Just need some peace of mind...

  1. It's probably just nerves or whatever, but I'm starting a diploma program this week. It's a two year program and after over 4 years of doing the pre-requisites at a local CC, I finally feel like I'm getting somewhere.

    But for some weird reason, I don't feel settled.

    Right now I'm an LPN and I planned on getting my BSN. But for some reason I don't feel comfortable getting the BSN which is why I'm getting the diploma. But now I don't know if I'm doing the right thing. I'm tired of going to school and I just want to get go back to full-time nursing. Am I doing the right thing just settling for a diploma? Should I keep going until I get my BSN? Am I making any sense?
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   iliel
    IMHO i think you should do the BSN. If you're close, you should do that if you can.
    can i ask why you don't feel comfortable getting the BSN?
    I wish you luck!
  4. by   shyne
    If I were you I would go for the bsn, since you're already a lpn. Anyway, do what you feel is best for you, whether it be the adn or bsn program. Good Luck to you!
  5. by   TaraSC
    I think you should evaluate exactly how long and how much time it would take to get a BSN compared to the diploma. Many universities offer a streamlined curriculum for lpn/lvn's seeking a BSN. Also, you should think of what your long term goals are as far as career and education...As we say in the Air Force, "work smarter, not harder."

    Hope that helps
  6. by   B.T.H
    I agree with the previous posters. Think about what direction you want to go in your nursing career later to help you make the right decision about which program to choose. Do you plan on furthering your education? Do you want to get into management or teaching? I think if you plan on going further educationally or getting into management or teaching, then do the BSN. Otherwise if your happy as a "regular"(sorry couldn't think of a better term) nurse then get the ADN. The pay scale is pretty much the same for ADN and BSN. I think the answer to your question is in your future goals in nursing. Good luck on which ever direction you choose. B.T.H
  7. by   camkib
    Originally posted by Monielena
    [B] . Am I doing the right thing just settling for a diploma? B]
    Monielena, I think you've answered yourself right there! If you are "settling" for a diploma IMO you won't be happy with your decision. Go for what you really want. Not because it's better, the same amount of time or any of that, but because it's what YOU want.
  8. by   altomga
    I agree with the other posts here. If you can do it go ahead and get your BSN.
    I got an ADN and now back in school again and working full-time to get my BSN. (b/c of family obligations I could not do BSN previously)

    It sounds like you really want the BSN....think about it...eventually it sounds like you would go back for it...do it now instead of "going back to school AGAIN"
    Good luck with whatever you decide.
  9. by   Monielena
    Originally posted by iliel
    can i ask why you don't feel comfortable getting the BSN?
    I should've made this clear quite earlier, but as of now I'm enrolled in a diploma program. My main concern is whether or not it is worth to continue and get a BSN.

    I think I'm starting to feel this way because of how much of a financial burden it is to pay for school even with the financial aid out there. The diploma program is expensive enough and even if I try to get in the RN-BSN I'd still have to take more classes and its twice as expensive. It could also be because I've been in school for so long and I'm just ready for it to end.

    To be truthful, I don't plan on doing teaching or anything and as of right now I really do enjoy the hands on stuff (minus the paperwork). But you never know what comes your way. So I think that I will pursue the BSN afterwards. And who knows, maybe the MSN too.

    Thanks for the advice so far everyone. I'm starting to feel a little better.
    Last edit by Monielena on Aug 16, '03
  10. by   suzy253
    I'm in a diploma program and I'm just fine with that. My school (diploma) is very heavily clinically oriented. We will get hands on experience within 6 weeks of starting (which will be October). I've heard from several nurses that they can tell the diploma graduates when they come on the wards because of their heavy clinical experience. I've also been told that because of the education and clinical experience you receive in a diploma program you should be very well prepared to pass the NCLEX exam for an RN. This is a small school of the 'old type' school of nursings before they became part of colleges and I'm excited and proud to be part of it.

    Cheers
  11. by   det01
    Originally posted by suzy253
    I'm in a diploma program and I'm just fine with that. My school (diploma) is very heavily clinically oriented. We will get hands on experience within 6 weeks of starting (which will be October). I've heard from several nurses that they can tell the diploma graduates when they come on the wards because of their heavy clinical experience. I've also been told that because of the education and clinical experience you receive in a diploma program you should be very well prepared to pass the NCLEX exam for an RN. This is a small school of the 'old type' school of nursings before they became part of colleges and I'm excited and proud to be part of it.

    Cheers
    Ditto here! In hospitals here the orientation period is much shorter for diploma nurses than for BSN or ADN nurses....they said the diploma nurses come out of school better prepared clinically. (I have even had doctors and supervisors tell me this)

    I do plan on eventually even getting my MSN and hopefully my DSN - but for now the diploma program will be just fine.
  12. by   Monielena
    Originally posted by det01
    I do plan on eventually even getting my MSN and hopefully my DSN - but for now the diploma program will be just fine.
    That's why I decided to go thru the diploma program instead. That and because my local cc thought that LPNs were beneath them. I think in the long run it will help me get my BSN.
  13. by   Dixen81
    I am currently in a diploma program, and I am fine with that. But that is my own personal preference, because a "hands on, bedside nurse" in geriatrics or hospice is what I want to do. However, if you have plans to further your education with the BSN, then I would personally suggest you go that route to begin with. Why go through the diploma AND the BSN? To me, that would seem to be the longer, and in the end, more exspensive route. You may just need more time to think about it and decide what is best for you. Only you know all of your circumstances and considerations.
    Best wishes.
  14. by   Pucci
    Do what you feel is best for you and your family. I was going to a community college for computers, but after 3 yrs part-time, it wasn't for me. I decided that I wanted to do nursing. I know I can make a difference. The comm college had the nursing program also, but my ultimate goals are my msn and dsn, so that's why I switched to a BSN program. If you feel as though you're comfortable with the program you're in, stick with that. Like someone said earlier, they pay is pretty much the same, but I know that I will pursue my master's within two years of getting my BSN. My friend has her ADN and is making verrrrrrry good money and is happy with what she has. I know that you will be too!!

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