Accepted to BSN & ASN program... which one?

  1. I just received a letter of acceptance from our local CC to begin their Nursing program this fall. :hatparty:


    Problem is: Last December I was accepted into a BSN program at the local state college's fall Nursing program.

    I am confused which one I should go for and need to make up my mind ASAP so someone else can use my spot. There are benefits to both. I have a previous AS degree in Radiologic Technology, so the BSN would be great for me.

    If I go with the AS degree, I will be working as a Nurse two years sooner and will have a much lower Stafford loan to pay off after graduation. Then I figure I could do an online BSN program and possibly get tuition reimbursement.

    I am so thrilled to have been accepted to both programs. Any guidance, thoughts or suggestions would be much appreciated.
    Thanks!
    Michelle
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   LadyT618
    Quote from MichelleinMA
    I just received a letter of acceptance from our local CC to begin their Nursing program this fall. :hatparty:


    Problem is: Last December I was accepted into a BSN program at the local state college's fall Nursing program.

    I am confused which one I should go for and need to make up my mind ASAP so someone else can use my spot. There are benefits to both. I have a previous AS degree in Radiologic Technology, so the BSN would be great for me.

    If I go with the AS degree, I will be working as a Nurse two years sooner and will have a much lower Stafford loan to pay off after graduation. Then I figure I could do an online BSN program and possibly get tuition reimbursement.

    I am so thrilled to have been accepted to both programs. Any guidance, thoughts or suggestions would be much appreciated.
    Thanks!
    Michelle
    Sounds like you got a lotta soul searching to do. But honestly, I would really go for the BSN, since you're gonna have to get it anyway, if you want to move up in the nursing world. Yes, you're loans will be more, but you certainly wont' be a pauper. It will be well worth it!! And you have a degree already on top of that. This is coming from a person with a BS in another field and wish they had gone for a BSN program instead of the ASN. Good Luck!!!
  4. by   mitchsmom
    I always say do the BSN if you are able - open as many doors as possible for your future. You never know what you may decide to do later on and you won't have to go back for it! Or, if you do decide later after starting your nursing job that you still want to go back to school after the BSN, you'll be all set to go for your Master's which will probably be a bigger leap career-wise than the BSN would have been at that stage.
    Last edit by mitchsmom on May 6, '04
  5. by   suzanne4
    I would go for the BSN, if you are able to..............
  6. by   need2be
    Hi, almost same situation as you. First I was not accepted into two cc's I applied to. But got a call and letter from one of them saying they had some spots left and if I was interested. I said yes, and I have been accepted for the fall. Talk about emotional roller coaster. I also applied to a private college for a bsn got in and was going to go until I heard from cc. The way that I look at it is if I go to the private college I am looking at a LARGE student loan, I go to cc no student loan. If I go to private college I will need to complete about 64 credits for my bsn. If I go to cc I only need to complete 33 credits for my associates. Also at cc I will only have to take 8-9 credits a semester compared to 14 credits at the private college. I will still pursue the bs degree after I become and rn, then my place of employment can help me with the tuition.
  7. by   mariessas_mom
    Personally, I would go for the BSN now. I know your loans are more, but there all kinds of programs out there for new R.N.'s. Loan forgiveness in some states if you go to work for certain hospitals. Some hospitals will help with loan repayment if you sign a contract. Plus, you were qualified enough to get into two programs, that may qualify you for scholarships as well! I say, take a few days, do some research in your community and make a list of pros/ cons of each before you decide. In my area, it would take me about 6 years total to get my BSN if I got an ADN first. As it is, 4 years if I go straight through (and 2 are done). For me time spent was more costly to me than money!


    Good luck in any decision you make!
  8. by   meandragonbrett
    I am in the same situation as you!! I knew I was in at the BSN program but money was an issue so I applied to the local CC (not thinking I would get in). Well low and behold two weeks ago I get a letter stating that I was accepted to the communit college. Talk about putting a kink in your plans, huh? After lots of soul searching and talking with various mentors, I decided to go ahead with the BSN program. Mostly because if I stayed at the community college....I'll have spent three years there and come out with an AD (I've already done a year of prereqs)...Whereas I can spend one more year (than it will take me to get the AD)at the BSN program and have the BSN...one year's difference is all there is. Not to mention that I've had my heart set on this university since I was little! Finally it clicked "What am I thinking? Why am I considering going to XXXXXXX Community College when I can go to XXXXX University?" Good luck with your decision and spend some time thinking about it. Don't let the costs of the two different programs affect your choices. Go where you think you'll be happier and where you'll get the better education. Good luck and let us know what you choose
  9. by   GracefulRN
    OK to me it sounds like you want to get your BSN eventually, so I say there's no time like the present. I agree with the poster who suggested a pro/con list, because when it comes down to it only you can decide what is ultimatly best for you. That being said, I think you will regret not just going for it now. Nursing is such a dynamic profession and I would hate to see you limit yourself. Now before you ADN students get angry I am in no way implying that ADN's are inferior to BSNs, they are both competent providers with(to my knowledge) the same scope of practice. I am just saying that if you don't do the BSN now and later you decide to go for your Masters you will be kicking yourself for passing up this opportunity.
  10. by   Spoiled1
    If you go from ADN to BSN, do you have to work before?? Here in NC there are some schools where you can a BSN in a year.
  11. by   jenrninmi
    Well, I'd say, go for the BSN. But it's also very important to look at both of the programs. What are each of the programs NCLEX exams scores? What are each of the programs graduation rates? How much clinical time do you get with each? All important questions. Think long and hard about it. Congratulations, by the way for getting accepted to both!
  12. by   CaliNurs06
    I was in the same position...I took the BSN route. GET IT ALL OVER WITH!!! I know myself too well that if I took the ADN route, I would procrastinate to get my BS.
  13. by   manna
    If you can afford it (monetarily and timewise), I'd so go for the BSN now. It's certainly not going to hurt, right?

    Good luck making your decision.
  14. by   JudithL_in_NH
    I was in a very similar situation last year: already have a BA, accepted into the BSN program at a private college (would take 6 semesters to complete at this particular college, even with my BA) and the ADN program at the local tech (would take 4 semesters to complete).

    The ADN won out because the total tuition was $44,000 lower (!) and the NCLEX pass rate was 10% higher than the BSN program.

    I work at a hospital now, and they said they'd foot the bill for RN-to-BSN (with on-site instructors from the Univ of NH) if I continue to work for them--it would take me two additional years part-time--or--they'll do tuition reimbursement for me to go to UMass (45 minute commute) and get my MSN (probably three years part-time).

    Just seems like a whole lot better deal to pay less for the RN, get experience, and have someone else foot the bill for the advanced degree!

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