Atheist Professers - page 3

:confused: Hi everyone! I'm kind of new here, and I have a question: Right now I'm in A&P and my professor is an all out atheist. I realized when I decided to go the nursing route I would... Read More

  1. by   suzielee
    Its part of a nurses job to accept people of all beliefs-to not judge-and to be respectful and understanding. This includes people who are athiests as well as christians. Walking out of a class just because you dont agree with someones religious views is completely unprofessional-would you walk out on an athiest patient who was expressing their views to you? You need to develop a deeper understanding of the concept of diversity. I would believe this could help you when you graduate. Be respectful of all.
  2. by   Nurse Ker-Ker
    Uh, hello? susielee did you even READ the post? Nobody said anything about walking out on anybody. It was just a little CONVERSATION STARTER, not a DEBATE BOARD! Maybe you shouldn't be so quick to judge me, just because I am a Christian does not mean I am close minded. I didn't even say this was a bad guy I just don't agree with him that's all OK???
  3. by   babynursewannab
    It's very sad that anyone, regardless of their religious belief, should put down anyone else's religious belief.

    Christians, muslims, jews, etc... are pained - as they are trained to be -- when they hear of someone not "believing." Many then go into the "conversion" mode. This is what most have been trained to do....they ARE being good Christians by doing this.

    Atheists, naturalists, wiccans, etc... are pained as well when they get a constant barrage of "God this...Jesus that... you are misled...etc." because they have learned that each person has the ability to know where their own path leads and that it is not of their own right or responsibility to make someone else see it their way. These people tend to adhere to the "have respect, do the best you can do and harm no one in your path" theory. There is no disgust for other religions or beliefs...in fact there is great support of respect for all beliefs...every human needs some way to make it through life.

    Granted there are a few out of every religion that are heinous in their words and actions and in no way represent the majority of their chosen belief systems.

    The only acceptable "statement" imho, when a religious belief is mentioned is "Oh." Then if there are any questions that are not demeaning, they can be asked respectfully for the sake of knowledge....NOT judgement.

    This goes both ways for all "believers" and "non-believers."

    -Alyssa
  4. by   CATHYW
    There is an evaluation to be filled out at the end of the term. Plan on what you are going to write on it. In the meantime, what Renee said...
  5. by   researchrabbit
    I've had lots of school, lots of different subjects (anyone else here ever take Agricultural Economics?), and lots of different personality types. They all have something to teach you, and not all of it will be what's on the class schedule. Take what you need from the class and ignore the rest.

    I had a professor for English Lit who came to class stoned every time. No, I had no respect for him as a person, but he DID know his Proust (and when you consider that Proust wrote sentences so long that you had to go back and reread them just to remember what the heck he was talking about, this is quite an achievement). I learned a lot.

    They are there to teach the subject. Instructors also often feel (especially with younger people) that they are there to expose you to all sorts of different attitudes and situations. Consider yourself exposed and learn from this how you will deal with things like this in the workplace, with coworkers and patients.
  6. by   mark_LD_RN
    if i want to be taught someones religous or atheist views i will take a course on it. he is way out of line and i would make sure he knows it. it is not appropriate for him to promote his beliefs. if it has nothing to do with the course he need to drop it.
  7. by   indeed
    I just want to say that I really doubt that those of you who took offence to this man being openly Atheist, and even expressing his views on Christianity, wouldn't bat an eye if he were a Christian openly expressing his views on Atheism.

    Indeed.
  8. by   Sleepyeyes
    Originally posted by indeed
    I just want to say that I really doubt that those of you who took offence to this man being openly Atheist, and even expressing his views on Christianity, wouldn't bat an eye if he were a Christian openly expressing his views on Atheism.

    Indeed.
    "Openly expressing his views on Christianity" to the point of such offense that students walk out of the class, is religious persecution and uncalled for in any case, in any classroom. Period.
  9. by   eltrip
    Whilst in university for my nursing degree, I had the opportunity to study with professors with very different belief systems, including an atheist. Perhaps it was the professor, but I don't recall a single instance of when the professor's belief system, or point of view about other belief systems became an integral part of classroom discussion. We discussed belief systems once in sociology class, with the professor mentioning his belief system, but it was a statement of fact, not a challenge or opinion.

    Professionalism, I believe, is more the question here. I would not tolerate any professor pontificating about any belief system if it is not part of the course. Even Christians pontificating about Atheists (yes, I am a Christian)...I don't believe such behavior to be of benefit to anyone (save the speaker's ego).
  10. by   indeed
    Originally posted by Sleepyeyes


    "Openly expressing his views on Christianity" to the point of such offense that students walk out of the class, is religious persecution and uncalled for in any case, in any classroom. Period.
    I agree to an extent, but...would you be protesting if it were the other way around? In my own experiences, when that situation is reversed, I hear an awful lot of that "deal with it" mentality. My favorite quote in these situations has got to be "if you don't like it, leave." I'm not saying an Atheist professor should go up in front of his class and spout on about how much he hates this religion or that. But the original poster admitted herself that the professor in question was not saying things that made people walk out of class. She wanted to know how to deal with the PRESENCE of an Atheist professor, which is a valid question...except when you consider that that question is never asked when the professor is Christian or Jewish or whatever. That was my point. And you can cry religious persecution all day long, but if anyone says "I don't like Christianity, I don't agree with it"....that's a statement of opinion. How is that persecuting you? Is it persecuting me to hear someone refer to me as a "confused little individual" because of my beliefs? I don't feel persecuted, perhaps it's a tad insulting, but boo hoo. Welcome to the world. I guess what I am saying is that if you are going to accept Christianity's presence in the day to day life of an Atheist, you need to accept the reverse. And this professor's statement of his religious leanings is not really appropriate, but the great majority of religious beliefs expressed in classrooms are not of the Atheist leaning, and no one seems to be bothered by that (except the Atheists...who are told to deal with it because of majority blah blah blah). Atheists are dealing with it every day, and are getting by without imploding because someone in a position of power over them believes something they do not. Dissenting beliefs DO NOT equal persecution...insulting statements DO NOT equal persecution (they equal ignorance).

    Indeed.
    Last edit by indeed on Aug 9, '02
  11. by   caroladybelle
    Actually Indeed - the aspect of a person's race/religion is considered important and - is ocasionally questioned - by Hitler/Christian Identity groups/Taliban etc. We here in the U.S.A. like to think that the world weighs all of us on an unbiased scale relatedbrains and ability but it just is not true.

    The next time someone puts out " a Jesus is the reason for the Season" sign (ignoring the pagan origins of Christmas, ignoring Chaunakah/Kwanzaa, etc.) or complains that barring a "thank you, lord Jesus" prayer from a mixed tax funded gathering is a violation of their rights - I would love to see how they would react if a eastern religion was brought and celebrated in a public in the same fashion as Christianity. There would be an outcry to be heard everywhere.

    Your professor's beliefs frequently will affect how they teach - he is human - as long as it does not affect your grade, or learning the subject - chill on it. Atheist/nonreligious nurses deal with people blessing them, telling them what good christian nurses they are, having people pray for them on a regular basis.

    This world would be a lot better if people would just calm down and live and let live.
  12. by   Agnus
    Originally posted by Nurse Ker-Ker
    It's just that it's kind of hard to respect someone who denounces Christianity as a "silly myth."
    There are those who would denounce atheism as a silly myth. The person still deserves your respect. You do not have to agree.
    Failing to have respect for some one based on a belief or oponion alone is called bigotry. It is not my intent to name call or step on toes, just trying to get you to think about this in a different light. Perhaps, you never considered this as a bigoted behavior before.

    Disrespect for a deplorable behavior toward others is one thing. This guy expressing his oponion is another. I know there are those who think that any oponion different than their own is deplorable, I also, know this is not you.
  13. by   Sleepyeyes
    Originally posted by indeed


    I agree to an extent, but...would you be protesting if it were the other way around? In my own experiences, when that situation is reversed, I hear an awful lot of that "deal with it" mentality. My favorite quote in these situations has got to be "if you don't like it, leave." I'm not saying an Atheist professor should go up in front of his class and spout on about how much he hates this religion or that. But the original poster admitted herself that the professor in question was not saying things that made people walk out of class. She wanted to know how to deal with the PRESENCE of an Atheist professor, which is a valid question...except when you consider that that question is never asked when the professor is Christian or Jewish or whatever. That was my point. And you can cry religious persecution all day long, but if anyone says "I don't like Christianity, I don't agree with it"....that's a statement of opinion. How is that persecuting you? Is it persecuting me to hear someone refer to me as a "confused little individual" because of my beliefs? I don't feel persecuted, perhaps it's a tad insulting, but boo hoo. Welcome to the world. I guess what I am saying is that if you are going to accept Christianity's presence in the day to day life of an Atheist, you need to accept the reverse. And this professor's statement of his religious leanings is not really appropriate, but the great majority of religious beliefs expressed in classrooms are not of the Atheist leaning, and no one seems to be bothered by that (except the Atheists...who are told to deal with it because of majority blah blah blah). Atheists are dealing with it every day, and are getting by without imploding because someone in a position of power over them believes something they do not. Dissenting beliefs DO NOT equal persecution...insulting statements DO NOT equal persecution (they equal ignorance).

    Indeed.
    Indeed, I was responding to Kaleigh's statement that followed the original post, when I spoke out about persecution. Anyone that is so "ignorant" as to attack a religious belief to the point that students leave the class, is engaging in persecution.
    If not, then what IS your definition of persecution?
    As far as trying to bait me with a silly question like, would we protest if it were the other way around==you hafta be kidding! All one person had to do was holler "separation of church and state" and prayer was outlawed in schools, despite the fact that this is supposed to be a democratic country ruled by the will of the majority--except with respect to religion.
    (I think the real irony there is that the original initiator of that law, atheist Madeline Murray O'Hare, is now dead, and her son is a Christian minister.)
    Never mind that religious diversity in the US breaks down as follows, from the World Factbook:
    Protestant 56%, Roman Catholic 28%, Jewish 2%, other 4%, none 10% (1989)
    The message Christians get is: It's ok to bash Christians and Christianity, and Christians have to take it, but Christians have to uphold the religious freedom of everyone else.

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