Preparing Emotionally for NS..... - page 2

The threads detailing what everyone is purchasing for NS is very helpful...I've certainly added a few more things to my list. But I'm wondering - what are you doing to prepare your head, your... Read More

  1. by   Dratz
    Quote from moongirl
    yep yep yep. Also throw in the 6:30 am clinical on about 3 hours of sleep after staying up all night with your puking 4 year old. Don't call in sick unless you are dead or an immediate family member died. That's the way it is, and yes, get used to it.
    Ha ha ha or get this, you are on your way to clinical, with the flu and you have no idea where your teenager spent the night...LOL...yep get used to it, School comes first regardless of LIFE.
  2. by   smurfy
    Quote from moongirl
    yep yep yep. Also throw in the 6:30 am clinical on about 3 hours of sleep after staying up all night with your puking 4 year old. Don't call in sick unless you are dead or an immediate family member died. That's the way it is, and yes, get used to it.


    Be prepared to bring proof that your family member is dead!!
  3. by   Imafloat
    Every program is different and I don't think we are helping someone feel better about the emotional aspect of nursing school if we are telling them worse case scenarios about our programs.

    I will say that my program is exceptional about being flexible. If you are sick with a temp over 100.4 then you need to stay home. It is not good for the patients and when you are sick like that you don't think as well and that is when mistakes get made. If you have a family crisis then you can make clinical up. The only time I missed clincial was when my son was up all night sick and I had 2 hours of sleep. My CI thought that I wouldn't be safe under those conditions so I made that day up. It seems like people would abuse the flexibility, but it rarely happened.
  4. by   moongirl
    flexibility would be nice, but I dont think it is the norm. There is another thread going right now with a student who can't get out of clinicals and she has been subpeoned (sp?) to go to court. You are lucky you are going to school where you are!
  5. by   abbythetabby
    We're allowed to miss one day of class and one day of clinical per semster. Any more and we have to start the semester over the following year. I think that's pretty typical of most programs.


    Quote from Dratz
    5. Be prepared mentally for lowering your standards when it comes to getting all A's. Nursing school has a way of lowering your GPA in such a way that you are happy with just a C.
    While few people in my class get straight A's, it can be done. I refuse to lower my standards just because something is difficult. However, getting all A's is no guarantee that you'll pass the NCLEX, just as getting straight C's doesn't mean you won't. And that's what is really important.
  6. by   ak127
    I went out and bought my study foods. Got chicken soup books at a used store. Reading a couple of novels in the next few weeks to read something fun while I still can, and keep my mind off things to come. Washed and readied all my uniforms. Gave my notice at my job. Giving my boyfriend lots of extra attention between now and then.
  7. by   jov
    I guess it depends on your school. My syllabus for fall specifically states: 1. In order to help safeguard both students and clients in the clinical practice settings, it is imperative that students notify faculty and consult with them about the following:

    a) Any recent exposure to a communicable disease: i.e. Chicken Pox;
    b) Any elevated temperature in the 24 hours prior to going into the clinical practice setting;
    c) Pregnancy or any physical condition that might put themselves or others at risk.

    The clinical instructor will then determine whether the students or client would be at risk if the student participates in clinical experiences.

    I've seen our clinical instructor send people home with a bad cough and I certainly am confident I would not be asked to come to clinical with THE FLU, for crying out loud. I can't imagine any of my instructors demanding I come in while truly sick but then again, I come to clinical prepared, ask pertinent questions, demonstrate self-directed learning, etc. Perhaps that's the difference?
  8. by   firstyearstudent
    At my school they're relatively easy on us, attendance wise, but our program might be unique in padding enough clinical hours into the schedule to allow two missed days.

    Also, despite all the tough talk, I have found that the faculty and administration will bend over backwards to help students make up hours if they've proved that they're dedicated students and have a good excuse. Officially, of course, you're out on your a**. So it makes sense to not necessarily brown nose, but to at least keep it clean.
  9. by   fleur-de-lis
    Wow! I am grateful my school is not so strict. I was in the ER with severe abdominal pain on a Sun morning, thought to be gallbladder problem (was not thank goodness), but could not make clinicals Mon. Instructor said no prob. On Tues I showed up with severe nausea, and instructor let me get away with just writing up a hypothetical care plan then going home. No one wanted me to throw up on a patient!!!! Good luck everyone!
  10. by   moongirl
    Quote from jov
    I guess it depends on your school. My syllabus for fall specifically states: 1. In order to help safeguard both students and clients in the clinical practice settings, it is imperative that students notify faculty and consult with them about the following:

    a) Any recent exposure to a communicable disease: i.e. Chicken Pox;
    b) Any elevated temperature in the 24 hours prior to going into the clinical practice setting;
    c) Pregnancy or any physical condition that might put themselves or others at risk.

    The clinical instructor will then determine whether the students or client would be at risk if the student participates in clinical experiences.

    I've seen our clinical instructor send people home with a bad cough and I certainly am confident I would not be asked to come to clinical with THE FLU, for crying out loud. I can't imagine any of my instructors demanding I come in while truly sick but then again, I come to clinical prepared, ask pertinent questions, demonstrate self-directed learning, etc. Perhaps that's the difference?
    implying that I would NOT get kicked from the program with 2 misses if I was a perfect student- always prepared- A's on my tests- rave reviews from my pts, and my CI, is complete nonsense. Policy is policy. 2 misses and I am outta there, even if my name was Mother Theresa and my GPA was 4.0. Your policy says " consult them about the following" it does not say that you will def be excused, maybe you will, yay for you. My school doesn't work that way
  11. by   GratefulHeart
    Preparing emotionally, let's see -

    1) Practice an attitude of gratitude in the face of stress. Life could always be worse, right?
    2) When blindsided by disappointment and/or failure, repeat to myself "This too shall pass..."
    3) Look around for someone else to encourage each day; don't forget that others are struggling too.
    4) Follow the advice of my nurse mentor/friend: Just fake it til you make it (that is expect MANY moments of feeling clumsy and incompetent until nursing skills become second nature.).
    5) Last on the list but first in priority: Read the Bible daily, pray, and listen.
  12. by   GratefulHeart
    O and one last thing - aim for competency versus perfect grades. I'm not shooting for straight As this time 'round; I'm shooting for a more balanced life along the strenuous journey. Success for me means nurturing relationships with my husband and kids while doing the best that I can with nursing school - not expecting nor striving for perfection.

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