ADN to BSN vs. BSN

  1. Hey all, I'm a freshmen in college planning on getting my BSN, but just recently found out you can first get your ADN then later take more classes and get your BSN.

    What are the pros and cons of each? I'm guessing that both take the same amount of time, but is one more difficult then the other?

    I was also looking at the online ADN to BSN programs and was thinking how cool it would be to work as a nurse while I get my BSN. Anyone have any experience with this?

    I'm just starting my research but if anyone has anything else to add feel free.
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from ghaleon128
    Hey all, I'm a freshmen in college planning on getting my BSN, but just recently found out you can first get your ADN then later take more classes and get your BSN.

    What are the pros and cons of each? I'm guessing that both take the same amount of time, but is one more difficult then the other?

    I was also looking at the online ADN to BSN programs and was thinking how cool it would be to work as a nurse while I get my BSN. Anyone have any experience with this?

    I'm just starting my research but if anyone has anything else to add feel free.
    If you have the opportunity, then go straight for your BSN. This will save you time & money in the long run.

    However, nothing wrong with becoming an ADN and later pursuing BSN via RN-BSN online program. First, I completed AAS in Surg Tech [1995], then AAS in Nursing [ADN 1998], and finally BSN via RN-BSN online program with UTMB Galveston, School of Nursing in 2004 while working +40 hours/week as an OR RN at Seton Medical Center, Austin, TX. If I could do it all over again, I'd go straight for BSN. Yet, at each point in time I needed employment so I took the shortest route, but was actually the long route when you look at the entire picture.
  4. by   Tweety
    Hi! They both are very difficult programs, both graduate and take the same NCLEX. However, the BSN has more co-req courses that ADNs don't take you would take later in an ADN to BSN program like research, community health, pathophys., pharmacology, leadership among others depending on where you go to school.

    The BSN might be slightly more time consuming in this respect.

    The advantages are many employers have tuition reimbursement and you can get help to pay for it. My employer is paying $2400 per calender to me. Also, you can work full time while going ADN to BSN.

    The disadvantages is time lost. ADN programs nowadays require so many pre-reqs that it takes about 3 years to get. Then add another 18 to 24 months on top of that to finish your BSN.

    Also you might find yourself like me, getting involved in working, making money, other priorities, working overtime, and finding yourself 47 years old and wanting a BSN.

    My advice would be to get the BSN now, if you have that opportunity since that is your goal.

    But the ADN route is a good way to go. You have to decide what's best for you, your budget, and your lifestyle situation.

    Good luck!

    BTW, at first there is no pay difference between ADN and BSNs, or maybe a small differential. The BSN offers advantages later on down the line.

    I am currently taking my RN to BSN 100% online and loving it. It's an NLN-approved program, tough and demanding and I'm learning a lot. I love the convenience of doing it online.
    Last edit by Tweety on Oct 1, '06
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    I agree with Tweety - do it now!

    Good luck.

    steph
  6. by   marilynmom
    Your young, get your BSN now, don't wait for later because as anyone can tell you, things happen, you get busy working and it's harder.

    So go for your BSN.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I am with Tweety, Steph et. al. who say go straight for your BSN if you can. If you cannot finance that now, however, consider and look into getting an AD and later on, finding an employer who will pay for you to continue your studies later. Some offer EXCELLENT tuition reimbursement!
  8. by   HeartsOpenWide
    It will take you longer if you go ASN and then bridge vs going straight through for a BSN.
  9. by   ghaleon128
    Thanks for all the replies, really helpful. I'll probably just go for my BSN now that it seems like it's quicker
  10. by   Tweety
    Good luck to you!
  11. by   michar
    After pre-reqs It takes 4 semesters in my program to get my BSN. With this program close to me there was no way I was going to take the same amount of time to get my ADN. Especially when I'm planning on going back and getting my Masters.
  12. by   Tweety
    Here is some further information on the topic. http://allnurses.com/forums/f8/have-...ad-180528.html

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