Why do RN's with ASN and BSN make the same? - page 2

In most other careers those with Bachelors make more then those with Associates, and I don't quite understand why it is different in nursing???? Can someone please clear this up, thanks :)... Read More

  1. by   DelightRN
    My facility has tuition advancement, which makes the reimbursement argument a moot point. I think education benefits us all... nurses, as a profession, and certainly our patients.

    And to answer the OP's question, there are many facilities (mine included) that include an additional differential for further education (i.e. BSNs make more than ADNs). That's not the reason I'm going back for my BSN, but every little bit helps.
  2. by   KrisRNwannabe
    Probably because they are the same nurses and do the same job. They take the same boards. there is such a big deal made about having a BSN but if you are taking the same boards you are being tested on the same material so what difference does the degree make?
  3. by   DelightRN
    Different people will have different answers to that question. For some people, its the possibility for advancement into management or other areas of nursing that require BSNs or greater; for others, its education for its own sake. And then some people don't think it matters at all.

    Above all, you have to do what's right for you.
  4. by   ayndim
    Quote from RN34TX
    Some people think that may be true but I can tell you first hand that it is the most expensive and time consuming route to go.
    And don't be lured into the "your employer will pay for your BSN" routine.
    Not all do and those that do often have a LOT of strings attached, such as the tuition reimbursement plan. If I had the money to begin with, I would have just paid for it, I don't need to be reimbursed later, I need it now.
    Oh I don't plan on doing it that way. But in my area most seem to pay upfront for ADN to BSN. One hospital actually has a hospital come to the hospitals classroom for the BSN. That is our only Magnet hospital in this area. Not sure if that really makes it better to work there or not. But the nurse seem real happy there (I had 2 of my kids there).
  5. by   redwinggirlie
    Because we all do the same job
  6. by   jaimealmostRN
    Since we take the same NCLEX (as do Diploma grads too) its the same. In my area, I know of only 1 hospital that pays more ($750 extra a year). But most union hospitals don't allow it...(b/c same duties, title,etc.)
  7. by   smile123
    Quote from jaimealmostRN
    Since we take the same NCLEX (as do Diploma grads too) its the same. In my area, I know of only 1 hospital that pays more ($750 extra a year). But most union hospitals don't allow it...(b/c same duties, title,etc.)
    I agree with JaimealmostRN. If you get a job in a hospital, you will be part of a union. It's totally based on seniority and the fact you passed the NCLEX, not what degree you have (AD vs. BSN). However, if you were in a clinic with a group of physicians, you can negotiate on your own since there's no union.

    Unions can protect you because you are part of a group but they can also hinder your individual career. They do the collective bargaining for wages. But you won't get any merit pay for doing a stellar job. When I questioned some RNs about this, they said there are other ways to enhance your salary. If you are doing a stellar job and are a team player, when you put in for additional shifts or more favorable ones, you would have "points" in your favor. This in turn, could give you more hours, perhaps higher pay because you get more differential pay, and as a result earn more money during the year.

    However, here is a story a RN told me which breaks this theory: There was a RN who was not stellar, not a team player, BUT she volunteered for the "worst" shifts (working 3 or 4 weekends/month, holidays, or nights). (She was single, so she didn't have any family to worry about for scheduling.) She ended up getting so many shifts (the unfavorable ones) that the administration eventually gave her "good" ones as well. She made a ton of money that way. That RN was the exception to the rule.

    But for most of us in this field, the money isn't the primary driver, is it? Hopefully, it's the gratification to help our patients get well!

    Smile123
  8. by   DelightRN
    I think its interesting that you assume all hospitals are unionized and all nursing positions are static (i.e. no lateral or vertical moves). Many hospitals in this country are not unionized, and having a BSN can make a difference in advancement, hourly wage, and where a person might be on a clinical ladder.
  9. by   Gompers
    I agree with the nurses who simply stated, "Because we do the same job."

    My hospital pays maybe $1/hr more for BSN, nothing crazy. In my experience, the nursing education is almost identical between ADN and BSN programs, so why should the pay be different? The job is the same. We're all RNs and take the same boards. The only difference is that BSN students take classes in many other subjects and have a more well-rounded, deeper education overall. But as far as nursing classes go, maybe there's a little more focus on research and management, things like that, but nothing too different. Actually, all the ADN grads I know did ICU clinical rotations in school, and none of the BSN programs around here do that.

    BTW, I'm a BSN.
  10. by   infullbloom1
    This is good info- I'm a soon-to-be LPN and can't decide between going for another year for the RN or continuing for a BSN. I already have a B.S. is Sociology/Criminal Justice and am not that enthusiastic about getting another Bachelors, particularly if they pay is the same as an RN. SOunds like I'd be better off sticking to the RN path...
  11. by   Gompers
    Quote from infullbloom1
    SOunds like I'd be better off sticking to the RN path...
    Unless you have any interest at all in going into management or nursing education later on in life. Yes, you can always go back to school, but many people never find the time. So if those areas definitely interest you, go straight for the BSN right away to ensure more options down the road.
  12. by   renerian
    Alot of companies pay the same in home health for the different degrees. That is one reason why I got my BS/MS in something else. I could not bear taking another nursing degree. Now I have two other degrees I love working on and getting.

    renerian
  13. by   BETSRN
    Quote from infullbloom1
    This is good info- I'm a soon-to-be LPN and can't decide between going for another year for the RN or continuing for a BSN. I already have a B.S. is Sociology/Criminal Justice and am not that enthusiastic about getting another Bachelors, particularly if they pay is the same as an RN. SOunds like I'd be better off sticking to the RN path...
    I agree. Just get your RN. You can always go back at a later date if you decide you need the BSN. otherwise, just enjoy being an RN. Get your RNC at a later date if you want to advance yourself.

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