Condom Teaching Plan for Middle Schoolers? - page 2

Hey all! I am having to prepare a teaching plan involving condom use/safe sex for MIDDLE SCHOOLERS next week during my pediatric school nurse clinicals. I'm a little nervous about this, because back... Read More

  1. by   Jolie
    Quote from cjulian214
    I promise, I am not trying to piss anyone off here.

    This school district is not in my city..I have to commute an hour, its a little town on the border of TX and NM and this area has INCREDIBLY high teen pregnancy rates (including 13 yr olds, etc). This is the first semester they are handing out free condoms and anyone who recieves one has to watch a video about it (they gave me access to these materials).

    I am NOT wanting to do anything such as putting a condom on a banana or anything like that. I am hoping to get away with doing "respect yourself" activities and maybe just play the little condom video at the end (I havent watched it yet, so I'll have to see).
    Sorry. Didn't mean to sound like I was jumping on you. I'm incensed about the situation you are being put in to. Any school that has an active sex ed program for middle school darn well better have an approved curriculum, which they should be making available to you as the basis for your lesson plan. The teacher is the one who knows the students, their level of knowledge and maturity, their education needs, and what the school board has approved in terms of curriculum.

    I can't help but wonder if the condom lesson is new this year due to the distribution program, and the teacher is trying to scum out of having to teach it him/herself. If so, that is just wrong, and you are being taken advantage of. That way when angry parents come in and confront the teacher over an inappropriate lesson, s/he can claim that it was all the doing of the student nurse. Without written guidelines, including the district's policy on condom education, I wouldn't touch this with a 10 foot pole.

    Respect for self and others, yes. Waiting until marriage, yes. The mechanics of condoms, no.
    Last edit by Jolie on Sep 29, '07
  2. by   Alternator81
    You know, I'm a pretty liberal person, but I think those kids are too young to be learning about condoms.
  3. by   luvmy3kids
    Quote from Jolie
    Sorry. Didn't mean to sound like I was jumping on you. I'm incensed about the situation you are being put in to. Any school that has an active sex ed program for middle school darn well better have an approved curriculum, which they should be making available to you as the basis for yur lesson plan. The teacher is the one who knows the students, their level of knowledge and maturity, their education needs, and what the school board has approved in terms of curriculum.

    I can't help but wonder if the condom lesson is new this year due to the distribution program, and the teacher is trying to scum out of having to teach it him/herself. If so, that is just wrong, and you are being taken advantage of. That way when angry parents come in and confront the teacher over an inappropriate lesson, s/he can claim that it was all the doing of the student nurse. Without written guidelines, including the district's policy on condom education, I wouldn't touch this with a 10 foot pole.

    Respect for self and others, yes. Waiting until marriage, yes. The mechanics of condoms, no.
    I agree.
  4. by   greygooseuria
    Wow, I am surprised nobody in this forum shares my opinion, but maybe that is because I am 22.

    When I was in 8th grade, we learned about condoms in middle school. Not how to put them on, just what they are. Then in 9th grade, the student-run anti-HIV/STD committee came around to health class and showed how to put a condom on a DILDO (not even a banana) and I am from Maine. This happens in most HS in southern Maine.

    We all took it seriously and no parents raised a fuss about it. Teaching abstinence is NOT SMART. Kids will still have sex ANYWAY. If you were responsible parents, you would be telling them how to have safer sex now, not to not have sex. And what about gay teens? How do you think it affects them when a school teaches "don't have sex until you're married"?
  5. by   Jolie
    Quote from jbeau
    Teaching abstinence is NOT SMART.

    I respectfully disagree. If abstinence is never presented, then you are not giving the children the full range of options. I agree that contraception education is important also, but not as a substitute for abstinence, and only in the proper setting. Teaching the application of a condom to a mixed-sex group of sixth graders is simply not appropriate.
  6. by   Soon2BPaeds
    Quote from jbeau
    Wow, I am surprised nobody in this forum shares my opinion, but maybe that is because I am 22.

    When I was in 8th grade, we learned about condoms in middle school. Not how to put them on, just what they are. Then in 9th grade, the student-run anti-HIV/STD committee came around to health class and showed how to put a condom on a DILDO (not even a banana) and I am from Maine. This happens in most HS in southern Maine.

    We all took it seriously and no parents raised a fuss about it. Teaching abstinence is NOT SMART. Kids will still have sex ANYWAY. If you were responsible parents, you would be telling them how to have safer sex now, not to not have sex. And what about gay teens? How do you think it affects them when a school teaches "don't have sex until you're married"?
    I totally agree and perhaps it is because we are closer in age to the adolescents but I just finished a placement working with teen moms (some as young as 14) and I think it is VERY NAIVE to think that middle schoolers are not engaging in sexual activity. They may have not all progressed to intercourse but I was talking with some teacher friends of mine and the new fad is girls performing oral sex on their male classmates as young as 12 yrs old! It is so important that we teach these kids how to protect themselves because we can't control them 24 hrs a day!
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Jolie
    I respectfully disagree. If abstinence is never presented, then you are not giving the children the full range of options. I agree that contraception education is important also, but not as a substitute for abstinence, and only in the proper setting. Teaching the application of a condom to a mixed-sex group of sixth graders is simply not appropriate.
    I agree with you - and I've got 3 adult kids. One is waiting until marriage, one didn't wait, one hasn't had the chance (I have a 6 year old too).

    I've been very honest and open with my kids - explained wet dreams to my boys prior to adolescence, etc. Talked about why waiting to have sex is a healthy thing to do. Discussed the possibility of random sex making a baby and what if the girl wants to have an abortion, and you don't believe in abortion? All kinds of scenarios.

    Kids are engaging in sex earlier and earlier (yep, lots of oral sex and during the class I taught, anal sex was mentioned by the girls) . . I agree with the need for open communication, from parents or grandparents. And I want the option to opt my kids out of the discussion in middle school - just because I've already talked to them. Not because kids aren't having sex.

    But using a dildo? I'm not crazy about showing how to use a condom (how hard is that anyway???) . . . . but using a sexual device, a dildo? That cracks me up.

    steph
    Last edit by Spidey's mom on Sep 29, '07
  8. by   greygooseuria
    Quote from stevielynn
    I agree with you - and I've got 3 adult kids. One is waiting until marriage, one didn't wait, one hasn't had the chance (I have a 6 year old too).

    I've been very honest and open with my kids - explained wet dreams to my boys prior to adolescence, etc. Talked about why waiting to have sex is a healthy thing to do. Discussed the possibility of random sex making a baby and what if the girl wants to have an abortion, and you don't believe in abortion? All kinds of scenarios.

    Kids are engaging in sex earlier and earlier (yep, lots of oral sex and during the class I taught, anal sex was mentioned by the girls) . . I agree with the need for open communication, from parents or grandparents. And I want the option to opt my kids out of the discussion in middle school - just because I've already talked to them. Not because kids aren't having sex.

    But using a dildo? I'm not crazy about showing how to use a condom (how hard is that anyway???) . . . . but using a sexual device, a dildo? That cracks me up.

    steph
    I don't like it being presented as "waiting is better". Waiting is fine, as well as having several partners (as long as you're safe and not endangering others). At my high school, we were taught "ok, you can not have sex or you can." The "not having sex" part lecture lasted all of ten minutes.

    If you look at statistics, time and time again it is shown that those programs that focus on abstinence lead to MORE teen pregnancies and STDs. We need to take a step back from our culture (aka religion) and ask why? And the answer is because we are all animals, and our main goal in life is to procreate. Sex is natural and should be viewed that way. I learned about sex in 6th grade when my mom frankly explained it to me.

    And then showed me pictures of STDs. Needless to say, I didn't have sex until AFTER high school
  9. by   smk1
    Send out a permission slip with a basic explanation of what will be in the presentation. Anyone who doesn't want their kid to attend can keep them home. Problem solved.

    P.S I have to agree with whoever said that the school teaching abstinence isn't smart. That is the kind of teaching that should come from home. The kids that need to be targeted with this info are probably NOT the ones who have that teaching coming from home, so a nurse briefly telling them not to have sex when everything else in the world around them says otherwise isn't going to amount to much. Ideally ALL of this type of teaching should come from home, but obviously this is not happening in many homes so I don't see a problem with the school addressing a safety, health issue with students who may need this reminder and information. Again those who don't want their kids exposed can keep them home. (although most of the kids have already been exposed to this info and just have chosen not to tell their parents who think they are still watching Nickelodean lol).
  10. by   cjulian214
    OK everyone, tell me what you think...

    I am trying to incorporate the following ideas into a teaching plan, so help!

    First, I want to have a segment where I split up the kids into a few small groups and have them fill out a short hand out that asks what age they think its appropriate to do things, such as hold hands, french kiss, date, have sex... and then do a short little comparison, discussion...

    And I also like the idea of having the kids split into small groups and write a short script (like, they have 10-15 min) like a teen movie where two people are in a relationship and talking about sex, and then as a group talk a little bit about if the teens talked about sex history, birth control options, etc...and who either started the conversation or pressured the other to have sex...

    I think these two things sort of engage the students attention, and then I can incorporate teaching measures into it. The nurse said I can do the teaching plan over two days or something if I wanted to.

    What do you think and how should I organize it???

    Thanks
  11. by   VivaLasViejas
    The timing of this discussion is rather interesting..........just last night, my 16-year-old son told me that the local police were handing out condoms at the varsity football game! I'm no prude, but I have to admit I was shocked and more than a little disturbed by this---I KNOW a lot of kids his age and younger are having sex, and I know not all parents are as open about these matters as my husband and I were. I'm just not sure I agree with the idea of cops standing around a high-school stadium giving out condoms........it's like we adults are saying, "You're not supposed to be having sex, but we know you're going to do it anyway so here's something to keep you out of trouble".

    I feel very fortunate that my four kids have been, for the most part, responsible about these things. My now-25-year-old waited till she'd been in a committed relationship for over a year (she was 20 when she lost her virginity to the man she is still with); the 22-year-old asked me for birth control when she was 16 and was preparing to make love with a boy she'd been dating for six months; the 19-year-old didn't have sex until he was 17, and he is very conscientious about condom use; and the youngest has been "going out" with the same girl since their freshman year, and they're committed to abstinence till they're out of school.

    No, it's not the picture of virginal perfection, but at least they were taught right from wrong, and despite plenty of peer pressure each of them waited until they'd been in a relationship for some time. So when one of our city's finest hands a high-school junior a condom, it sends a conflicting message..........but MIDDLE SCHOOL?! I think I'd have burst a blood vessel if a teacher had showed my kids how to put on a rubber at an age when they were still building forts in the back yard. I'm sorry you are stuck with this assignment, and wouldn't wish it on anyone; I wish you luck and think that someday when you are a parent, you may very well question why you were made to do this.
    Last edit by VivaLasViejas on Sep 29, '07
  12. by   indigo girl
    Quote from cjulian214
    Hey all! I am having to prepare a teaching plan involving condom use/safe sex for MIDDLE SCHOOLERS next week during my pediatric school nurse clinicals. I'm a little nervous about this, because back when I was in middle school, we giggled when someone said "penis", and at this middle school, they are handing out free condoms and want teaching plans done. Any suggestions on how to present this material to such a giggly, take-nothing-seriously age group? Its a combination male/female group...

    Thanks!
    At first, I was shocked that it was middle schoolers you were talking about.
    But, the more I think about it...

    Reality check, yes, some of them are already engaging in sexual behaviors without benefit of any kind of guidance about safety or pregnancy prevention.

    So, do we ignore this fact?

    In a perfect world, all parents would be responsible for teaching this
    information. But, it is not happening, and statistics prove it.

    Allow parents to opt out, but notify them of what is going to be taught.

    I wish you luck, and bless you for trying to make a difference.
  13. by   NRSKarenRN
    stats: the sexual behavior of young adolescents


    look at this website:


    how do you score?think you know all there is to know about teen pregnancy? take the quiz and find out!

    has great info with video test and questions to ease into discussion about condom use. demonstration of condom can be done with application over 2 fingers---memory i dreged up from health ed clsss.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Sep 29, '07

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