as a backup.
  4. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from DEVON3
    Hi all...Just looking for some friendly feedback. I had to repeat two of my pre-req science courses in college and am now applying to accelerated nursing programs. Does anyone know if schools would look at this as a positive thing or a negative? I just feel like I am outlawed from becoming a nurse because I got C's and now I am paying for it....Does anyone have any input or success stories about getting into nursing school with repeated science classes???

    Can you maybe take some courses over (if at all possible) to improve your grade?

    Good luck
  5. by   TraumaRN1983
    The way my nursing program worked was that you could retake any pre-reqs you weren't satisfied with and the grade you got the second time was the one that counted (unless of course, it ended up being lower than the first time). So if you got a C in Chemistry the first time, but then retook it and got an A, they counted the A and didn't factor in the C grade at all. I don't know if that's the way your nursing program works. Another possibility is that they will look at both grades, and if you improved any of your grades that should make you a better candidate. Hope this helps!
  6. by   Daytonite
    I had to repeat Anatomy and Physiology. The grade I got the second time around was the one that was included in the calculation of my GPA. When I transferred in to the university, they calculated by GPA based on the grades I had gotten only in the classes that they gave me transfer credit for.
  7. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    I had to repeat A&P. I didn't do well at all when I took it 13 years ago! This time, I made an A.

    My school actually says to repeat classes to get your grade higher, at your own risk of course.

    I don't think it should matter, you may have not learned it all the first time, but eventually it will sink in.

    Good luck!
  8. by   AuntieRN
    I had to repeat the first half of A&P 3 times. When I first started we needed to get a C+ to get into the program and I kept getting a C. I moved to a different state and a different school and all I needed was a C. I am in my third semester of a 5 semester ADN program. It can be done probably just depends on the school and their program standards. Good luck to ya!
  9. by   Daytonite
    Quote from fun2care
    i had to repeat a&p. i didn't do well at all when i took it 13 years ago! this time, i made an a. my school actually says to repeat classes to get your grade higher, at your own risk of course. i don't think it should matter, you may have not learned it all the first time, but eventually it will sink in. good luck!
    after 30 years as a nurse let me assure you that if there is something you didn't learn from your a&p class it is going to come up again in your nursing classes as you study the various disease conditions (again). if you still don't get it there, you will learn it on the job. if you end up working on a cardiac unit, you will learn the circulation of the heart ad nauseum. if you work neuro you will learn about the function of the various cranial nerves and spinal nerves. if you work with patients with liver or kidney diseases you will crack open your a&p textbook again. the reason is that you have a better understanding of how a disease's progress affects the various organ systems and why certain medications, treatments and basic nursing actions are helping. just about everything that is done for a patient can somehow be traced back to some feature of anatomy or physiology and your nursing instructors are going to want you to learn these things. this is one reason why nurses and doctors do clinicals. nursing instructors try to assure that each student has an opportunity to care for patients with certain types of diseases so the student can see first hand how they have affected the human body.

close