When are TEDs no longer EFFECTIVE

  1. While I know that Sequential TEDs are effective in dvt prophilaxis, the question I have is when do the TEDs no longer becoming useful? Is it when the pt is getting 2 times a day? 4? when the pt is ambulating 50 feet? I mean at what point do the sequentials no longer have any purpose or aren't really doing anything because the pt is moving enough? I've tried looking through the literature I have access to and I haven't found anything yet and google hasn't been helpful eather So any help or nugs in the right direction would be very helpful :-D
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    Joined: Nov '08; Posts: 10; Likes: 5


  3. by   nurseneedaname
    i am also interested but I have no idea which can help you. i will keep tracking this post. hope we can both get answers.
  4. by   jesskalpn
    I googled around a little bit and didn't find much but this particular passage did jump out at me:
    "In a number of prospective, randomized studies, SCDs have been shown to reduce the incidence of both DVT and PE. Unanswered questions regarding the use of SCDs include the mechanism by which SCDs act, the efficacy of SCDs worn on the upper extremities or a single lower extremity compared to both lower extremities, the nature of risk involved in discontinuing SCDs periodically during use, and the duration of SCD use."
    -retrieved from http://east.org/tpg/archive/html/chap52body.html

    From what I was reading, it seems that there's no way to determine an across the board guideline for the sleeves because of each unique medical hx and situation.

    Like you said, there isn't a lot of info out there on these...hope this helped a little.
    Last edit by jesskalpn on Jun 20, '09 : Reason: Footnote notations from the original passage removed because they were showing up incorrectly.
  5. by   Nurserton
    This is not an evidece based answer but just a little "nursing judgement." SCDs are used for inactive pts to simulate muscle contractions. So, my educated guess is that if the pt is inactive for long periods of time, they should have the SCDs on. To me, if a pt is lying in bed for 1-2 hours or more, that's a long enough time of inactivity to have the SCDs on. Better safe than sorry...you know docs love to shift the blame, so I'd hate for a pt to throw a clot & then it come back on you b/c they had an order for SCDs but the pt wasn't actually wearing them b/c, say, they get up to the bathroom every couple hours.
  6. by   mauxtav8r
    I think this is backwards . . . it's not that the SCD/TED's are no longer effective, but that the pt's ambulating makes them unnecessary.

    When is that happening? Like the above poster, remember that even "healthy" people can develop a clot in the length of a plane ride, so I'm thinking about frequency of ambulation, and length of time seated or bedridden.
  7. by   Tessaprn
    A recent study stated they do not have any benefits.
  8. by   ghillbert
    I think the OP was talking about SCDs?

    The actual TED stockings alone were shown in (one) recent study not to affect rates of TE.
  9. by   ayla2004
    Quote from ghillbert
    I think the OP was talking about SCDs?

    The actual TED stockings alone were shown in (one) recent study not to affect rates of TE.
    and the study was on stroke patients