Professional in scrubs? - page 9

Hello, I just flipped through the April AJN and came across an interesting article r/t history of RN uniforms. An interesting point was made, that although new scrubs are cheaper, easier to take... Read More

  1. by   greeneggsnham
    A few days ago, we had a motivational speaker come in to speak to us. Before his presentation and as I was sitting down, he made a comment about my SpongeBob scrubs (spongebob top and khaki pants) and how the outfit looked like pajamas. This was coming from a man who travels around and gives presentations, and does not work the daily mess and grime of nursing. I told him that my patients seemed to really like it, even the adults. I am in and out of my car all day long doing home care, in some of the diritest places, some without air conditioning, pets that climb all over you, insects etc. I was offended by his comments, but said nothing. I figured he was just another member of the sometimes ignorant public who has no idea what a nurse really does.
    Frankly, the issue of the white uniform should be a non-issue. I can't count the number of times where I was in my white uniform with my name tag that says RN in bold letters and sometimes with a white cap on my head and someone asks me "where is the nurse?"
    To me the old style nursing uniform conjures up subservience. It is simply a way of making others conform. I see the Nightingale look a part of history. I appreciate the uniform as that. I never wanted to wear the white cap and white uniform, I simply wanted to be a nurse. Maybe my opinions differ from some of you and I don't mean to offend. I don't see how there could be a universal uniform that all nurses could wear, our roles and tasks are too varied. At least in the military, there is a uniform for every role!
  2. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    I cannot recall the last time i saw an MD in their white coat. It was either the blue OR scrubs or street clothes.
    Exactly! When I see physicians in the hospital, they're doing rounds, so they don't have to worry about getting crap on them so of course they're wearing a nice shirt and a tie... if they were getting puked on etc. they'd wear scrubs too. I like scrubs...I'll keep them.
  3. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from Fancywhitecat
    <Why should nurses change? Let housekeeping change, let lab and xray change etc. Just a thought.
    Yeah, I think the same way. Why does houskeeping need to wear scrubs??? Why does xray need to wear scrubs??? Dietary??? I don't get it.
  4. by   cherokeesummer
    stick me in some cute scrubs and I'm happy. I do see what you are saying though because it is true, in some offices everyone can wear scrubs from the front desk to the examination table. So yes, it could probably be confusing for the patients.

    But, I'm with the scrubs, in fact I dream of wearing them LOL!

    Our school finally this year did away with the old flying nun look uniforms. The classes before us worked hard and got the uniforms changed to those from Dove. They are comfier! And it is white pants, navy blue polo shirt and white vest. That sure is comfy!
  5. by   Altra
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    I cannot recall the last time i saw an MD in their white coat. It was either the blue OR scrubs or street clothes.
    This surprised me, because I can't recall the last time I saw an MD who was NOT in the white coat, except psychiatrists or those in OR scrubs. This probably varies from facility to facility and region to region.
  6. by   cns48
    I think scrubs are comfortable for nurses. I also believe that agencies are suppose to require people to be identifiable. According to law, no one can use the title of nurse except a nurse.

    I also think it is up to the nurse to introduce her and himself to the patient so the patient is not confused. I also think it is the way the nurse carries her himself that should stand out.

    I do not think that it is necessary to go back to traditional uniforms. This change, so does attire. It doesn't change who the nurse is or what he or she does.
  7. by   wonderbee
    "THE NURSE"
    May be a little off topic but now working as tech while attending RN school, I have come to realize that most of the direct, hands-on nursing care a patient receives is from the tech/CNA. Although I'm clear to distinguish the difference between THE NURSE and the PCT to the patient and how our roles will differ in their care, if someone on the street asked me what I do for a living, I would tell them without reservation that I'm a nurse. I have a developed a great appreciation for what good nursing care from the hands of a caring skilled tech can make in patient's health care. Just my .02 cents.

    We have a board in the patients rooms with the names, titles and phone extensions of each caregiver assigned to them for any given shift. This alleviates a lot of the confusion. For those who cannot read due to disorientation, it isn't going to matter anyway who wears what IMHO.
  8. by   jaimealmostRN
    Quote from RNKittyKat
    "THE NURSE"
    May be a little off topic but now working as tech while attending RN school, I have come to realize that most of the direct, hands-on nursing care a patient receives is from the tech/CNA. Although I'm clear to distinguish the difference between THE NURSE and the PCT to the patient and how our roles will differ in their care, if someone on the street asked me what I do for a living, I would tell them without reservation that I'm a nurse.
    I truly feel that one must EARN the title of "Nurse." For me, it will be all the more sweeter to wait until I have that diploma and lisense in my hand before I call myself that.
  9. by   MrsCannibal
    I remember watching my mom graduate from nursing school when I was about 10 yrs old, and I thought she looked so beautiful in her dress, pinafore, and starched white cap. She would grumble and cuss, usually about putting women in dresses to take care of patients, especially white dresses! At the beginning of this thread, the discussion touched on the military. I don't know about the Navy (I think that is the branch mentioned, I'm sorry if I am wrong), but I was a combat medic in the Army, and as far as the nurses and doctors, and everyone else went, we all pretty much wore BDU's, just another uniform like scrubs. I could tell who was who, but a civilian, much like a patient in the hospital, would probably have a hard time differentiating between a private working the front desk, and a captain who was also a Doctor.
  10. by   jaenshaesmom
    I am currently a nursing student and a PCA at a local hospital. Our hospital just passed a new rule that all PCA's will wear evergreen scrubs that have "St. John's Mercy PCA" stitched on them and nurses will wear navy pants and white tops.
  11. by   StrbryJelo
    I've been a nurse for 27 years and had to wear white-with & w/out a cap-for around 17 of those years. The thought of having to wear a "uniform" again makes me sick to my stomach. I hate to even buy white underwear. In the ICU I work in we can wear any colors we like and it's wonderful. The floors are allowed the same freedom. I agree with those before me that badges, introductions and info boards in patient rooms are sufficient. Freedom to choose the colors & prints of scrubs that suite me allow me to make a statement about myself just as it does doctors and "civilliians". And I can choose what colors are most flattering to me personally. I think hospitals, MD/dentist offices, etc. shouldn't have the right to tell us what to wear as long as it's appropriate for our work type/location. What tells patients/visitors that you're a professional is the way you present yourself, not the uniform. How many times have you been in a bank, store or other business and had to conduct business with someone who looked very professional, but was far from it? Think again about this folks. Hospitals continue to keep us down and inviting them back into this aspect of our lives is taking us back a step. We need to empower nurses, not regress.
    Mick
  12. by   PACU R/N
    I agree with you. There should be a requirement to look neat and tidy. In my early nursing days, we had to use title and surname when speaking to Doctors and senior nursing staff. I don't address my self to patients using my first name. Always state - Sister Tozer. You can tell I'm of the old school.
  13. by   RNNoMore
    In England, dress uniforms are still worn for female nurses - the colours are standard for whatever type of carer you are - a different colour uniform for ward sisters, nurses, assistants etc. Male nurses wear tunic tops and pants, Doctors wear white labcoats. It certainly does make it more easier to instantly distinguish between staff, and it looks very smart, although I wouldn't want to wear it (pantyhose is way too expensive and I can never wear them more than once without getting a run - I would be bankrupt within weeks LOL!).

    As a student-to-be, we have been told that we cannot wear scrubs, but we have to wear a white tunic top and pants (whatever style we like, as long as it's not scrubs). I'm not too keen on the colour because of practical reasons, but I do LOVE the tunic & pant style I've chosen. It looks very smart and professional and is comfy too. I like the idea of patterned scrubs for pediatric nurses, but not really for adult wards. I think, if allowed, I will carry on with the tunic & pant uniform when I graduate - but in a more practical colour

    P.S. Hubby is VERY disappointed that I won't be wearing the traditional dress (complete with stockings & garter.....) he was looking forward to that SO much LOL!

    Paint.
    Last edit by RNNoMore on Jun 19, '04

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