where are the nursing shortages? - page 16

I am hearing that there are shortages in some areas while some are cutting back jobs. Can anyone tell me for sure where thet know there are nursing shortages in the U.S or Canada. Thanks... Read More

  1. by   RN34TX
    Quote from djswan
    Ok these comments are scaring me. I'm in nursing school and was secure in the fact that I would have a job when I graduate? We live in Ohio right now but are planning on moving to Raleigh, NC. We would like to anyway.
    I think that she was referring to non-clinical/managerial type positions where nurses do not have direct patient care duties. Not the kind of job you're going to be looking for upon graduation.
    Someone from NC can correct me, but I've heard that NC has plenty of opportunities for nurses.
  2. by   fooRN
    Quote from angel337
    Chicago, IL and the surrounding suburbs. you could work every day of the week, 24/7 if you wanted to.
    [FONT=Arial Narrow]I was hoping to see someone say Chicago was hiring!! I graduate in May from WI and I am moving to the Southern Burbs of Chicago...I have 3 interviews during my spring break, hoping atleast one will hire me!!...Do you know how much the average pay for a new grad is?? I am just curious. If there is anything else you wish to inform me on, I'd greatly appreciate it!!
  3. by   JULES1
    Jenago writes; Where are the nursing shortages?

    I have just completed a paper on this subject.The shotages are from Canada to South America. Rich countries have started poaching from third world countries,
    such as Africa, where nurses are highly trained due to their close contact of working
    directly with doctors. The U.S., has been named among the poachers, with offers of
    moderate pay, and the added attraction of bringing their families with them.

    There is also a report that 60% of hospitals across the nation has 123,000 - 153,000 vacancys, with hospital CEOs labeling nursing as the most understaffed profession.
    All of this relating to the wide spread practice of lay-offs and downsizing in the 1990s.
    Severe shortages are expected over the next 15 years, as an increase in more lucrative careers, wins out over nursing;Nursing supply is unable to keep up with
    nursing demands.

    Medical facilities are offering $14,000 and up in bonuses to acquire nurses,especially
    those practicing in specialty areas.

    I hope this answers your question.

    Jules1
  4. by   jamesbrown
    my friend pointed me this internet address immigratecanada.biz for a free assessment if I qualify for canada. Great! i found out that i was qualified. At least now, i feel better knowing that i am qualified for canada.
  5. by   par72
    Quote from jenago
    I am hearing that there are shortages in some areas while some are cutting back jobs.

    Can anyone tell me for sure where thet know there are nursing shortages in the U.S or Canada.

    Thanks

    We always have vacancies here in Edmonton
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    [QUOTE=JULES1]Jenago writes; Where are the nursing shortages?

    I have just completed a paper on this subject.The shotages are from Canada to South America. Rich countries have started poaching from third world countries,
    such as Africa, where nurses are highly trained due to their close contact of working
    directly with doctors. The U.S., has been named among the poachers, with offers of
    moderate pay, and the added attraction of bringing their families with them.

    There is also a report that 60% of hospitals across the nation has 123,000 - 153,000 vacancys, with hospital CEOs labeling nursing as the most understaffed profession.
    All of this relating to the wide spread practice of lay-offs and downsizing in the 1990s.
    Severe shortages are expected over the next 15 years, as an increase in more lucrative careers, wins out over nursing;Nursing supply is unable to keep up with
    nursing demands.

    Medical facilities are offering $14,000 and up in bonuses to acquire nurses,especially
    those practicing in specialty areas.

    I hope this answers your question.

    Jules1[/

    See to me, "poaching" is a very apt word for what they call "recruiting" overseas.
  7. by   RNKitty
    Jenago writes; Where are the nursing shortages?

    "I have just completed a paper on this subject.The shotages are from Canada to South America. "

    Funny, nobody seemed to tell our administration about it. Last year in Spokane, WA, one of the major Level III hospitals layed off nurses. Last year my Level III hospital layed off all the LPN's. This month, I expect to get layed off along with 12 other nurses on my unit alone (L&D - with 9 years of experience). They are going beyond national standards, and regardless of acuity we get 2-3 labor patients or 6 antepartum patients. Basically, you get to run around doing crisis managment - the most critical patient gets the attention and the other patients get neglected until you can get in to see them. Hopefully they don't abrupt in the bathroom or deliver premies in the beds alone.
  8. by   dazzle256
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    where are you in WI?????? MY dh family are all west of Eau Claire. My son was born in Eau Claire, matter of fact.
    Sorry I've been gone for a while I live in SE part of WI... Kenosha area. Aren't you living near Bremerton? Thats where I graduated from nursing school.
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I am roughly 45 min to 1 hour from Bremerton.
  10. by   Cherish
    Quote from JVBurling
    Where can one find hard statistics to back a nursing shortage up? Where are the people saying there is a nursing shortage getting their numbers from?
    you can go to this website: http://www.discovernursing.com/jnj-s...c-graphic.aspx
  11. by   Cherish
    Quote from DelightRN
    This is an interesting thread, but I think its split over semantics. Whether there's a bona fide shortage of registered nurses in this country is really irrelevant. We're all aware that there are a number of nurses not working at the bedside, or in totally different fields, but what most of us are experiencing is a shortage of bedside nurses, and that's what is relevant in this thread, IMO.

    We definitely have a shortage here in MD. Every hospital I've ever applied to has been responsive and interested, if my qualifications are relevant. I think many people have been lulled into the idea that -- since there is a nursing shortage -- all they have to do is show up at the job interview in reasonably appropriate attire with a pulse and a valid license and they'll roll out the welcome mat. That's not entirely the case. Its important to make a "good fit" with the job you're applying for, and there are many new interviewing techniques designed to determine if you're a good fit for the facility, department, and position you're applying for.

    If you're very particular about the area you're working in, or the hours you want to work, its going to take longer to find work. I also think that although nurses start at a reasonable salary, it doesn't increase at regular intervals, and nurses often find themselves capped at a certain salary that isn't commensurate with their experience and skills set.

    I have a good friend in WI, and she has trouble finding work. She's currently at a NH, which is not where she wants to be, but necessity and child care demanded it.
    We definitely have a shortage here in MD. Every hospital I've ever applied to has been responsive and interested, if my qualifications are relevant. I think many people have been lulled into the idea that -- since there is a nursing shortage -- all they have to do is show up at the job interview in reasonably appropriate attire with a pulse and a valid license and they'll roll out the welcome mat. That's not entirely the case. Its important to make a "good fit" with the job you're applying for, and there are many new interviewing techniques designed to determine if you're a good fit for the facility, department, and position you're applying for.
    I definately agree with that. Maryland, ESPECIALLY BALTIMORE, and the D. C. area is VERY short on nurses its amazing. They even offer instate waiver at schools here for OUT OF STATE RESIDENTS thats how bad it is when it comes to nursing here!
  12. by   tiroka03
    I am from Duluth too. I agree with the small town mentaility. The jobs are scarce and the cost of living high. The worst of it is there is nothing to do up here but sit in your house for 8 months of the years.
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Sounds like a Frozen Hell to me, Walk. We have just about decided against going back to Minn/Wis after my dh retires. The weather is horrible and nursing jobs not as abundant as here in WA.

close