What Is the Problem With These Nurses? - page 9

I've always thought the "nurses eating their young" phenomenon was somewhat of a misnomer, since we're not their children and I know students can impose a lot of burdens on nurses. But, when you're... Read More

  1. by   Sheri257
    Quote from RN-Cardiac
    :smackingf
    Hang in there Lizz,..it will get better!!!
    Oh, it's done now ... thank god. I was just responding to posts on the thread.

    :typing
  2. by   feefeego
    Hi !!! I'm new to this site
    So I have had similar experiences as previously posted. I graduated one year ago with my RN and then worked in L&D at a high acuity facility for one year, now i've transfered to a lower acuity facility and have just completed orientation. I feel like i've made a huge mistake and I now realize how much better it was at my first hospital. For instance, one of the six nurses that oriented me in one month told me that I was stepping on peoples toes! and pissing a lot of people off, Now I realize that I do not know everything since I am new to nursing, but a year at the high acuity facility is equal to two years anywhere else, because of the volume and high risk patients we cared for. So needless to say I know whate I'm doing. I was made to feel so stupid and incompetent!!! I am so sick of this mentality of nurses eating there young and making new RNs to feel that they have no idea what they are doing. Plus the fact that this new unit is soooo incredibly short staffed its scary and unsafe so they should be treating me like gold if they don't want to loose me. My husband tells me that I need to stick it out, and just go to work and do my job and not complain so once I am there longer then I will have more senority and not be treated so poorly. The sad thing is that I know I am a good nurse because my patients can tell I'm sincerely caring for them, also all the doctors I have worked with will always say to there patients in front of me what good hands they are in. I am confident in patient care but for my new fellow nurses I am loosing faith. This is a sad epidemic in this profession and no wonder we are short on nurses, who wants to be treated like crap?!

    Thanks for reading :spin:
  3. by   Sheri257
    Quote from feefeego
    My husband tells me that I need to stick it out, and just go to work and do my job and not complain so once I am there longer then I will have more senority and not be treated so poorly.

    This is a sad epidemic in this profession and no wonder we are short on nurses, who wants to be treated like crap?!
    Yeah, I kept telling myself the same thing also but, for me at least, it was easier said than done. I hadn't been in a toxic environment like this before (except when I worked as an aide at another hospital). I just kept saying, tough it out ... and I did but ...

    It is so difficult to concentrate on your work when you're constantly attacked and treated like crap. It's a lot harder than I thought it would be. I did adjust and improve but ... I know I would have done a lot better elsewhere.

    I guess I have to not only learn how to be a new nurse but, also, how to deal with hostile environments that exist for no particular reason at all.

    If I'm going to be treated like crap, I want to be paid A LOT of money, at least.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 8, '06
  4. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from lizz
    But that's just it: she wasn't doing most of the job, I was. In order to pass preceptorship, I had to do 80 percent of the work for all five patients and, believe me ... I was.

    Normally, I would agree if I was a first semester student. But, I was a pretty functional fourth semester student. I was running all day and that's fine but ... don't tell me this was tough duty for my preceptor.

    When I was there my preceptor was reading magazines, watching soap operas in the nurses' lounge and chatting shopping with her friends all day. Why? Because I was, in fact, doing most of the work. She didn't have to watch me or do much of anything.

    Having to stop reading a magazine to give me occassional instruction wasn't that much of a hardship in this particular case.

    The only time she really got busy was when we were slammed with a bunch of admits and discharges but, that didn't happen very often.

    :typing
    Sigh...you don't know what you don't know.
  5. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from feefeego
    Hi !!! I'm new to this site
    So I have had similar experiences as previously posted. I graduated one year ago with my RN and then worked in L&D at a high acuity facility for one year, now i've transfered to a lower acuity facility and have just completed orientation. I feel like i've made a huge mistake and I now realize how much better it was at my first hospital. For instance, one of the six nurses that oriented me in one month told me that I was stepping on peoples toes! and pissing a lot of people off, Now I realize that I do not know everything since I am new to nursing, but a year at the high acuity facility is equal to two years anywhere else, because of the volume and high risk patients we cared for. So needless to say I know whate I'm doing. I was made to feel so stupid and incompetent!!! I am so sick of this mentality of nurses eating there young and making new RNs to feel that they have no idea what they are doing. Plus the fact that this new unit is soooo incredibly short staffed its scary and unsafe so they should be treating me like gold if they don't want to loose me. My husband tells me that I need to stick it out, and just go to work and do my job and not complain so once I am there longer then I will have more senority and not be treated so poorly. The sad thing is that I know I am a good nurse because my patients can tell I'm sincerely caring for them, also all the doctors I have worked with will always say to there patients in front of me what good hands they are in. I am confident in patient care but for my new fellow nurses I am loosing faith. This is a sad epidemic in this profession and no wonder we are short on nurses, who wants to be treated like crap?!

    Thanks for reading :spin:
    Have you considered that maybe your interactions with your colleagues may be part of the problem? Are you often telling them how "At the other hospital, we used to do it this way..."? Do you say things that may suggest that your current unit is inferior to the other one? What caught my attention was your assertion right off that bat that one year at the previous hospital equaled two years anywhere else, as well as the "they should be treating me like gold" remark. To be honest, that comment flat out scared me. It sounded like ego run amok. Shouldn't they be treating all their nurses like gold (particularly the ones with years of experience)?

    If it is truly so dreadful where you are, perhaps you should go back to your previous unit, where it was so much better. It's obvious you have nothing to learn at the new facility; your talents are being wasted.
  6. by   abbythetabby
    Quote from VickyRN
    Whether management realizes it or not, the experience of nursing students during clinicals at their hospital is the most powerful recruitment tool there is - FOR or AGAINST. If the nurses on a floor are welcoming and helpful to the students, then the graduate nurses will choose that place for their first job, even if the pay is less than somewhere else, or they have to drive 30 miles. If the unit has a "toxic" feel, then graduates will avoid that place like the plague, even if the management is offering all sorts of pay incentives and bonuses, and the place is "local."
    Exactly!
    I've had clinical experience in four hospitals so far, and when I graduate, there's one I would never consider joining. I don't care if they pay more than anyone else, have great benefits and are within walking distance. Nothing is worth being as miserable as those nurses are.
  7. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from lizz
    Oh, it's done now ... thank god. I was just responding to posts on the thread.

    :typing
    Did you pass? What are you doing now? I hope things are better for you and I hope you have a great holiday.
  8. by   Sheri257
    Quote from TrudyRN
    Did you pass? What are you doing now? I hope things are better for you and I hope you have a great holiday.
    Thank you very much. I did pass. Luckily, I have a good relationship with my teacher going back to first semester and, she knows this nurse from working with her at another hospital.

    I knew that my teacher couldn't reassign me because they were so short on preceptors so, I didn't say anything because I didn't want to bother her.

    But, near the end, my preceptor claimed that the teacher was saying bad stuff about me which, was really weird because I had just met with the teacher earlier that day.

    This teacher is the kind of person who would tell me in no uncertain terms if she thought I wasn't performing or, anything else for that matter.

    So, at that point, I did call my teacher and, she knew what was going on. Of course, my teacher never said any of the things my preceptor claimed she did.

    My teacher said she's been doing this for 30 years and, no matter what my preceptor said, she knows I'm a safe practitioner. She said she knew there were problems with that nurse and on that floor so ... she told me not to worry about it.

    That was it. I'm graduating next week.

    Again, thanks for the kind thoughts.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 10, '06
  9. by   rnin02
    I think its been said once or twice in this thread, but if your are being a good preceptor, it is alot of work. Alot of hard work, even if the orientee doesn't always see it. Its the preceptor's responsibility to make sure everything was done correctly, and the patient is stable, so alot of double work gets done. It sounds like things are far different in CA vs VA as far as clinicals go, we didn't have to take so many patients during clinicals, or do 80% of the work for them either.

    Also, on my old unit, preceptors for the students weren't always assigned in advance, although somewhere. For the externs, they were almost always assigned in advance, but for the students just there a few weeks for clinicals (6 weeks, twice a week I think?) they get assigned to a patient or two, not a specific nurse.
  10. by   rach_nc_03
    Quote from kadokin
    Unfortunately, in this profession, we sometimes have to: bend over backwords; feed egos; take an inordinate amount of crap; be treated like dirt; maintain professional demeanor in the face of unbelievable circumstances.

    yeah....but we *shouldn't* have to put up with any of the above. We continue to get treated this way because we allow it to happen.
  11. by   tiggertoo
    :yeahthat:
    I had one preceptor that swore that it was a universal concept to give coumadin at 1700 and that of course everyone knows that. She even looked it up in the Drug Reference. She didn't find it.
  12. by   ern91
    Find a different environment in which to work. Not all depts., hospitals,etc.
    will have this problem. It depends upon the management and what they promote/tolerate. I have worked where the behavior you describe was rampant and also where it was not. I have found, in my 16 years of experience as a nurse, that finding the right job is kind of like finding the right life partner. You kiss a few frogs before you find your prince/princess.
  13. by   hecete
    Where I Work, In Snf, The Situation Is Probably The Same. The Grads They Are Turning Out Now Leave Alot To Be Desired. To Work In This Snf You Have To Multi-task Your Whole Shift. These New Grads Can Barely Pass Meds, Forget About Doing A Pt. Assesment. Don't Know How Many Times I've Found Trachs Plugged, G-tubes Draining On The Bed Etc. You Can Talk Til You're Blue In The Face, They Just Don't Get It!!!!

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