HOLY GOD Tuition is $18,500 a year ! ! ! - page 2

How am i going to pay for this?? Private School is expensive :( I am kind of having 2nd thoughts about school. Might have to wait to get into a state school. The problem is i don't want... Read More

  1. by   litebrite
    WOW, that is a lot!!! i was going to go to a school that was private and $12, 000 a year plus books, uniforms, etc. However, I got into my first choice which was a hospital based school. I paid total less than $15,000 for my entire education-including books, uniforms, etc. I had no debt when i was finished. Do you have to go to that school?? I think I got the BEST education possible and would recommend it to anyone and sure am glad that is what I chose. I wouls look at all your options before you decide.
  2. by   Ortho_RN
    I know some people will tell you that you get a better education from those big expensive schools... That isn't always the case.. Sometimes maybe, but usually its just the Big Name you are paying for...

    Good Luck paying those loans back.. My hubby had 25,000 in student loans and has a job where he makes 60,000/year, but GEESH that $250 each month sucks...
  3. by   betts
    I Would Suggest:

    Benefits Report
    created on May 23, 2003

    IMPORTANT: This information will be lost once you leave the GovBenefits.gov website. You may wish to print this report for future reference.


    Many benefit programs are not featured yet in the GovBenefits.gov web site. The GovBenefits.gov program list is expanding regularly to include more programs. Please check back soon for additional benefits you may be eligible to receive. You should also check back as your own personal situation changes, since this may affect your eligibility to receive benefits.



    Federal Direct Student Loans

    Description
    The Federal Direct Student Loan Program provides loan capital directly from the Federal government (rather than through private lenders) to vocational, undergraduate, and graduate postsecondary school students and their parents.

    Managing Agency
    Department of Education
    http://www.ed.gov/index.jsp

    Program Contact Information & Web Resources
    To determine whether you are eligible to receive assistance through this program, you must first complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which will calculate your effective family contribution. Schools use this information to determine your actual financial aid package.

    You may complete the FAFSA online, through this website:
    http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/

    Additional useful information may be obtained from the U.S. Department of Education, at:
    http://studentaid.ed.gov

    If you have questions about how to complete the FAFSA, you can call the Federal Student Aid Information Center (FSAIC) at this toll-free number:
    800-433-3243


    Federal Perkins Loans

    Description
    A Federal Perkins Loan is a low-interest (5 percent) loan for both undergraduate and graduate students with financial need. The school is the lender. The loan is made with government funds with a share contributed by the school. Students repay this loan to the school. Depending on when the student applies, level of need and funding level of the school, a student may borrow up to $4,000 for each year of undergraduate study up to a total of $20,000, $6,000 for each year of graduate or professional study to a total of $40,000, including Perkins loans borrowed as an undergraduate.

    Managing Agency
    Department of Education
    http://www.ed.gov/index.jsp

    Program Contact Information & Web Resources
    To determine whether you are eligible to receive assistance through this program, you must first complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which will calculate your effective family contribution. Schools use this information to determine your actual financial aid package.

    You may complete the FAFSA online, through this website:
    http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/

    Additional useful information may be obtained from the U.S. Department of Education, at:
    http://www.ed.gov/topics/topicsTier2...g+%26+applying

    If you have questions about how to complete the FAFSA, you can call the Federal Student Aid Information Center (FSAIC) at this toll-free number:
    800-433-3243



    Federal Subsidized Student Loans (Stafford)

    Description
    Subsidized Stafford Loans are awarded to students on the basis of financial need. The borrower pays no interest while in school and during other authorized periods. Stafford Loans are variable interest loans and are generally repaid over a period of no more than 10 years.

    Managing Agency
    Department of Education
    http://www.ed.gov/index.jsp

    Program Contact Information & Web Resources
    To determine whether you are eligible to receive assistance through this program, you must first complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which will calculate your effective family contribution. Schools use this information to determine your actual financial aid package.

    You may complete the FAFSA online, through this website:
    http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/

    Additional useful information may be obtained from the U.S. Department of Education, at:
    http://www.ed.gov/topics/topicsTier2...g+%26+applying

    If you have questions about how to complete the FAFSA, you can call the Federal Student Aid Information Center (FSAIC) at this toll-free number:
    800-433-3243



    Federal Unsubsidized Student Loans (Stafford)

    Description
    Unsubsidized Stafford Loans are not need based. The borrower is responsible for accrued interest throughout the life of the loan. Stafford Loans are variable interest loans and are generally repaid over a period of no more than 10 years.

    Managing Agency
    Department of Education
    http://www.ed.gov/index.jsp

    Program Contact Information & Web Resources
    To determine whether you are eligible to receive assistance through this program, you must first complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which will calculate your effective family contribution. Schools use this information to determine your actual financial aid package.

    You may complete the FAFSA online, through this website:
    http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/

    Additional useful information may be obtained from the U.S. Department of Education, at:
    http://www.ed.gov/topics/topicsTier2...g+%26+applying

    If you have questions about how to complete the FAFSA, you can call the Federal Student Aid Information Center (FSAIC) at this toll-free number:
    800-433-3243



    Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need

    Description
    The Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need program provides fellowships through graduate academic departments, programs, and units of institutions of higher education to graduate students of superior ability who demonstrate financial need for the purpose of sustaining and enhancing the capacity for teaching and research in academic areas of national need, as designated by the Secretary.

    Managing Agency
    Department of Education
    http://www.ed.gov/index.jsp

    Program Contact Information & Web Resources
    Headquarters Office:
    International Education and Graduate Programs Service
    Office of Postsecondary Education
    Department of Education
    400 Maryland Ave SW
    Washington, DC 20202-5247


    202-502-7886

    Web Site Address:
    http://www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/OHEP
  4. by   betts
  5. by   PennyLane
    I see the loans as an investment in my future. After all, I started out my first college career at a $25,000/year school. I transferred after a year to a state school, but still, I don't mind paying for my education. Luckily I have no debt right now except my mortgage, which really isn't that much. I figure a lot of people spend $200/$300+ a month on a car payment, so I think I can swing the student loan payments. Plus a lot of hospitals around here are offering sign-on bonuses and student loan repayment.

    It can be done. I know people who are over $50,000 in debt from a 4 year degree. Even if I were attending school for free, I would still need to borrow at least $25,000/year just to live off of.
  6. by   Bonnie Blue
    After finishing my program at Vandy, I will be 75K in the hole. But, I have my license and my MSN in two years.
  7. by   hobbes
    Originally posted by Mel D
    I see the loans as an investment in my future. After all, I started out my first college career at a $25,000/year school. I transferred after a year to a state school, but still, I don't mind paying for my education. Luckily I have no debt right now except my mortgage, which really isn't that much. I figure a lot of people spend $200/$300+ a month on a car payment, so I think I can swing the student loan payments. Plus a lot of hospitals around here are offering sign-on bonuses and student loan repayment.

    It can be done. I know people who are over $50,000 in debt from a 4 year degree. Even if I were attending school for free, I would still need to borrow at least $25,000/year just to live off of.
    I think if you could argue that paying the extra cash would indeed lead to a greater return in the future, then I could buy this arguement. However, for a degree like nursing, where there doesn't seem to be any monetary advantage (i.e. greater salary) for having gone to a presitgious and/or expensive school I'm not sure. For my first degree in Computer Science I went to one of the best schools in the nation and paid a premium tuition. But, once I graduated, having that school name resulted in more opportunites and more money. I considered that a good investment. I'm now debating about applying to a prestigious (expensive) nursing program, but I honestly can't justify it. I'm the type of person who going to go above and beyond in terms of learning all that I can, so as long as the school is accredited and decent (read: state school) it's probably going to be a better value. Not to mention, graduating with few or no debts leaves the doors open to more possibilities.
  8. by   giggles66
    Hello, Everyone

    As I have said before in my other posts. I really want to get my BSN though I am also looking into getting my ADN. I do not want to have to pay all that money back in student loans. One college which is an all female private Catholic College. The tuition is about $18.000 a year with an enrollment of approx 2000 students and their undergradute nursing class has about 60 students. The other college is a state University the tuition is about $6.000 a year with an approx enrollemt of 12000 students at the colleges main campus with about 110 nursing students. from what I hear, the private college is a little more lient on the courses that they would accept for transfer, whereas the state college is not.

    I Think that I may do better at the private college because of the colleges support system for the nursing students, but I do not know if I can maintain a 3.00 GPA while in the nursing program plus the added stress for the cost of attending. The cost of the State College is to me more finanacially better for me, but the support system is not there as much for the nursing students and the 2.7 GPA is a little lower I think that l may feel alone there. The prerequisites are about the same for both schools give or take a few courses. What Do You Think?

    Carmen
  9. by   nursing 101
    I'm attending a private catholic university $ 20000 a year... With 8000 worth of loans per year. All the state schools in my area now have 2 + waiting list. Private colleges are definately more lenient in accepting transfer credits. All my credits were transfered in. At the state school I applied they actually told me that I was missing english and that I had to take so many classes over. Then on top of it when I would finish my pre-req I would have to apply to their school of nursing with chances of not getting in. They get about 2000 applicants for 600 spots... It's a state college with several campuses (the only state college in the area). Now at the private college I didn't have to go through all of that. May I add the our university has the number 1 n-clex passing rate in the south of our state out of 10 schools.
    I will have to pay off those loans but with so many programs that hospitals offer, repayment of loans is the least of my worries at the moment.
    Yes nursing doesn't offer big bucks but there are alot of majors that don't offer it as well and people still pay big bucks for their degree/education. At least with nursing when I graduate I'm guaranteed a job in less then six months after.
  10. by   peaceful2100
    Just for fun since I am planning on moving out of my parents house in June 2004 anyway, I had my uncle who is a real estate agent run some numbers for me on how much of a house I would qualify for and he told me I would have qualified for a LOT more had it not been for my student loans I will have to be paying back. Because of my student loans it will severly limited me. I have my BSN and my school costs $15,000 a year. I went to a community college for the first 2 years and then transferred in to the private university for the last 2 years. So I only ended up with $30,000 worth of debt unlike my classmates who went there the whole four years have $60,000 or more.

    If you want to spend a lot of time in your life paying back student loans then go ahead. If I could do it over again I would have waited and gone to a cheaper school that was also better around here.

    If the school you are attending is a good school and you REALLY want to go there then go for it.
  11. by   rebel_red
    OK I am a little confused...nothing new there....But as to our original poster...

    Is it feasible for you to take your undergrad classes at a community college? When I was at uni, many folks transferred in their Junior year after taking all their general ed prereqs at a JC (junior colleges is what they were called in CA). They worked with the counselor at thier JC to make sure the general ed/prereqs they took would transfer to the four year university of thier choice.
    In cali there is darn near a JC on every street corner, and they are relatively inexpensive compared to even state unis. They also have financial assistance available either through the gov, private scholarships, corporate scholarships etc....The trick is to make sure all the credits you take transfer to the school of your choice.

    As for me I was 16 when I started college. I had myself declared an emancipated minor. Therefor I was free to accept debt in my own name...I took out loans, used the work study program to defray tuition costs, received grants and went for every scholarship where I thought I had a chance, and my sorority was also a great resource especially our alumni. For pin money I worked as a book scout for booksellers, and combed the thrift shops and flea markets for items that were salable to antique dealers...I ended up with only 2000 dollars of debt out of 4 years at 15K a year. I lived on campus and worked as an RA (resident's assistant) to defray the cost of a dorm room.

    Either way good luck to you all in finding financing for school. It's a shame that money has such a impact when we need nurses....I wonder how many folks want to do this but simply can't from a financial perspective.

    Tres
  12. by   MJ-12
    I guess i forgot to post this but i alrady got most of my credits transfered into the school. I just basically need to go to school for another 2 more years. So the cost should be close to 40K at the end.

    I guess 1 year working 2 FT jobs can pay off that debt

    Originally posted by rebel_red
    OK I am a little confused...nothing new there....But as to our original poster...

    Is it feasible for you to take your undergrad classes at a community college? When I was at uni, many folks transferred in their Junior year after taking all their general ed prereqs at a JC (junior colleges is what they were called in CA). They worked with the counselor at thier JC to make sure the general ed/prereqs they took would transfer to the four year university of thier choice.
    In cali there is darn near a JC on every street corner, and they are relatively inexpensive compared to even state unis. They also have financial assistance available either through the gov, private scholarships, corporate scholarships etc....The trick is to make sure all the credits you take transfer to the school of your choice.

    As for me I was 16 when I started college. I had myself declared an emancipated minor. Therefor I was free to accept debt in my own name...I took out loans, used the work study program to defray tuition costs, received grants and went for every scholarship where I thought I had a chance, and my sorority was also a great resource especially our alumni. For pin money I worked as a book scout for booksellers, and combed the thrift shops and flea markets for items that were salable to antique dealers...I ended up with only 2000 dollars of debt out of 4 years at 15K a year. I lived on campus and worked as an RA (resident's assistant) to defray the cost of a dorm room.

    Either way good luck to you all in finding financing for school. It's a shame that money has such a impact when we need nurses....I wonder how many folks want to do this but simply can't from a financial perspective.

    Tres
  13. by   KristinWW
    My physician BIL went to Emory for his undergrad, and I'm told the tuition is the same for law school. However, I'm also discovering that private school tuition is becoming the same all over. Them's the stakes

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