Why are Newbies Such Whiners? - page 7

catchy title, eh? right up there with "why are nurses such backstabbers" (assuming that all nurses are backstabbers) and "nurses eat their young" and "why are nurses so mean?" i don't know about... Read More

  1. by   DeeDee143
    Well... i couldnt resist replying to this topic.

    I am currently a student and I just personally think that there was nothing wrong with what you told the student.Thats just common sense in my opinion.Why would you give a antihypertensive if the BP is alread,y low? Are you trying to kill that person!!!! Thats like giving Digoxin when the HR is 55!!! Thats is a quick way to lose your license before you get it.When you have a persons life in your hand you cant fool around

    I have personally seen and experienced some nurses being snappy and straight out mean to students as if we are suppose know what they know. On my first day of being a CNA I got yelled at by a RN for not putting a Dementia patience legs close to the siderails so he wouldnt get out of bed!!!Now how am I suppose to know that.School didnt teach me that , that comes with experience.As a student and CNA I know how the nurses are busy passing meds, starting IV's,new orders, etc. but you have to understand that once upon a time you were in school too and once new in the profession as well. And these are the future nurses who may be taking care of you someday and also taking you spot once you retire.So be patient with some of us. I agree with the lady above there are a few bad apples in the bunch.But there are some good ones out there.
    Last edit by DeeDee143 on Jan 10, '07
  2. by   Sugar9486
    I'm not trying to defend the student nurses, I'm just giving my opinion about young student nurses and why they act the way that they do. I do not agree with the student nurses who feel they are being treated badly when in fact the preceptor is just trying to help them, sorry if I came off the other way. I totally agree with what rubyvee had to say, I was just giving insight into why I think they act this way. I know that if I understand why someone acts one way, I am more likely to brush it off. I also needed to vent about

    Quote from nursemike
    There are two sides to every story, but I'm trying to take what anyone posts pretty much at face value. It's hard to dispute that some poeple have had some pretty bad experiences in nursing, and I think it may be more helpful just to let someone vent than to defend the ones they're venting about.

    Which isn't to say I endorse or approve Ruby's thread title, but I have to admit, as a 2nd year nurse, I've actually shaken my head in dismay over some things I've seen 1st year nurses do. Sheesh! Pass the A-1 Sauce!
  3. by   PANurseRN1
    It's interesting how the new nurses beg and plead for experienced nurses to have patience with them, but feel they shouldn't need to be understanding of their experienced colleagues when they're having a bad day.

    You put impossible standards on the experienced staff. One day, you will be the experienced nurse and will understand just how difficult a position it is.
  4. by   pedsrme
    I am currently a nursing student, but i have been in the medical profession for a while. What i get tired of myself is 18 and 19 yr olds in class with me that do not understand why there is so much work involved in school. As far as seasoned nurses being mean, I have been to several clinicals and i have not seen that myself, but maybe i have been lucky.......who knows
  5. by   nursesaideBen
    Quote from Sugar9486
    I am young (20 years old) and I am a newbie, and I have to say that I totally agree with you! Some of the stories I have read on here have sounded like the preceptor was totally horrible, but is that the student nurse exaggerating or telling something along the lines of what really happened.

    My impression is that it is a generational thing. I only see this behavior in student nurses that are around my age, and I think it has a lot to do with the generation in general. Even in school I see this all of the time ( I am not trying to insinuate that everyone who is "younger" is like this by any means, and I am not trying to offend anyone either) the students who are right out of high school don't seem to care about anything that they are doing. They sleep, leave, send messages on their phone, go in the hall to take phone calls repeatitively, and are just plain disrespectful to the professor trying to teach the course. Nursing was not my first major, I was going to school for Criminal Justice and I see now that I was one of these fresh out of high school students who didn't have a care in the world. When I decided that nursing was what I wanted to do my entire outlook changed. I realized that this is going to be my source of income and a big part of my life and that it is very important. When i was still taking my pre req's after my first semester I refused to take classes during the day if I did not need to because these were the classes that had the younger students. If I took evening classes I was with the slightly older crowd that knew what they wanted. I don't know how though that these students have made it to clinicals, I know my anatomy classes cleared out MANY of them who were not focused on what they wanted. (We started the semester with 78 students and only 24 attended the final) Hopefully these students figure out what they want and that the preceptor is trying to help them.. and that the world doesn't revolve around them? I'm sorry if I offended anyone, thats really not what I was going for


    I have to agree with you! I'm 18 a CNA and I graduate LPN school this May. A few other students are around my age and anything that our instructor says or does a couple of the students automatically think that she's trying to degrade or insult them. If they fail a test it's out instructor's fault for not going over the material, if she offers constructive criticism: she's being a b*tch, etc. The negativity gets irritating after a while to the point you just want to SCREAM! I have heard the saying that "nurses eat their young" and sometimes I think it's true but I also think that SOME younger people need to grow up, get over themselves, and realize that they DO NOT know everything. If you don't know something, just ask, don't pretend like you know the answer. If you're not sure if you should give a drug just ask, there are no stupid questions, the only thing stupid is NOT asking the question and risking your patient's health, your job, and your license.
  6. by   NurseWhiteRN
    [MOUSE][/MOUSE]
    Quote from newbiern2006
    Thanks, I appreciate the encouragement - [BANANA]but "go look it up" could never work in today's environment where hospital stays are shorter and, consequently, patients are sicker than they were a couple of generations ago. I literally don't have time to "go look it up" - my patients need my attention NOW, not after I take 15 minutes or half an hour to "go look it up." [/BANANA] Even though I am barely managing my own patients' care, I never, ever turn down a request for help from another nurse or aide, I don't think I'm asking too much for the same respect, consideration, and courtesy in return. My patients love me, and many ask how long I've been at the hospital in which I work. When they learn I am a new nurse, many are surprised and tell me it seems like I've been a nurse forever. I know I am going to be alright, but it didn't have to be this difficult and stressful - some other nurses I know who have had competent orientation and work in new-nurse-friendly environments are much happier than I am in their new roles. I am not "whining," I'm just terrified of screwing up and losing the license for which I worked myself nearly to death because I work in such a negative environment. I have spoken up to several nurses recently about my concerns and some of them have been much more supportive - not all of them were aware of how I was struggling (and why) and are trying to help me more instead of being impatient when I don't know something.
    It should not be this difficult/stressful, but if it was easy--everybody would do it. You will absolutly have great days and horrible days, even seasoned.
    I did not have time to go look it up either. But they were not going to give the answer. And, like your patients, mine needed help now, so I needed answers now. I got really fast on looking things up. AND, From them telling me that, I believe that is why- on a daily bases, I read something about nurses, health care, hospitals--anything in our field. Journals/newpaperonline.
    I do more than the required CEUs, just for myself education in areas of interest.
    Once again, hang in there, it will get better.
  7. by   Ruby Vee
    [font="comic sans ms"]for those nurses on orientation who are sure they don't have time to go and look up an unfamiliar drug -- do you think that time magically stretches once you're off orientation? you are always going to encounter drugs that are unfamiliar. even after nearly three decades, i'm still running into drugs i've never heard of before. (dang pharmaceutical companies just keep crankin' 'em out!) no matter how busy, you have to take time out to look them up! how else are you going to know that benicar is an antihypertensive that mrs. youngblood should absolutely not be getting with her systolic pressure of 78? how else are you going to know that the correct dose is 20 mg, not 200 mg as the resident wrote? sometimes your peers won't have heard of the drug, either. besides -- are you going to trust your license to your co-worker's fuzzy memory of giving that drug once a year ago?

    i've always suggested that my orientees look things up on their own -- as long as there was time to do so. not, obviously, as the patient is coding. go and look stuff up now, when your preceptor suggests it. whether it be new and unfamiliar meds, procedures you haven't done since 1982 or a hospital policy you're unsure of, just go look it up! you'll get faster at looking stuff up, and you'll automatically go do it in the future rather than risk harming a patient and losing your license! besides -- you'll soon become the go-to girl for obscure questions -- and you can either regale others with your knowlege or suggest that they go look it up!
  8. by   nurseinlimbo
    This has turned into a very interesting thread. I guess from my perspective as a newer nurse (grad '03) and recent student in the OR, I just wish that nurses with more experience could put themselves back in a students shoes at times. School does not prepare us for everything that we will encounter in real life, it couldn't possibly, or a nursing program would take 10 yrs to complete. I've often thought that nursing should be approached like a trade apprenticeship: Go to school for a year, get a job as a PCA (nurse aide), put in X number of hours, if you still like it, go back to school for another year, get a job as an LPN, if you still like it, go back to school for a year, get a job as a diploma nurse, put in X amount of hours, and if you still like it, go to school for a specialty or degree. This way fewer of us would come out of school with thousands of dollars of debt only to find that we don't like it. And, it solves the nursing shortage by putting more NA's and LPNs on floors to help out. Also, you could probably pay your way through without loans, or at least substantially lower ones.

    I am just very disallusioned right now, because I've been busting my butt for the past 3 yrs, working more than full time, with rare weekends off, no OT pay and no vacation, and all I hear from colleagues is what I did wrong on the days that I took so that they could go on vacation or have a weekend off. I think sometimes nurses are so attached to their work that they can't leave it behind, and they can't stand to let someone else do it.

    I am very smart, good with my patients, understand nursing theory, but I simply can't stand the politics. If I stay in this career, I hope to be a better teacher when my time comes. Right now I am going to be helping a 2nd year student to write a paper about this exact topic, there are tonnes of journal articles about it and loads of info on the internet, so don't tell me that the problem doesn't exist, I truly think it is one of the most prevalent issues in nursing, because it perpetuates the shortage. When we get new recruits we need to appreciate their efforts and foster their growth and learning.
  9. by   1OldDinosaurRN
    i just really think it all boils down to:
    "do unto others as you would have them do unto you."

    the first thing i told my students was that there are no stupid questions. i really believe that the educational preparation needs tremendous amounts more practical hands-on teaching. theory is great, we all need to know the why's of what it is we are doing. but...graduating from nursing school in this day and age without ever having started an iv, put down an ng, anchored a f/c, or given lots and lots and lots of meds...that is ridiculously negilent of the educational system.

    maybe we should all take the popular bumper sticker's advice and "luv a nurse". take the nastiest acting nurse you know and compliment them, say something nice to them, do something nice for them, and eventually (hopefully) the goodness will take hold.

    new grads, hang in there!
  10. by   K98
    Quote from ruby vee
    [font="comic sans ms"]catchy title, eh? right up there with "why are nurses such backstabbers" (assuming that all nurses are backstabbers) and "nurses eat their young" and "why are nurses so mean?" i don't know about the rest of us "seasoned nurses", but i'm getting rather tired of all the threads busting on us for being "mean" to new nurses, students, etc. it seems to be an underlying assumption on most of the threads of the ilk that nurses are mean, evil backstabbers who live to humiliate someone with less experience.

    i've had the opportunity lately to observe some newbies and their preceptors from the patient's perspective. granted, i've been a nurse for 29 years and have been both an orientee and a preceptor -- most recently an orientee. so i do have some experience from pretty much all sides now.

    i was a patient, flat in bed after my spinal surgery. the orientee and preceptor introduced themselves, outlined the plan for the day, and then the preceptor left for a short while to sort out another patient who was screaming the screams of the totally demented, leaving the orientee to do my assessment and am care. the orientee was supposed to be almost ready to be on her own -- and she scared me to death! wanted to give my antihypertensives when my bp was 82/50, wanted to give my hctz when i was dehydrated from vomiting, npo, and my iv rate was only 50cc/hour and a few other things indicating (to me, anyway) poor judgment. when i refused to take the meds and outlined my rationale, she ordered me to take them anyway so she wouldn't get into trouble. i asked her how long she'd been in this job, and was it her first nursing job, or where had she worked before. the floodgates opened, and she started complaining about what a terrible place it was to work, the lousy pay, the horrible hours and how all the experienced staff were mean to her. (the preceptor came back into the room in time to hear that.) totally unprofessional! the preceptor didn't say anything in front of me, and calmly took her off to "plan the rest of our day."

    later that day, i overheard the orientee telling someone (i'm assuming on her cellphone) how totally mean her preceptor was, and how the preceptor was "out to get her." she said "all i was doing was bonding with my patient who is a nurse, too, and the ***** (preceptor) just totally humiliated me. she told me i was unprofessional! i thought you were supposed to be nice to your patients."

    nurse eating her young? or totally out of line and unprofessional newbie whining about being justifiably corrected?

    another time, i heard a preceptor tell her orientee not to give my antihypertensives if my bp was less than 100/systolic. (it was.) newbie comes in to give my antihypertensives anyway. (different newbie.) i refuse. newbie goes to get preceptor. preceptor and i discuss my bp and agree not to give antihypertensives. later, i hear preceptor calmly explaining to newbie that giving an antihypertensive to a hypotensive patient can cause problems. (they're out in the hall, evidently close to my room, and i didn't hear anyone else around, so i'm assuming there was at least an illusion of privacy for this discussion.) newbie got defensive and started lying. preceptor remained calm and reiterated her position. newbie continued to be defensive, escalating the volume. later, i hear the two newbies commisserating about how mean their respective preceptors are.

    i have to admit that when i hear a new nurse complaining about how "nurses eat their young", especially after those recent experiences, i always wonder what a preceptor could possibly do to try to correct some of these blatent mistakes without being accused of being "mean." and i wonder if that new nurse was as ridiculously in the wrong as those two were, and if she was, did she have any clue that her problems weren't all someone else's fault!

    precepting is a tough enough job without being accused of being evil everytime you try to help someone to do better! being a new person is difficult, too -- but please try to look at what you contribute to the problem rather than just blaming the seasoned nurses you work with!
    whiners, eh? all the whining i hear on my unit comes from the "seasoned" nurses. they are too experienced to be saddled with what they consider "distasteful" assignments, so they moan and groan until the less desirable assignments are dumped on the "whining newbies". then they sit on their big wide butts around a computer surfing for purses while the poor dumb "newbies" wear their shoes out running the halls. i had the assignment from hell for the past five 12 hour nights. i didn't complain, i just took care of my patients. i was relieved by another rookie every morning, and everything was fine. yesterday i was relieved by a "seasoned" nurse. she huffed and puffed in disbelief that someone as experienced and knowlegable as her her would be saddled with such as disgusting task. she immediately ran to the charge looking to get her assignment changed. it didn't happen, so she spent report ******** about the way i had charted, etc.. i finished report and left. it's been my experience, ruby dear, that the "newbies" have plenty to gripe about. i worked for several decades before becoming a nurse. i have never seen so much politicking, griping, and backstabbing. it's no wonder that nurses can't unite on anything.
  11. by   nurseinlimbo
    Quote from K98
    Whiners, eh? All the whining I hear on my unit comes from the "seasoned" nurses. They are too experienced to be saddled with what they consider "distasteful" assignments, so they moan and groan until the less desirable assignments are dumped on the "whining newbies". Then they sit on their big wide butts around a computer surfing for purses while the poor dumb "newbies" wear their shoes out running the halls. I had the assignment from hell for the past five 12 hour nights. I didn't complain, I just took care of my patients. I was relieved by another rookie every morning, and everything was fine. Yesterday I was relieved by a "seasoned" nurse. She huffed and puffed in disbelief that someone as experienced and knowlegable as her her would be saddled with such as disgusting task. She immediately ran to the charge looking to get her assignment changed. It didn't happen, so she spent report ******** about the way I had charted, etc.. I finished report and left. It's been my experience, Ruby Dear, that the "newbies" have plenty to gripe about. I worked for several decades before becoming a nurse. I have never seen so much politicking, griping, and backstabbing. It's no wonder that nurses can't unite on anything.

    I just about snorted my coffee! Thank you for saying what I've been too polite to put into words.
  12. by   Mulan
    Quote from 1olddinosaurrn
    i just really think it all boils down to:
    "do unto others as you would have them do unto you."

    the first thing i told my students was that there are no stupid questions. i really believe that the educational preparation needs tremendous amounts more practical hands-on teaching. theory is great, we all need to know the why's of what it is we are doing. but...graduating from nursing school in this day and age without ever having started an iv, put down an ng, anchored a f/c, or given lots and lots and lots of meds...that is ridiculously negilent of the educational system.

    maybe we should all take the popular bumper sticker's advice and "luv a nurse". take the nastiest acting nurse you know and compliment them, say something nice to them, do something nice for them, and eventually (hopefully) the goodness will take hold.

    new grads, hang in there!
    what is f/c? is that an approved abbreviation?
  13. by   twantland
    I graduated in may of 2006, but I am still considered a new grad. I am 42 and this is a second career for me. I previously ran a cleaning business for 16 years and worked as a medical assistant for 7 years. During school I did meet nurses that treated students like we were the scum of the earth, however many of them were very nice. I started working at one hospital for 6 months but due to poor staffing(usually we had 7-8 pts) on a high acuity floor(oncology,hospice, orthopedic, ect) and the night shift was absolutely terrible to follow(never gave pain meds, never hung new IV bags, never did am CS ect)I just moved to a new hospital. I have found my fellow nurses to be very friendly, although sometimes whiny. I agree with that nursing is what you make of it. No job is ever going to be absolutely wonderful. There are always going to be moments and days that are worse than others, but for the most part, nursing gives me a sense of good will, I make decent money, and I have many opportunities to travel nurse. My husband is now attending nursing school and we plan on doing just that when he is done. I unfortunately met many nursing students in school who did not have very much common sense especially when it came to nursing. I hope that new grads will realize that nursing is a job as any other job, it is not easy and if we make mistakes its patients lives who we risk. It has its rewards but with rewards comes much responsibility.

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