Higher Learning is very hard to understand - page 3

by NurseGuyBri 2,606 Views | 22 Comments

As I read through many of these posts, I see how some are really knocking some schools because of "transferring". I then noticed that a lot are because the student received an AAS from a tech school. It's important that it is... Read More


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    I think that is why it is important to choose a school that has a reciprocal agreement with your school. Before I started nursing, I did two and a half years of liberal arts at a university. The community college accepted my credits easily. One question that they had was whether PSY 101 was the same as PSY 100. It was, just some schools use different numbers. Keep a copy of your syllabus etc., sometimes you can fight and get credit for previous coursework this way. I learned that in my case management class
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    Quote from NurseGuyBri
    Exactly, nguy- because the tech schools generally award an AAS- Associates in APPLIED Science, which is designed, in ALL FIELDS, to enter directly into the workforce instead of transferring. It's not just nursing. For instance, at a community college- If I was given an Associates in Applied Science for Social Science, the goal would be to enter the workforce and not transfer. Since I received an AS- Associate of Science, then it is much more readily transferred. I'm *SO* happy that you said the piece about research. Although the schools should be more up-front, I am a 100% believer in CONSUMER BURDEN- it's the person going to school/ asking for information that needs to do the research. Too many people rely on others for their information instead of asking themselves.
    It's not just a matter of the "name" of the degree -- it's also a matter of the accreditation (general academic accreditation) of the school. The proprietary tech/voc schools (some of which offer ASNs and BSNs) are generally accredited by their own organizations, which only accredit proprietary schools, and not the regional organizations that accredit "regular" (for lack of a better term) colleges and universities (whether public or private). The proprietary schools are not held to the same academic standards as "regular" colleges and universities, and that's why the classes (individual courses not attached to any particular degree) typically are not recognized and accepted by "regular" schools.
    NurseGuyBri likes this.
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    Quote from elkpark
    The proprietary schools are not held to the same academic standards as "regular" colleges and universities, and that's why the classes (individual courses not attached to any particular degree) typically are not recognized and accepted by "regular" schools.
    ....or all BONs.


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