Why are RN's so fat! - page 7

I was told by a nanny last night that her employer just had a baby, and she commented on how fat the RN's are at the hospital (Her employer is thin). Her employer stated that "being RN's... Read More

  1. by   muffie
    it's all about accepting yourself and the body you have and to heck with what other people think
  2. by   nursemike
    As others have noticed, threads on nurses and obesity inevitably turn ugly, and I suppose I'm not helping, but I have to say I notice a strong Puritanical tendency in our society, and a rather neurotic fascination with the shortcomings of others. It can get truly ridiculous, at times. I've heard 300lb. co-workers speak of 500lb patients and say, "If I ever get that fat, somebody just shoot me." I've seen weekly binge drinkers criticize smokers--and vice versa.
    I have never had a patient comment that I was hypocritical when I teach them about diet, exercise, or smoking cessation. I don't preach at them--I explain the facts, ask about their goals, and discuss strategies toward achieving those goals. The thing is, I think my patients can see that I'm not just talking to make myself feel better about myself. With all my obvious flaws, I'm happy and I do feel good about myself. I would never consider telling a patient he or she was just too lazy to lose weight. I tell them it's better not to get overwhelmed by the need to lose a hundred pounds, but rather to focus on eating right today and losing 1-2 pounds this week. I tell them not to even consider trying to run five miles a day, but to try to work up to walking a mile a day. And I don't for one single moment imagine that my teaching is going to turn their life around. I just think hearing a positive message from time to time may gradually encourage them to try some ideas on their own.
    I'm a fairly new nurse, but I'm not such a new person, and my nursing experience and life experience both persuade me that a good nurse has to be a realist.
  3. by   nursemike
    Quote from muffie
    it's all about accepting yourself and the body you have and to heck with what other people think
    Well, sure, if you want to be succinct about it.
  4. by   GardenDove
    Quote from TrudyRN
    It is more than laziness. It's working full-time and more than full-time, it's having a family to care for in addition to the job, it's having to be homemakers in addition to working and childrearing, it's depression, it's hormone fluctuations, rotating shifts, dealing with car uipkeep, tax returns, summer plans for the kids, and many things. . Etc.

    Exactly, many friends of mine who are overweight are that way because of these reasons, and are not in any way lazy people. They live in a 24/7 car dependent nation where you have to drive to everything, and junk food is the cultural norm.
  5. by   MoriahRoseRN
    My husband is quite overweight, and he went to the VA clinic for a physical and a nutrition consult. The nutritionist went over some ways my husband could improve his diet, portion control, better food selection, exercise etc. My husband came back from that appt. commenting on how the nutritionist was over weight himself and had a box of fried chicken and biscuits sitting over on the counter waiting for him until he could have it for lunch. We all make mental judgements about everything we see, do and hear whether we're concious of it or not. Did my husband throw all of that advice out the window? No, because he knew for his own personal health and benefit he needed to do something about his weight and high BP.

    While in nursing school one other student commented that I look like a nurse. I was flattered (I didn't know any better). Later I found out that she thought I fit the nursey profile because she felt so many nurses are overweight (fat). I didn't lose weight right away, but I never forgot that, and when someone makes comments like that, it only challenges me to make some changes.

    Really, who in their right mind wants to be over weight. Losing weight has the biggest challenge of my life, much harder than anything I've ever done and that includes going to nursing school with four kids.
  6. by   Danish
    I guess I just have to accept it then Ive been in nursing school for 8 mo and Ive gained about 20lbs...I thought I would loose it once I graduated and was working full-time.
  7. by   GardenDove
    About overweight nurses making comments about even more overweight nurses, I've noticed that myself and I wondered about that. We have a not very well liked gal who is definately extremely morbidly obese. She's not well liked because of some personality traits unrelated to her excessive weight. But, I've heard some otherwise really cool co-workers, who are more than just chunky themselves, comment pretty scathingly regarding her weight. These are people who are quite overweight.

    I know they do it because the gal is obnoxious and mean sometimes, but still here I am a normal weight person, and I wouldn't focus on that myself, even though I don't like that gal.
  8. by   DutchgirlRN
    I would have asked why it makes any difference? Did she receive good care from skinny nurses? Bad care from fat nurses? Why make such an ignorant statement? There are skinny and fat people in virtually all professions, why single out nurses?
  9. by   Alexsys
    I think the weight issue could pertain to anyone. I have seen some overweigt doctors, attorneys, dentists..etc.. . I dont think that one job class alone can answer the weight question. My weight never went over 135. I think that is an OK weight for me since I am five foot seven, but another thing to consider is that I dont have to cook for anyone else but myself. When someone has a family, the children mainly take priority over themselves. If someone is slightly overweight and are able to function as an RN, then the care they provide should be important, not their weight.
  10. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from Alexsys
    If someone is slightly overweight and are able to function as an RN, then the care they provide should be important, not their weight.
    Some of the best nurses I know, myself included, are 100+ pounds overweight. Slightly overweight would = skinny to me.
  11. by   Jules A
    Quote from TrudyRN
    It is more than laziness. It's working full-time and more than full-time, it's having a family to care for in addition to the job, it's having to be homemakers in addition to working and childrearing, it's depression, it's hormone fluctuations, rotating shifts, dealing with car uipkeep, tax returns, summer plans for the kids, and many things. . Etc.

    I agree that its not about laziness but I really don't see where these things should lead to overeating. Depression possibly but dealing with car upkeep? So eat a greasy fast food lunch? I don't get it.

    How/when does food become a
    Reward?
    Friend?
    Companion?
    Comfort?
    Stress reducer?

    I wonder if it is something some people reach for as others choose alcohol or smoking? I'm sure there is more to it and I don't mean to be simplistic but unless it is a true addiction I think a big part of conquering it is totally changing your outlook and attitude about food. It isn't your friend, lover, Mom or soother...its fuel for your body. Thats about all.
  12. by   Tweety
    Quote from Jules A
    I agree that its not about laziness but I really don't see where these things should lead to overeating. Depression possibly but dealing with car upkeep? So eat a greasy fast food lunch? I don't get it.

    How/when does food become a
    Reward?
    Friend?
    Companion?
    Comfort?
    Stress reducer?

    I wonder if it is something some people reach for as others choose alcohol or smoking? I'm sure there is more to it and I don't mean to be simplistic but unless it is a true addiction I think a big part of conquering it is totally changing your outlook and attitude about food. It isn't your friend, lover, Mom or soother...its fuel for your body. Thats about all.
    There are a lot of things I don't get. I don't get why my spouse choose booze over me. I don't understand why the COPD patient still smokes. There's a lot of things I don't get in this world.

    I just have to live my life the best I personally can, help wherever I can (when it's warranted and appropriate) and not judge to harshly people I just don't get.

    Unfortunately, or fortunately, I do "get it" and understand that for some people food is more than fuel. Yes, you're absolutely right, some of us use food the same way some alcholics and smokers do.
    Last edit by Tweety on Mar 4, '07
  13. by   Julie frm Dallas
    Reminds me of a thread I read at the SDN...a doctor had posted asking how to get the nurses to like him...another doctor replied "give 'em donuts" this was followed by even more degrading posts from doctor's/med-students about overweight nurses and their lifestyles...sad.



    Quote from MoriahRoseRN
    I was told by a nanny last night that her employer just had a baby, and she commented on how fat the RN's are at the hospital (Her employer is thin).

    Her employer stated that "being RN's shouldn't they know how to control their weight"? I told the nanny that yes, but RN's have a very stressful job. They are over worked, have odd hours, and tend to eat bad food to comfort themselves because the amount of stress they are under. Usually we are understaffed and don't get breaks, and when we do leave work normally we as RN's tend to reach for junk, because high sugary foods bring up the blood sugar the quickest. I was quite offended at her comments, not because I am fat (I am not exactly slim either), but because it is a generalization of the profession. I don't know what her point was to even repeat what her employer said. However, I'm determined not to fall in that category, because I once was fat (I lost approx 61 lbs & still want to lose about 30lbs). Does that comment offend you?

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