impact of nursing studens on RNs.

  1. How do nurses feel about student nurses in the health care setting working with them?? Are they in the way? A help? or what? I would appreciate any input on this topic or where I could find additional information.
    •  
  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   glog
    Funny that you asked that question. I have finished school and just got a job. Through my years in nursing school, I always felt that in most cases nurses on the floor could not stand having students around. I could never understand if it was not having time for us or if it was some kind of initiation rite to treat us like dirt! Anyhow, I'm hoping that in the future I will have the oppurtunity to initiate nursing students into my field. I hope to be understanding, empathetic and to recall how hard it was to be a student. I was fortunate enough to have one of my professors take me under her wings and become an informal mentor. She has encouraged me, counseled me and most importantly transmitted knowledge and enthusiasm for her specialty. In the end we may have to aknowledge that not all nurses are teachers or have the desire and patience to deal with nursing students.
  4. by   Nurcee
    It's ironic how timely your questions are for me personally, as I have had a 'situation' this week. Maybe the staff doesn't "have the time for any of those "d*~!" nursing students to be following them around", but please remember... we are there to learn, and hopefully assist however we can...not be a hinderance. Purposely belittling whatever level of knowledge we have does not accomplish anything positive in a learning enviornment.
    We want to learn!
    Teach us instead!



    [This message has been edited by Nurcee (edited 09-30-98).]
  5. by   vnsn
    Some of the nurses are not willing to take students nurses and be a preceptor to those students. I think it is OK because they have a choice. Plus, the preceptor has an additional responsibility (watch out for you) and taking care of her patients also. I take myself for an example. When I was doing a nursing skill on a patient (starting an IV), I couldn't explain what I was doing at the same time I was actually starting an IV. I need to concentrate, and I can't do two things at a time (explaining and starting an IV). Therefore, I totally understand why some RNs don't want to be preceptor. In addition, the RN is held reliable for your action.
    If you find an RN that is willing to be your preceptor, I think you should be thankful for that, and the RN should be thankful that she has someone acknowledge her specilties. You help her to refresh her skills and she probably learns something from you. Everyone is unique. And we can always learn something from the others based on our mistakes and questions.
    So, a student nurse does add up a responsibility for the RN. The RN learns to challenge her skills during the preceptoship. In the end, student nurse and RN both get a positive reward.

  6. by   sweetpepper
    I've been fortunate I guess to experience both sides of the spectrum in my experience. I've been around nurses who don't have the time or inclincation to help students or to teach and I've also been around some FABULOUS nurses that were willing to take the time to help and teach and reassure you while you were there. It's been my experience that those nurses that are rude or "too busy" to help are usually somewhat burnt out and don't feel like taking the time out of their schedule to help others (sometimes even their own patients!). Those nurses that do take the time to allow student nurses to follow them are usually better nurses and genuinely enjoy their job. I guess the lesson to learn from all of this is how to be the type of nurse that you would want to be around. When you notice other nurses being rude or "eating their young" , let it roll off your back and just try harder to be different. The future of nursing is in the students of today!
  7. by   elkpark
    When I was teaching clinical, I found there were basically three kinds of nurses working on the floors: 1) nurses who enjoyed working with students and were pleasant and positive about adding to their education; 2) nurses who really didn't like having students around and went out of their way to make sure the students felt unwelcome and inadequate, and 3) nurses who liked having students on the floor because they saw this as an opportunity to sit in the break room and look at magazines most of the shift because the students and I would be doing all the work ...

    It was v. easy to figure out which nurses belonged in which group, and I adjusted my assignments accordingly as much as possible! It's unfortunate that more nurses aren't agreeable and positive about having students around (after all, someone took the time and effort to teach us, once!), but the reality is that the instructors can't control the attitudes of the floor staff, just try to work around the "problem" people as much as possible. It iseems to be less of a problem in genuine teaching hospitals, because everyone there (down to the housekeeping staff!) understands that contributing to students' education is an everyday part of their job.
  8. by   Spacklehead
    I have nursing assistants that work with me in the ED who are also student nurses. I would love to be able to allow them to do nursing procedures while supervising them, however, the hospital would frown upon that. I do grab the NA's when there is a new or interesting procedure being done that they haven't seen before so they can observe. I also try to sit down with them and go over interesting rhythem strips with them and teach them how to read EKG's. I only wish I could allow them to do more.
  9. by   AKAKatydid
    Quote from Softballmama
    I have nursing assistants that work with me in the ED who are also student nurses. I would love to be able to allow them to do nursing procedures while supervising them, however, the hospital would frown upon that. I do grab the NA's when there is a new or interesting procedure being done that they haven't seen before so they can observe. I also try to sit down with them and go over interesting rhythem strips with them and teach them how to read EKG's. I only wish I could allow them to do more.
    Softballmamma!! That's wonderful! I actually took a big pay cut recently to work as a nursing assistant so that I could learn and observe more than just on clinical days.

    It's not happening yet - maybe because there are no techs on the floor (keeps you busy as the sole tech on a 26-bed floor!) Or maybe because I'm so new... but hopefully, some of the nurses will follow your lead!

    Goodness knows the pay is awful as a tech, so nursing students that do tech work are there because they want to be there! Nurses, remember this when you've got a student working as a NA on your floor!

    ~*~kendra~*~
  10. by   Altra
    Quote from Softballmama
    I have nursing assistants that work with me in the ED who are also student nurses. I would love to be able to allow them to do nursing procedures while supervising them, however, the hospital would frown upon that. I do grab the NA's when there is a new or interesting procedure being done that they haven't seen before so they can observe. I also try to sit down with them and go over interesting rhythm strips with them and teach them how to read EKG's. I only wish I could allow them to do more.
    I want to be Softballmama when I grow up!
  11. by   meownsmile
    Well on another positive note. I love having students both for precepting and just for clinicals on the floor. I love to take them in and oversee them while they put in a catheter, be there for them when they try a IV start. I dont know what id do without students around. I think having students around keeps us from forgetting where we came from.

    Actually, when i was a LPn student( about a decade ago) my instructor was so comfortable with my skills she used to have me go with my fellow students to help them do new procedures they hadnt ever done. I loved it then too.
    You can be a mentor too, just dont forget where you come from EVER!
  12. by   PamRNC
    I love students! Bring 'em on. We have a group of students who come in on Mondays and Tuesdays, and I am now working with my second SN who has a clinical immersion class - yep she's all mine 2 days a week for the next month! :hatparty:

    I found out while I was in nursing school, that I loved teaching, I worked through the college library as a tutuor and had a grand time. Since then every job I've had, the ones I have been most happy in were the ones I could teach. And it didn't matter who I got to teach, patients, family members, students, colleagues, or docs.

    I always remember how hard it was in the beginning, so much to be responsible for, so much to know, and way too much to worry about. I try to be available, and find stuff either for the students to do or see. Especially important, I try to help the students connect the dots between what we do and why.
  13. by   live4today
    Quote from Alanna
    How do nurses feel about student nurses in the health care setting working with them?? Are they in the way? A help? or what? I would appreciate any input on this topic or where I could find additional information.
    I love working with nursing students! Their energy and their fresh attitude towards nursing is a plus on the units when they come to clinicals. I don't mind their questions at all. They are NEVER in my way!
  14. by   Kudra
    i love teaching and i don't mind looking out for great learning experiences for students... but there are times when it just seems to make things a lot more difficult to have students on the floor... things seem to take longer... plus, it's hard enough having to account for your own work, let alone watching out for someone else's... it can be a huge time sucker...

close