Bilingual or not?

  1. I will be starting school this fall for LPN. I have all of my classes completed, so i only need to concentrate on the nursing classes themselves. I have been advised by several different people including a Doctor to seriously consider taking a Spanish course and becoming fluent while i am in school. Here in Eastern NC, there are alot of Spanish speaking americans. So I was wondering how many of you auctually are taking a language course or are currently fluent in some other language. I have been told that the additional pay is awesome.
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   GPatty
    Where I am from we also have a large influx of Spanish speaking people, so I am taking Spanish courses along with my BSN so I can have a "broader" range of possibilities after I graduate.
    I think it's a good idea.
  4. by   Megsd
    I'm actually 3/4 of the way done with my Spanish BA and plan to go to nursing school (and maybe get my paramedic certification too!) afterwards as a 2nd degree student. Everyone I've talked to seems to think I'm smart for pursuing the Spanish. I'd recommend taking classes and being able to at least communicate on a basic level about the patient's condition. The more you know, the better, I'd say.

    Meghan
  5. by   psychomachia
    Quote from ShellyNC
    So I was wondering how many of you auctually are taking a language course or are currently fluent in some other language.

    I speak "Drunk"...


    It's a well known dialect that is often heard in ERs around the world and usually starts with a denial statement, such as "I schwear I ownleeeee had twoooooo beeeeeeerrrrrrssssss..."

    It's a very strange language in that it can incorporate yelling, swearing, abusive statements, threats, incomprehensible words, excess saliva and uncoordinated body movements along with a distinctive odor that is always present when being spoken.

    If you're lucky, you'll have the opportunity to converse with one of the rare "Happy Drunks" who like to sing their dialect instead of speaking...

    There are no "language" schools to learn "Drunk" because it is strictly on the job training. And of course, no extra money...
  6. by   susanna
    Yah, I am bilingual and am taking Spanish 101 right now too. I am told it is invaluable for the medical field.
  7. by   RedSox33RN
    I'm having a hard enough time trying to speak "A&P1" language! I don't need anything else to take on right now. In my area of the country, the only thing we even remotely see, and it's rare, is French-speaking Canadians. Even that is few and far between, and I remember enough from HS to get me by if I had to.
  8. by   Altra
    Quote from psychomachia
    I speak "Drunk"...


    It's a well known dialect that is often heard in ERs around the world and usually starts with a denial statement, such as "I schwear I ownleeeee had twoooooo beeeeeeerrrrrrssssss..."

    It's a very strange language in that it can incorporate yelling, swearing, abusive statements, threats, incomprehensible words, excess saliva and uncoordinated body movements along with a distinctive odor that is always present when being spoken.

    If you're lucky, you'll have the opportunity to converse with one of the rare "Happy Drunks" who like to sing their dialect instead of speaking...

    There are no "language" schools to learn "Drunk" because it is strictly on the job training. And of course, no extra money...
    Heh heh heh ...
  9. by   IamRN
    I think any additional language is a great thing to have. I am fluent in Spanish and English myself. I have only encountered one hospital that would reward you w/pay for it...and then it was only $0.25 an hour.
  10. by   FsPilotMed1
    Before I got into nursing, I had taken four and a half years of Russian. Not very useful in Indiana, to say the least. So now I'm biting the bullet and enrolling in Spanish 101 in the fall. It was going to have to happen sometime, I reckon.

    D.
  11. by   MishlB
    While Spanish is "the" language to learn nowadays, I dount you will become fluent while in nursing school...it'a almost easier to learn on the job, the medical stuff, and the different types of spanish that are out there.
  12. by   z's playa
    Up here in the Great White North we need to speak French and English. My Spanish is a bonus.
  13. by   ShellyNC
    [QUOTE=psychomachia]I speak "Drunk"...


    It's a well known dialect that is often heard in ERs around the world and usually starts with a denial statement, such as "I schwear I ownleeeee had twoooooo beeeeeeerrrrrrssssss..."


    :chuckle The "Drunk" language would be just about as useful as any!:chuckle
  14. by   Havin' A Party!
    Can speak, read and write Spanish. Took it four years in high school.

    Very useful on the job.

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