What makes you nervous about or irritated with a new grad or orientee? - page 3

I've noticed alot of threads lately from new nurses who seemed quite stressed out, which I can totally understand, I've been there for sure. So I thought I'd start a thread from the other POV. This... Read More

  1. by   bellcollector
    I am in the weird position of being a new old nurse. I have experience in geriatric LTC. However 2yrs ago I was injured and after surgery and long intense PT I am finally back to work. So now I feel like a new nurse all over again. I feel very insecure and unsure of myself. I have no problem with the patients and their needs. That all came back just like riding a bike. The problem is the LTC that I am working in is a small but very unorganized facility. I can't make heads or tails of where everything is and exactly what is expected of me. I work 3rd so Iknow a lot of the cleaning and organizing falls to me and I am very good at it. The problem is everything is a mess for example we are suppose to count and send back meds of patients that have been discharged or expired. It hasn't been done in ages there are two huge piles and in the two nights I have worked I haven't even touched it. I am not even getting done with my med pass on time. I am doing the med pass correctly and am confident that each and every patient was properly medicated and greeted for the morning. All my assessments were completed, treatments done, small crisis everted and such. However I don't know what happened these last two yrs to my speed and confidence. I am fearful that I may be getting on my coworkers nerves. They have been kind and encouraging but I can't help but feel bad. On top of that like an idiot I let my MD take me off of my HRT a month ago and I am a great big ball of tears. I try to hide it but they obviously see it. Also having probs with administration. I am very intimidated by the admin. and now I have a mark on my record. The DON told me one thing concerning my schedule but then put something on the schedule without telling me and noone ever gave me a copy of it. I checked and rechecked with her and wrote down exactly what she told me and that is what I did. So I ended up being a no call no show last night and didn't even know it until 2hrs into my shift when they called me. I was not terminated but was told that it would remain on my record as a no call no show and that regardless of what I was told it was my responsibility to find a schedule and make sure there were no changes. I feel like I am failing badly and am also worried that on top of it I am annoying to my coworkers. See even this post sounds annoying. So what do you all think?
  2. by   all4schwa
    Quote from SethJ
    I had something happen in clinicals and I wasn't sure how to handle it. The Nurse had a great deal of experience, but she interfered with my IM injection. First she yelled at me for using the scoop and sweep technique after I drew up the medication. She claimed the needle wouldn't be sterile? Then she told me to draw back an extra CC of air to "keep the medication in". Finally she tried to move my hand and make me aspirate with the other (we were taught to use the thumb). I didn't argue with her. After all, she was signing her name to the chart. I'm just a student.

    But, when I talked to my instructor, she told me to ignore the nurse's "suggestions" and go with the techniques we learned. After all, we were being taught the most up to date ways to perform procedures and the procedures are evidence based.

    I'm just wondering how to handle this in future clinicals. What do ya'll think about that? Any ideas?
    sweep and scoop would be sterile unless you missed and swiped the needle against the counter or something, in which case i think you would know to get a new needle. duh.
    the one cc of air is outdated, but not harmful...and it should not matter with what hand or digit you pull back the plunger, aspiration is aspiration. i've had someone try to step in and move my hands, it's like having someone grab the wheel while you are driving. but, that aside i see a lot of nursing doing things or telling me how to do things that i don't think are the best way. but i nod and go on, and sometimes incorporate pieces and parts of what i pick up into my always evolving practice.

    as far as my peeves, it really is about one extreme or the other...i cant stand someone to appologize over and over...ugh.
  3. by   CHATSDALE
    domen nures arrive at work bringing with the knowledge they have gathered
    they leave a school settting in which the younger classmates found them to be knowledgeable, WENT STRAIGHT TO HEAD, now they come to floor to the lucky people who will have the benefit of their knowledge

    not all their fault, their instructors have frequently told them that some of the nurses are using methods that are 5-10 years old and you must do the up to date methods talking and comprimise will will help this but pity the preceptor who gets an know it all with a big smile
  4. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    At the very start she pulled me aside and told me - "I don't mind if you ask the same question a thousand times - that's what I'm here for. I'd rather you ask me a question - no matter how dumb/silly you think it is - rather than NOT ask and make a mistake which costs the both of us."
    Man ... I wished my preceptor was like that. Instead, I was ridiculed for asking questions. I'd always get comments like: didn't they teach you anything in nursing school?

    I always do things the way the RN's want it to be done and don't argue. I figure I'll have plenty of time to do things my way when I'm on my own. But ... some of them just want to put you down no matter what.

    One time it was an hour before the shift change and I was pretty tired. She had the MAR and I needed to give some morphine. I'd been giving the same dose all day but, I wanted to make sure I was remembering it correctly since I was tired.

    Since she had the book ... I casually asked ... this is the dose ... right? Man ... she jumped on me: don't you remember the dose? I said: yeah ... but I'm kinda tired and just want to make sure.

    Her response was: You need to develop more stamina!

    Ok ... I was just trying to be safe but ... whatever.

  5. by   GardenDove
    I think seasoned nurses need to totally respect new nurses who want to double and triple check. They are like new drivers, things don't come automatically except with time behind the wheel. I don't like it if I hear a collegue critisizing a new nurse for being extra vigilant.
  6. by   Tweety
    Quote from lizz
    Man ... I wished my preceptor was like that. Instead, I was ridiculed for asking questions. I'd always get comments like: didn't they teach you anything in nursing school?

    I always do things the way the RN's want it to be done and don't argue. I figure I'll have plenty of time to do things my way when I'm on my own. But ... some of them just want to put you down no matter what.

    One time it was an hour before the shift change and I was pretty tired. She had the MAR and I needed to give some morphine. I'd been giving the same dose all day but, I wanted to make sure I was remembering it correctly since I was tired.

    Since she had the book ... I casually asked ... this is the dose ... right? Man ... she jumped on me: don't you remember the dose? I said: yeah ... but I'm kinda tired and just want to make sure.

    Her response was: You need to develop more stamina!

    Ok ... I was just trying to be safe but ... whatever.

    Lizz sometimes I'm amazed you've made it so far.......your entire experience from day one has sounded dreadful. You should have said "yes, I do, but despite that I'm performing the five rights......isn't that what you do?".

    From day one when I precept I beg them to please ask me questions, no matter how silly, that it's never a bother, that I'm never too busy, that I am there for them, that this is their experience, not mine. it's not about me and if I get irritated, it's up to me to deal with it without degrading the GN or senior student.

    I've learned to deal with all kinds of personalities, the "know it alls", the fearful ones who are slow and ask too many questions, etc. but mostly people who have worked their tails off to become a nurse and just want to be the best that they can be. They do have some responsiblities, however, it is my job to adjust myself, my attitude and my teaching style to them and make sure that at the end of 12 weeks they are ready to hit the floor on their own safely.
  7. by   Sheri257
    Well ... I don't want to turn this into another nightmare preceptor thread ...

    But I really do salute the RN's who appreciate the fact that some of us new grads are trying to do the right thing.

    And thank you for encouraging us to ask questions because, there are some RN's who discourage us ... a lot.

    :typing
  8. by   all4schwa
    Quote from Tweety
    that this is their experience, not mine. it's not about me and if I get irritated, it's up to me to deal with it without degrading the GN or senior student.
    which makes me wonder why preceptors act like this. hello, do you wanna work on the floor with a crummy nurse or one that a least knows everything you know and have shared? i need to know that the other nurses working are able to help me in a pickle.
  9. by   GardenDove
    I think some nurses aren't cut out to be preceptors. Only those skilled at it should do it. Tweety, you sound wonderful.

    I wouldn't do well as a preceptor because I have the opposite problem, I'm too easy going with people and would hesitate to do anything to embarrass them. I think a good preceptor shouldn't be afraid to be straight forward with a new nurse, yet tactful and respectful. Cranky, impatient nurses shouldn't precept!
  10. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from GardenDove
    I think some nurses aren't cut out to be preceptors. Only those skilled at it should do it. Tweety, you sound wonderful.

    I wouldn't do well as a preceptor because I have the opposite problem, I'm too easy going with people and would hesitate to do anything to embarrass them. I think a good preceptor shouldn't be afraid to be straight forward with a new nurse, yet tactful and respectful. Cranky, impatient nurses shouldn't precept!
    No need to embarrass them. If it's something that isn't dangerous to the patient but just a procedure error, I'll just say, "Can I show you something?" and then proceed to demonstrate the correct way, explaining what I'm doing and why, and also why I'm not doing things a certain way.

    Just remember, everyone is new at something. They deserve to be taught in a way that makes them look forward to learning more.
  11. by   RN007
    Quote from Tweety

    From day one when I precept I beg them to please ask me questions, no matter how silly, that it's never a bother, that I'm never too busy, that I am there for them, that this is their experience, not mine. it's not about me and if I get irritated, it's up to me to deal with it without degrading the GN or senior student.
    Boy, Tweety. I wish I could have you or any of the other nurses in this thread who like students to ask questions. I am a question-asker. I want to know everything. Not only because I'm curious, but because I think I should know what's going on. I frequently get comments like, "My, you're certainly inquisitive" or "You sure do ask a lot of questions", and during one of my clinical rotations even got written up about it because the instructor thought I was challenging her. I posted about it here because I was crushed. In the write up, the nurse said I could ask a question once and after that I would be disciplined. Can you believe it? Needless to say, I appealed and the course instructor stuck with me, God bless her. I graduate in May and will carefully select my nurse manager because I will always ask questions. The day I stop will be the day I quit being a nurse!
  12. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from RN007
    Boy, Tweety. I wish I could have you or any of the other nurses in this thread who like students to ask questions. I am a question-asker. I want to know everything. Not only because I'm curious, but because I think I should know what's going on. I frequently get comments like, "My, you're certainly inquisitive" or "You sure do ask a lot of questions", and during one of my clinical rotations even got written up about it because the instructor thought I was challenging her. I posted about it here because I was crushed. In the write up, the nurse said I could ask a question once and after that I would be disciplined. Can you believe it? Needless to say, I appealed and the course instructor stuck with me, God bless her. I graduate in May and will carefully select my nurse manager because I will always ask questions. The day I stop will be the day I quit being a nurse!
    I'm shocked that you got written up for wanting to learn. I love to precept students like you--if I don't know, I'll find out and we both learn something new.

    Part of my job is to teach you how to be an independent nurse by teaching you where to find the information that you need.

    Information is not static; it's dynamic. It's always changing and you have to ask lots of questions to keep up.

    Given the proper nurturing, you'll make an excellent nurse.
  13. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from bellcollector
    I am in the weird position of being a new old nurse. I have experience in geriatric LTC. However 2yrs ago I was injured and after surgery and long intense PT I am finally back to work. So now I feel like a new nurse all over again. I feel very insecure and unsure of myself. I have no problem with the patients and their needs. That all came back just like riding a bike. The problem is the LTC that I am working in is a small but very unorganized facility. I can't make heads or tails of where everything is and exactly what is expected of me. I work 3rd so Iknow a lot of the cleaning and organizing falls to me and I am very good at it. The problem is everything is a mess for example we are suppose to count and send back meds of patients that have been discharged or expired. It hasn't been done in ages there are two huge piles and in the two nights I have worked I haven't even touched it. I am not even getting done with my med pass on time. I am doing the med pass correctly and am confident that each and every patient was properly medicated and greeted for the morning. All my assessments were completed, treatments done, small crisis everted and such. However I don't know what happened these last two yrs to my speed and confidence. I am fearful that I may be getting on my coworkers nerves. They have been kind and encouraging but I can't help but feel bad. On top of that like an idiot I let my MD take me off of my HRT a month ago and I am a great big ball of tears. I try to hide it but they obviously see it. Also having probs with administration. I am very intimidated by the admin. and now I have a mark on my record. The DON told me one thing concerning my schedule but then put something on the schedule without telling me and noone ever gave me a copy of it. I checked and rechecked with her and wrote down exactly what she told me and that is what I did. So I ended up being a no call no show last night and didn't even know it until 2hrs into my shift when they called me. I was not terminated but was told that it would remain on my record as a no call no show and that regardless of what I was told it was my responsibility to find a schedule and make sure there were no changes. I feel like I am failing badly and am also worried that on top of it I am annoying to my coworkers. See even this post sounds annoying. So what do you all think?
    Bellcollector, this sounds like a post that belongs in the LTC section of this forum.This is very typical of LTCs .Not at all unusual, but definatly wrong.

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