Not as hard as I anticipated.... - page 3

O.k. I am only a first semester student, but I was under the impression from other students that nursing school was going to be insanely difficult. (I am in an accelerated BSN program by the way) ... Read More

  1. by   KEL2BanRN
    MMW, you study 8-10 hrs in ONE day? I think after several hours, the info would go right out of my brain and I wouldn't be retaining any of it.
  2. by   MikeyJ
    Quote from FNPhopeful
    Its not just about memorizing facts or being able to pass hand washing-
    which yes may be easy....
    Whoa... I am sure you didn't direct this at me, but rather were probably speaking in general. However, I do not do well in school by memorzing facts. In an earlier post I had stated that I flat out stink at rote memorization. I have a horrible time just memorizing information -- I need to learn it. Thus, when I study (whatever subject, nursing or non-nursing), I focus on learning the material, and not memorizing. So I am not doing well in school because I have a good memory. I do well because I try extremely hard and try to learn it.

    And as I stated before, I understand that there will be plenty of challenges in nursing school -- especially in the latter semesters. I am not trying to imply that nursing school is easy for me. I am just saying that it definitely isn't as hard as I thought it was going to be.

    Like CRNAHopeful, I think a lot of it comes down to attitude. I am probably the most cheerful and optimistic person you will meet. I rarely have bad days, and when I wake up in the morning, I tell myself "today is going to be a good day!" I am also big into running (training for my 1st marathon actually) and that helps me focus on school as well. I think my attitude helps me out a ton in school -- because a lot of people around me are "freaking" out and getting stressed out because we are in nursing school. I, on the other hand, am excited to be where I am, excited to learn, excited about my professors and classmates, and as a direct result I am doing awesome and not having much difficultly.
  3. by   Cherish
    Some people find things easier than others. Just like in reg. classes, English can be easier on one person than the other or math. I am not in nursing school but I don't doubt that there are students who will find school easier compared to others.

    I think some people are getting a little defensive because your intentions might be to say it's easy but their reading it as I must not be that intellectual compared to this person because it's not easy for me. Not saying you said this but you can probably relate. When one finds something easy and the other is having difficulty and doing everything in their power to comprehend the other person feels not as smart and is wondering how that individual finds something so easy.

    I myself can't judge how well I will do in NS until I start but I know it is an extremely hard program (diploma school sort of militaryesque). But I might strive in a program like that since I have served in the Army for 6 yrs and love that sort of hardwork. We will see. But I am glad you are finding the program not as stressful or hard as others perceive it and hope you become a great nurse.
  4. by   LadyEJ BSN, RN
    Quote from FNPhopeful
    In maternity the instructors gonna tell you,- ok 30 year old patient who is a gravida 1 para 3 has vitals that read BP 165/110 Temp 101.2 Resp are 28 and HR is 99. She is complaining of headaches and appears to be hyperventilating.
    I was just wondering gravida 1 para 3...isn't this impossible? (Confused, I'm not in nursing school yet)
  5. by   TazziRN
    Nope......gravida 1 = first pregnancy. Para 3 = triplets.
  6. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from FNPhopeful
    Just wait until 2nd semester and 3rd and so on.
    Its hard because you have to apply your knowledge, and figure out what is going on with your patients with what available data you have on them. There is also alot of ethical dilemmas you have to think through, how would you handle this crisis?
    Its not just about memorizing facts or being able to pass hand washing-
    which yes may be easy....

    In maternity the instructors gonna tell you,- ok 30 year old patient who is a gravida 1 para 3 has vitals that read BP 165/110 Temp 101.2 Resp are 28 and HR is 99. She is complaining of headaches and appears to be hyperventilating. Her platelet count is such and such and her WBC count is this. What do her vitals indicate and what meds should you administer? What is the number one priority? When do you call the physician? What is the baby's condition? and so on.
    Now we all might find the answer to these situations easy as we progress, but initially its kinda like woah!
    How is it possible for her to be gravida 1 para 3? Isn't she pregnant now? I assume so since you ask about the baby's condition. She would at least have to be gravida 2.
  7. by   Lisa CCU RN
    .....
    Last edit by Lisa CCU RN on May 27, '07
  8. by   MB37
    When I said I study 8-10 hours some days, it's not exactly intensive sitting in the library studying. I might play back my lecture from the day before while typing up my notes, which takes a few hours (we have 3-4 hour classes), then make lunch and fool around on this site, then read my chapter for my online class and do the module, then move to the couch and start reading patho. I can't focus on anything for that long either. I mostly just have a book in front of me most of the time, and that keeps me from having to pull all nighters or move into the library before an exam. So far I'm ahead, so it seems to be working.
  9. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from CRNASOMEDAY25
    I don't know about that. I know LPN's who failed out of the program, single people with no children who failed too. The only thing I don't do is work full time. I have an extern position, but I go pretty part-time. I have two children age 7 and 5 who demand a lot of attention, so I use them to study and they learn something in the process too. Now my daughter asks her teacher for workbooks to complete and does them with no prompting form me and is always tellin me how she is trying to learn and be smart like her mommy.

    Our skills tests are very fair. There are EXACT steps we have to pass that are spelled out. All you have to do is complete all the steps and you pass. There is no subjectivity.
    Our pass rate is 100%.
    Well.....all I can tell you is I DO know of what I speak. I saw LPNs fail out, and single people who failed out as well....that wasn't my point. My point was that extraneous activities CAN impact negatively. And the educational background I mentioned impacts how you study: are you already a college grad, used to studying at that level, or did you complete high school 20 years previously and haven't studied since? Issues like that. Actually, our best students DID tend to be those with alot going on, jobs and children included, but it does depend on what kind of support system you have and how you, personally, handle scholastics.

    I found "working" on my kids to be useful, too

    As for no subjectivity, all I can say is how very rare that must be! I never heard of a nursing school that didn't have subjectivity as part and parcel of the process, but then again, none of us knows all that's out there, do we? Hard for me to imagine NOT having subjectivity come into play when it comes to clinicals and skill evaluations, but obviously different schools will do things differently. Probably one of the biggest complaints students have is how very subjective so much of the clinical work is.

    For what it's worth, I also can't imagine any school TELLING you that there IS subjectivity in their clinical grading. It'd be akin to saying "we decide if you should be a nurse or not", and you'll never hear that. I'm pretty sure if I looked through my school stuff I'd see something about how all the grades=pass or fail. But I can absolutely, without question tell you that there were those students with passing grades who did NOT pass clinicals, or skill evals, because of that unwritten subjectivity worked in there.

    Regardless, I wish you the best and hope you continue to have a great experience in school.
    Last edit by RNsRWe on May 27, '07 : Reason: afterthought
  10. by   decartes
    I share your sentiments about nursing school. I have just graduated with high honors from an accelerated BSN program and I agree that absorbing and processing the AMOUNT of information was the challenge. I personally wouldn't call nursing school easy out of respect and the fact that it's not easy. However, I enjoyed the knowledge and the challenge of its application. Maybe you find it "easy" because you are enjoying what you are doing. I sure did.
  11. by   smk1
    Quote from CRNASOMEDAY25
    I'm about to enter the 4th semester out of five. The second semester was endocrine and cardio in adult health, so I've already done that. What do others find so hard about those two systems? I have yet to figure that out. They are what they are, nothing tricky. My advise is to not memorize, but learn how things work. My pet peeve is people who won't go back to the A&P book to learn the pathway of blood through the heart or the chambers. I suggested this to a few students that kept asking me how I was passing the tests and not freaking out and they were like "we sold that book a long time ago".

    I can figureout almost anything in our nursing classes by referring back to A&P and anatomy. I don't see what was hard about that either. That WAS mainly memorization.

    I'm like sistermike; a positive attitude will take you far. If the instructor sucks, I just go home and get out my nursing journals and read away or get on the internet. I don't freak out about anything and if you don't read before class, well you are just hurting yourself.
    This is a good point. I had a very intensive A&P program so I really didn't have to re-learn things for nursing because a solid foundation was already there. Makes a huge difference in regards to study time and understanding the concepts at the cellular level. Again it definitely gets harder (advanced concepts with fluid and electrolytes/acid-base/cellular patho etc..)but it is doable. (so far at least lol!)
  12. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from RNsRWe
    Well.....all I can tell you is I DO know of what I speak. I saw LPNs fail out, and single people who failed out as well....that wasn't my point. My point was that extraneous activities CAN impact negatively. And the educational background I mentioned impacts how you study: are you already a college grad, used to studying at that level, or did you complete high school 20 years previously and haven't studied since? Issues like that. Actually, our best students DID tend to be those with alot going on, jobs and children included, but it does depend on what kind of support system you have and how you, personally, handle scholastics.

    I found "working" on my kids to be useful, too

    As for no subjectivity, all I can say is how very rare that must be! I never heard of a nursing school that didn't have subjectivity as part and parcel of the process, but then again, none of us knows all that's out there, do we? Hard for me to imagine NOT having subjectivity come into play when it comes to clinicals and skill evaluations, but obviously different schools will do things differently. Probably one of the biggest complaints students have is how very subjective so much of the clinical work is.

    For what it's worth, I also can't imagine any school TELLING you that there IS subjectivity in their clinical grading. It'd be akin to saying "we decide if you should be a nurse or not", and you'll never hear that. I'm pretty sure if I looked through my school stuff I'd see something about how all the grades=pass or fail. But I can absolutely, without question tell you that there were those students with passing grades who did NOT pass clinicals, or skill evals, because of that unwritten subjectivity worked in there.

    Regardless, I wish you the best and hope you continue to have a great experience in school.
    We have checklists in our clinical classes that say what you have to do in order to pass, step by step. I know there are instructors on power trips, ones that will lie, or ones that may just not see you do something. I haven't gotten one of those thank God.
  13. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from CRNASOMEDAY25
    We have checklists in our clinical classes that say what you have to do in order to pass, step by step. I know there are instructors on power trips, ones that will lie, or ones that may just not see you do something. I haven't gotten one of those thank God.
    And boy, I hope you DON'T get one of those! We also had step-by-step, "do these and you pass" skill lists. And most of the time, people passed. And sometimes, unfortunately too often for those of us watching the carnage, the instructor saw a breach of sterile field, or something not done to standard (did it happen? who knows: subjective!), and that was that. That's what I meant about subjectivity: even if they say it isn't there, who's to say you DID do that foley insertion, central line change, trach suctioning perfectly? Certainly not the student: you have no say, they have all of it

    Man, I don't want to sound like a downer, just want those of you who ARE finding it easy thusfar to keep on top of your game, keep your eyes open and be aware that there are usually power plays going on: if you're careful and attentive, you won't get tripped up by them! We need smart nurses

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