What States Pay the Highest and Lowest Nursing Salaries - page 2

As with any job, salaries for nurses vary greatly from state to state and even city to city within the same state. Below are listed average high and low state salaries by degree based on the results... Read More

  1. by   BSN16
    Quote from Alismom
    Florida is definitely one of the bottom 6. I started as a GN at $21
    Ummm...GNs in iowa start at $16.
  2. by   dannibeeRN
    Quote from NickiLaughs
    California state been pretty good to me. I make about 130k a year, part time. I do 4 8s (32 hours) a week. When you add in vacation time, holiday pay, etc. It's pretty hard to beat. My benefits are good. And some people cringe at cost of living, but bringing home 7k a month allows me to very comfortably afford that 1900/mo mortgage. I'm working on paying off my student loans and cars, hopefully that will be done in the next 5 years and we can live the low stress lifestyle.
    Cali has also been good to me! My stats are the same as yours except I work 3 12s a week. I live very comfortably in the East Bay Area with my husband and kids. We close on a new house next week and my student loans are next on my "to do" list. It's unfortunate that some areas in the country don't match that area's current cost of living. We work hard at what we do and deserve to get compensated well for our efforts.
  3. by   DesertSky
    I can tell you the low pay represented for Kansas is before taxes. Shockingly enough, Kansas also has some of the highest tax rates in the country.
  4. by   DesertSky
    Quote from calivianya
    Very important question here. Not all states have income tax, but I'm not familiar enough off the top of my head to know if any of the bottom states are free of income tax. If those are before tax numbers, those could be very skewed if a nurse is trying to figure out in what states the actual compensation is the worst.
    Kansas is one of the lowest paying across numerous lists and has a relatively high rate of state income tax.
  5. by   DesertSky
    As someone who started as a new grad with a BSN in Kansas, it is true the pay is very low. After securing a job in another state before learning my husband's job was relocating him to Kansas, it was like a punch in the stomach when I compared new grad pay in Kansas to my other job offer.

    The one thing I will mention is that due to the low pay, cold winters, and general lack of people flocking to move to Kansas, there are plenty of opportunities for new grads especially in speciality areas. It may be harder to land a job as a new grad in larger cities such as Kansas City or Wichita, but if you are willing to move to more rural areas of Kansas there are an abundance of opportunities. If you work for 2 years and take advantage of your employer paying for all of your certifications (TNCC, ACLS, PALS, etc...) you will be very marketable and will have an abundance of job offers wherever you would like to move...
  6. by   Axgrinder
    I'm surprised AZ wasn't amongst the lowest paying states. In 1994 the top pay for a new grad was $12.75/hr with a BSN (is that a laugh after the debt I accumulated in college?). That wasn't even $25,000 a year full time. My BFF moved here around that time from Washington, DC - she had been earning > $20.00/hr with the same degree as a new grad. Pathetic. I just don't understand cost of living disclaimers - it pretty much cost the same in every state to fly some where, buy certain items, and pay to live. We are under paid ladies and gentlemen, no two ways about it.
  7. by   8&$$
    I live in Flagstaff, AZ as a new grad I am making $27.50 in behavioral health clinic, most of my classmates that landed in the local hospital are making $31.50 including differentials an hour and some of them are starting in the ICU and ER and making more. I think we are doing pretty good for new grad nurses. Forgot to say we only have associates
  8. by   feelix
    These results seem skewed The cost of living is low in Texas and a nurse with 5 years experience should not be making less than 65000 with an ADN working Med Surg.
  9. by   Axgrinder
    I am truly happy to hear that. I'm glad new grads are now being paid what you are worth.

    Travel back in time to Tucson, 1994 (UMC - now called BUMC) … not so fortunate.

    If this doesn't seem possible I'm sure it can easily be verified. There are plenty of us still working whom remember the bad old days of nursing pay scales.
    Last edit by Axgrinder on Jun 15, '16
  10. by   Axgrinder
    Quote from nursing education
    I live in Flagstaff, AZ as a new grad I am making $27.50 in behavioral health clinic, most of my classmates that landed in the local hospital are making $31.50 including differentials an hour and some of them are starting in the ICU and ER and making more. I think we are doing pretty good for new grad nurses. Forgot to say we only have associates
    Yes. This is pay in 2016. I was talking about new grad pay in 1994.
  11. by   Kssrn404
    Mississippi here yahoo!!'n
  12. by   Lavernh
    I have a very serious question and I would appreciate input from you guys. I am 42 years old an I just started school at my local college ( Broward College) but I as wondering if I have waited too long. I worked for a hospital for over 4 years and I got such a thrill watching the nurses do something that I've always wanted to do. Do any of you think that it is too late or do you know of someone that have gone back to school at this point in their life to become an RN ( hopefully a NP someday)? Btw, I am doing my prereqs' because a school that I attended before was shutown due to not being accredited and fraud.
  13. by   sweetumsRN
    I'm kind of amazed that Nebraska isn't on the list. I'm in an urban area (yes, we *do* have those) and a local system just increased their pay rates: $23.81/hr for ADN/diploma, $25/hr for BSN, and $26.25/hr for MSN. There is a differential for the 1500-2300 shift (I think it's 10%) and for overnights and weekends (15%?). But keep in mind, that this area just saw a significant pay increase for nurses due to a battle with a particular insurance company. The battle caused facilities to lose business, nurses began to jump ship. Competing facilities increased base wages to lure nurses away, which caused an increase in base wages all over the metro area. I myself received an extra $3/hr due to the SNAFU.

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