Forced wearing of nursing cap. - page 9

by onetiredstudent

20,185 Visits | 253 Comments

I'm a senior registered nursing student and our school has a pinning ceremony to mark the completion of our program. Our class contains about 20% men, equal split of black and white in both genders. I am approaching 50 and... Read More


  1. 4
    Quote from Szasz_is_Right
    IMO, this is when nurses actually looked professional.
    I can guarantee you I wouldn't look very professional in a dress, stockings and a cap....
    psu_213, wooh, somenurse, and 1 other like this.
  2. 2
    Quote from Szasz_is_Right
    IMO, this is when nurses actually looked professional.

    When i wore a cap, it was a huge nuisance, hard to keep spotless, and even harder to keep centered on my head with my stethy going on and off, always banged it. Each school has their "own" style of cap, and our schools' cap looked just like a dunce cap. We all hated the shape.

    It's hard to find underwear that doesn't glow under white uniforms. Might not bother some ppl, but, it used to bother me that my underwear was so so visible under most pure-white fabrics. Even skin-color underwear, still visible. Most old time uniforms were made of nylon mixes, and tended to be freakishly sheer, and back then, our tops did not often go past our hips, either.

    I had to get very heavy fabrics to feel whatever shape underwear i had on wasn't showing for everyone to see, and the heavy fabrics got hot, aren't as comfortable for flexing around.

    also, each and every tiny ink dot or blood fleck, that you might not have even realized are on you now, are all so so noticeable in all white.

    I'd rather act and be truly professional, than be unable to accept that today's nurses do look different. Yet, to me,
    they are every bit as professional and well educated,

    as someone running around with a pointy hat on. Today's nurses are often doing incredibly complex work, and deserve respect,
    even if they don't dress exactly like we did eons ago.


    The clothing wore by most professions,
    if you look at the 50s to 80s,
    doesn't look like what that same profession is wearing today. Clothing does change over time. We really don't have to wear pointy hats
    to be respected for doing an intellectually challenging job.
    ....we really don't.

    Most of us nurses have been lauded and appreciated AND RESPECTED DEEPLY now and then, by this patient or that family or this colleague,
    even if s/he was NOT dressed like the kids being "nurses" who trick or treat at my door.

    being a professional nurse,
    involves so so much more
    than what color you wear.


    who knows,
    next generations of the future,
    the future older nurses will be scoffing at the latest trend in nursing clothes,
    "Well, in my day, nurses all used to wear SCRUBS! I am not having this blahblah type of uniform! Doesn't show respect for the previous century of nurse costumes, like i wore!"
    Last edit by somenurse on Dec 13, '12
    wooh and joanna73 like this.
  3. 1
    I am very much a professional, and I'm neatly attired at work. I am also very much a tomboy, and I always have been. Had I been forced to wear a dress and a cap every shift, I would seriously be re-thinking my nursing career. (I already am, but for different reasons). I am not a dress girl, and I never will be. I'm just not comfortable in dresses. To imply that we aren't professional in a dress is discriminatory, since as others mentioned, men don't wear dresses. So why should I have to? Pfft!
    wooh likes this.
  4. 2
    Quote from amygarside
    You could look at it two ways, you can think that it is gender discriminatory or you can look at it in the way that this is a universal symbol of the nursing profession. In this way you can be proud of wearing it without thinking that is shows bias to your gender. I do hope that you would realize it is not only about the gender but the symbol the cap symbolizes for the whole nursing community.
    I always say, "Fair is fair." If men don't have to wear a cap, then the women in nursing shouldn't have to either. Until the last 10-15 years, there were less men in nursing. While it is still largely a female dominated profession, the standards have changed, and times have changed. During the days of the cap, nurses were also more subservient to physicians. I have no intention of ever playing into that role either. The way I was trained, physicians are my equal. I suppose this issue will depend on one's perspective.
    wooh and BrandonLPN like this.
  5. 3
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    I can guarantee you I wouldn't look very professional in a dress, stockings and a cap....

    if i was ever half awake/medicated and woke up in the middle of the night in some hospital,
    to find a nurse dressed like that by my bed,
    i'd probably have to work to stifle a scream! ha ha!!
    I'd probably hear that scarey music that movies use so often.

    (and yes, that used to be me in that exact get-up)
    tayloramaRN2be, joanna73, and wooh like this.
  6. 3
    Quote from Szasz_is_Right
    Or devolved.
    above remark follows this: //"It shows where nursing has been and how far the profession has progressed."//



    How has not wearing what is now often used as a halloween costume, from an era gone by,
    indicate our profession has "devolved"??

    Today's nurses do extremely complex, intellectually challenging tasks,
    that when we were students,
    didn't even exist yet, or fell under "only Drs do THAT",
    YET,
    you put that much store by what a nurse LOOKS LIKE? You are unable to accept, that clothing does change over the decades, and that what EVERY profession wore in the 1950s,
    does not match to the clothing worn by that profession today? For real, if some Doctor making rounds, showed up in a 1950s suit or a 1950s dress, s/he'd be stared at.....
    the way we all stare at a nurse who IS actually wearing an all white dress, white stockings, and lil frenchmaid cap on her head!! It's like something out of a movie, and from another time, almost like a costume.

    but, unless i am misunderstanding your remark,
    you seem to be overlooking alllllllll the advances nursing has made,
    cuz they don't dress like they did in 1950s? It's all about the outfit for you?

    really??


    oh my.
    tayloramaRN2be, joanna73, and wooh like this.
  7. 4
    If someone *wants* to wear a cap, whatever, do what floats your boat. But for a nursing school to demand that it's female students wear one to graduation is silly and archaic. Why have such a policy? Can someone give me one reason? Tradition? Even traditions don't last forever, thank God, and this is one that time has long since passed by....
    Last edit by BrandonLPN on Dec 13, '12
    tayloramaRN2be, joanna73, netglow, and 1 other like this.
  8. 4
    Yes, judges don't have to keep wearing white curly wigs, either. Yet, it was tradition for eons.

    guess today's judges "do not respect their history", eh? since they apparently refuse to imitate their style of clothing of an era gone by.
    tayloramaRN2be, joanna73, wooh, and 1 other like this.
  9. 1
    Quote from Jean Marie46514
    Yes, judges don't have to keep wearing white curly wigs, either. Yet, it was tradition for eons. guess today's judges "do not respect their history", eh? sincethey apparently refuse to imitate their style of clothing of an era gone by.
    Actually I think judges in the UK or Australia or something still wear those wigs. Of course they look like eccentric weirdos, but they still wear them...
    somenurse likes this.
  10. 2
    Quote from Jean Marie46514

    if i was ever half awake/medicated and woke up in the middle of the night in some hospital,
    to find a nurse dressed like that by my bed,
    i'd probably have to work to stifle a scream! ha ha!!
    I'd probably hear that scarey music that movies use so often.

    (and yes, that used to be me in that exact get-up)
    This is the truest thing written on this thread.
    joanna73 and somenurse like this.


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