What is your biggest nursing pet peeve?? - page 5

Nurses that are brilliant but do not know the difference between contraindication and contradiction!!!!!!!:rotfl: :rotfl:... Read More

  1. by   LolaRN
    Quote from bunrab
    nurses who say aw-toe-log-us instead of autologous. emphasis on "log" instead of "tol".
    nurses who say orientated instead of oriented.
    people who don't know the difference btwn good and well, as in i did good on that test instead of i did well on that test.
    i know they are silly, but butchering the english language drives me nuts.
    I couldn't agree more. Also spelling errors which are consistent drive me crazy. We all make mistakes but it's hard to have faith in your nurse when they can't even spell. Also, nurses who say "o2 stat" instead of "o2 sat."
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    If you say "o2 stat" on our floor, someone wants to freak, grab a cannula, and the o2 can.
  3. by   Tweety
    The nurses that feel the need to inform me when they are menstrating. Had a tech today "don't mess with me today, I've got PMS".....ummm....thank you very much, I'll walk on eggshells, allow you do be lazy and short-tempered, appreciate the info.
  4. by   Grant Morgan
    Patients that tell me :
    "i'VE GOT MEDICAL AID, AND I WANT YOU TO DO........cos I'M PAYING YOUR SALARY!!!!!"

    My reply:
    "Even if you went to another hospital, I'd still get paid at the end of the month!"
  5. by   Rocknurse
    Quote from VioletX
    tehehhehe! This drives me insane too ... especially the orientated part. What's up with that?? Another thing that doesn't really qualify as a pet peeve but it does make me laugh is when in report nurses say things like "he didn't vomit on me today" ... meaning on their shift ... I always want to say "I should hope not".
    Orientated is actually correct English...the type we invented in England! Oriented is an Americanism that drives me nuts!

    orientated

    Orientate \O"ri*en*tate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Orientated; p. pr. & vb. n. Orientating.] [From Orient.] 1. To place or turn toward the east; to cause to assume an easterly direction, or to veer eastward.

    2. To arrange in order; to dispose or place (a body) so as to show its relation to other bodies, or the relation of its parts among themselves.
  6. by   Darchild77
    We have a nurse who couldn't answer the phone because she had "already clocked out". This same nurse, on a different occasion, watched late decels in a laboring patient for 2 hours without a single intervention-such as a scalp electrode to get a more accurate reading. Of course, when I arrived, she told me I should put a scalp e on. She knew this patient would be a C-sec and just wanted to pass the buck.
  7. by   TaraER-RN
    I hate the "When will I be seen?", or "why did you take that patient before my daughter"...daughter in for nausea/vomiting, guy I took clutching at chest, diaphoretic, can hardly speak. Lazy nurses who get mad when nobody is helping them, but have the time to check their e-mail on the internet. People who won't clean up their code browns or yellows and the patient obviously stinks and is festering in their own stuff. Oh and I loved the day that I was talking to a fellow nurse, and the family member of a patient asked me if I could go talk somewhere else becuase their girlfriend was trying to sleep. Or the ones who are "so sick, I need to be seen right away" and then gripe when you're doing IV's, labs etc trying to figure out whats wrong with them. I hate the ones with tatoo/piercings that are scared to death of IV's and lab draws....I have both and have had IV's...tatoos are DEFINITELY worse, I'd take an IV again any day. hmm...what else...The ones who gripe and gripe about when are their results going to be back because they want to go home and then once the results are back and you're getting ready to discharge them their are all the sudden in too much pain and how dare we try to discharge them..grrr (that happened tonight).And I really hate those that before you even have them in a room are telling you what kind of pain medicine to give them..because nothiing else works, and that you need to start an IV in this spot and it has to be a butterfly! Had one, one day that sweared up and down that Toradol wouldn't work for her pain and that I needed a butterfly/baby needle to poke her...well I put an 18g in her and gave her Ketorulac ?sp (the other name for Toradol)...and low and behold it worked! wow...I could go on and on...I love the ER its just crazy sometimes!
  8. by   teeituptom
    Quote from TaraER-RN
    I hate the "When will I be seen?", or "why did you take that patient before my daughter"...daughter in for nausea/vomiting, guy I took clutching at chest, diaphoretic, can hardly speak. Lazy nurses who get mad when nobody is helping them, but have the time to check their e-mail on the internet. People who won't clean up their code browns or yellows and the patient obviously stinks and is festering in their own stuff. Oh and I loved the day that I was talking to a fellow nurse, and the family member of a patient asked me if I could go talk somewhere else becuase their girlfriend was trying to sleep. Or the ones who are "so sick, I need to be seen right away" and then gripe when you're doing IV's, labs etc trying to figure out whats wrong with them. I hate the ones with tatoo/piercings that are scared to death of IV's and lab draws....I have both and have had IV's...tatoos are DEFINITELY worse, I'd take an IV again any day. hmm...what else...The ones who gripe and gripe about when are their results going to be back because they want to go home and then once the results are back and you're getting ready to discharge them their are all the sudden in too much pain and how dare we try to discharge them..grrr (that happened tonight).And I really hate those that before you even have them in a room are telling you what kind of pain medicine to give them..because nothiing else works, and that you need to start an IV in this spot and it has to be a butterfly! Had one, one day that sweared up and down that Toradol wouldn't work for her pain and that I needed a butterfly/baby needle to poke her...well I put an 18g in her and gave her Ketorulac ?sp (the other name for Toradol)...and low and behold it worked! wow...I could go on and on...I love the ER its just crazy sometimes!
    Welcome to the wonderfull world of the ER
    Aint life grand
    remember golf helps
    take frustrations out by beating an innocent little ball to death. works well.
  9. by   oldiebutgoodie
    I am a nursing student, and my big pet peeve so far is floor nurses who decide to share valuable information, but they are dead wrong. It's fine to make a mistake, but don't pronounce it with great confidence in front of a student! One of my fellow students was chewed out by a fairly new nurse for not wearing gloves THE ENTIRE TIME she was in the room(there was no contact precautions.) I have been told information about patients that was dead wrong (because I had to scour the chart before coming in) but told with great authority. One nurse corrected my pronunciation of a procedure, and mispronounced it all over the place.

    Please, if you are going to teach us, at least have the information correct!

    And here is a big thank you to the nurses who take time to help students, who share correct information, who don't roll their eyes when the student comes to you for help, and are great teachers. Thanks! You know who you are!

    Oldiebutgoodie
  10. by   MamaSN
    Quote from NS_RN
    Full code patients who are terminally ill , have end stage disease or are over the age of 80!
    Could you please explain what you mean by full code pt over 80? Not trying to flame, just trying to understand.

    My Dad was a full code while in hosptial for cancer treatment. He wanted everything done for him possible, he just felt he wasn't ready yet. Won't get into all the details, but he did code, things turned around and he lived cancer free for almost 10 years, which were really good years. What's wrong with wanting to live longer when your 80? Most of my relatives on both sides live well into their 90's. I'm hoping to be one of them!

    Mama

    forgot to mention he was 79 at the time of admission
    Last edit by MamaSN on Mar 24, '04
  11. by   ManEnough
    I think NS_RN meant full code for patients whom have no chance at any quality of life. I too find this infuriating.

    Sounds like your dad wouldn't have fit into this category.
  12. by   NursesRmofun
    Quote from rn500
    oh - one more... i work in ob, and i just love it when a pt asks for pain med, and when i am about to give it they ask "will this hurt the baby?"
    ???????????????????
    yes, it's going to kill your baby, that's why we give it to you!!!
    or maybe i should say...
    what??!! your're pregnant?? for god's sake why didn't you tell me????? i can't give this to you, it's poison!!!

    i know, i know... they are right to worry and they are just being protective, but it still make me laugh (inside of course!)
    [font=franklin gothic medium]i know what you mean! :chuckle
  13. by   NursesRmofun
    Ruby Vee wrote:
    4) Families who want to know how "Uncle Jimmy" is doing, become incensed when I quote HIPAA laws to them, and then claim they don't know how to get in touch with the patient's family to as them how he's doing. (Excuse me, but if you don't know how to get in touch with "Uncle Jimmy's" family, perhaps you don't know him well enough to be visiting him in ICU.)


    Good one! I also get *internally* crazy with families who have several members who do not speak to each other -OR- they want to make sure you aren't talking out of two sides of your mouth, so you have to rehash the answers to questions with each family member that comes in (Of course, this is when the patient okays it...HIPPA, HIPPA, HIPPA!) When I can and it is appropriate, I refer them to the doc...which is a lot!
    Last edit by NursesRmofun on Mar 24, '04 : Reason: forgot to add credit for quote

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