What Is the Problem With These Nurses? - page 5

I've always thought the "nurses eating their young" phenomenon was somewhat of a misnomer, since we're not their children and I know students can impose a lot of burdens on nurses. But, when you're... Read More

  1. by   Sheri257
    Quote from ingelein
    Whoa, you are scaring me .Maybe we should not allow entrance into the nursing field unless you are a male, or post menopausal.
    PMS is now a widely accepted phenomenon. Menopause isn't much fun either. It's just the way it is.

    Look at all of the threads on this board and everything that's going on. It's always the same story ... nurses backstabbing each other for no reason in particular. You don't think hormones have something to do with it?

    :typing
  2. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from lizz
    PMS is now a widely accepted phenomenon. Menopause isn't much fun either. It's just the way it is.

    Look at all of the threads on this board and everything that's going on. It's always the same story ... nurses backstabbing each other for no reason in particular. You don't think hormones have something to do with it?

    :typing
    I do agree that a PMS-ing woman is more on edge. I think it may have a wee bit to do with it, but if we go that route we are once again negating the REAL issues of mobbing. My opinion only, but it is so prevalent because this frustration we feel every day at work compounded by the feeling of impotence to change anything makes us lash out at each other because its the only thing that we can easily do. I am only an LPN, I have no degree in phsychology, only a dilpoma in the school of hard knocks. :smiley_ab I speak only from 27 years of observing this phenomenon.
    Last edit by Simplepleasures on Nov 30, '06
  3. by   jenni82104
    I'd say it's a pretty good observation.
  4. by   Sheri257
    Quote from ingelein
    I do agree that a PMS-ing woman is more on edge. I think it may have a wee bit to do with it, but if we go that route we are once again negating the REAL issues of mobbing. My opinion only, but it is so prevalent because this frustration we feel every day at work compounded by the feeling of impotence to change anything makes us lash out at each other because its the only thing that we can easily do. I am only an LPN, I have no degree in phychology, only a dilpma in the shool of hard knocks. :smiley_ab I speak only from 27 years of observing this phenomenon.
    I certainly can buy that to a certain extent. But ... I don't see it as the reason my preceptor is lashing out at me. For one thing, we're in California where there's ratios. Also ... it's a union hospital so ... they have a lot of job protection and procedures to address grievances like floating, etc.

    She's been there six years so, obviously, she's happy there. If she wasn't happy there's a million other jobs she could take if she wanted to. She told me she'll make $100K this year with overtime, which is pretty typical of most nurses I know so ...

    I still think it all goes back to hormones.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Nov 30, '06
  5. by   smk1
    Quote from lizz
    I guess that's my complaint here. I can understand that when you're dealing with first semester students, just as an example ... it is a real hassle because the students don't know anything and the RN has to be with them all the time.

    But by the time we get to preceptorship, the RN doesn't have to be with us at all. We've been signed off on everything and, before we go to preceptorship, we have to get signed off on several tasks again ... just to make sure we can do it.

    There's very little we can't do as far as routine med surg floor tasks. The RN does not have to be with us unless it's something we literally have no experience with, which doesn't happen all that often with routine med surg tasks.

    So, it's really not that much of a hassle for us to be there except ... teaching us the quirks of that particular facility's system and equipment. My RN has never gone into any room to watch me do anything. You are, at that point doing most of the work because that's what you have to do to pass.

    But sometimes, I guess, it's just more fun to be mean than nice ... even when people are helping you out.

    :typing
    This is true. We are 2nd term students and can do a lot on a med surg floor, but not everything and we have to have supervision from an RN when actually giving the meds to the patient, hanging IV's, wet to dry dressing changes, putting in a foley, inserting NG tubes, trach suctioning etc.. (basically putting in anything sterile, or inserting anything into a body orifice). We can take out IV caths, urinary caths, empty drains, do simple dressings, CBG's, assessments, charting and any basic skill on our own. We don't make the rules, but we sure can get kicked out of the program for not following them. Some nurses get very irritated that they have to actually watch us hand the meds to the patient or hang the bag. I understand that they are busy, but to get to where they are now, once upon a time they were in a similar position. Acting super annoyed with the student isn't going to do anything except make the student think "boy I sure won't be applying here". On the other hand I have seen some students who are not proactive. The student should be getting all the supplies (if they know what to get) and getting everything ready and communicating with the nurse about what times are good for them to come watch you do _____. This will cut down on the time we are taking up from the nurses. A good orientation that includes the staff would help in our case.
  6. by   GardenDove
    Hey, along with the more negative traits of the female gender, are some pretty great ones, don't forget! Women are great nurturers, which is why we are such great nurses. (And, according to Gallup, the most respected profession!)
  7. by   Sheri257
    And, btw, the reason I think it's hormones is ... I'm having some pretty bad menstrual cramps right now and I wouldn't mind beating on a student myself. Or, better yet ... my preceptor.

    But, I'll just have to settle for my husband. :Crash:

    Just kidding, of course.

    :Crash:
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Nov 30, '06
  8. by   morte
    hmm lizz, my thought would be to get her expectations and instructions in WRITING.. signed.....so she cant wiggle out of them later....merely asking her to do this should set her back on her heels a bit....other than that, you are learning a WHOLE lot about how NOT to be.......good luck
  9. by   Simplepleasures
    I guess some people are just plain mean and hatefull no matter what, but it seems that nursing is the last place we need to have these sort of meanies.:icon_sad:
  10. by   loricatus
    Quote from lizz
    i've always thought the "nurses eating their young" phenomenon was somewhat of a misnomer, since we're not their children and i know students can impose a lot of burdens on nurses. but, when you're pretty functional and helping out with most of the work, and some nurses still beat you down to a pulp, i just don't get it.

    what's the point of being so mean? i'm running my butt off all day, i'm giving all of the meds, doing all of the charting, aide work, etc. for most of the patients. yet, no matter how hard i work, there's still a constant barrage of criticism ...

    of course, i make mistakes and i definitely need to improve in a lot of areas. no question about it. nevertheless, i am not a total novice and, despite my shortcomings, i do know i'm making their day a hellava lot easier.

    but ... i'm only human, and i do tend to make even more mistakes when i know i'm going to get slammed no matter what i do. after awhile, no matter how tough you are, it's difficult to concentrate and do everything the nurse wants when you know she's hostile and looking for any opportunity to jump on your case ... even when you do things right.

    i actually don't need nor do i expect praise or reassurance but, like a lot of people, i don't tend do well when i getting slammed all the time either.

    i can't wait to get out of there and let them get back to doing all the work. thankfully, my days of slave labor will soon be over. i hope they got their jollies because if this is how they make themselves feel better or whatever it is ... good riddance.

    :typing

    [font="comic sans ms"]i'm so sorry for what you are going through :icon_hug: . i've been through this and just got fed up last week-out of frustration (almost ready to quit on the spot) blurted out something like "...well i guess we're just going to have to face the fact that i'm just incompetent at nursing...i can never see myself becoming as perfect as all of you...i think i'll start investigating another career...maybe i can put my 4.0 biology degree to good use, chuck the nursing degree, and become a doctor...what do you think...?" it sure shut them up and i haven't heard one critism in a whole week. maybe your answer is to try your own form of the passive-aggresive thing. good luck
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from loricatus
    [font="comic sans ms"] i've been through this and just got fed up last week-out of frustration (almost ready to quit on the spot) blurted out something like "...well i guess we're just going to have to face the fact that i'm just incompetent at nursing...i can never see myself becoming as perfect as all of you...
    speaking of perfection ...

    the funny thing is, my preceptor has made some mistakes herself. she jumped on me for not giving patients meds before dialysis which, would have gotten dialyzed out. when i showed the mar to the dialysis nurse, she agree with me that the meds should have been held.

    and, when i reported one patient's left sided chest pain which was radiating to the back ... i was told not to be concerned since the heart is on the right side, and that it was just gas pain.

    ok ... i didn't know that human anatomy had changed

    make no mistake ... i've done some really stupid things. but no one is perfect, including her.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Nov 30, '06
  12. by   GardenDove
    An MI can manifest in a multitide of ways anyways, even with no pain.
  13. by   Sheri257
    Quote from GardenDove
    An MI can manifest in a multitide of ways anyways, even with no pain.
    Yes, I know. And yes, it can even radiate to the right side. And, yes it can just be gas pain.

    BUT ... she was also SOB, respirations were 30 and above with constant dyspnea. She did not look good. And left sided CP with pain radiating to the back is a classic sign ... at least that's what they taught me in school.

    I personally wanted to order a stat EKG to rule it out but ... what do I know. The heart, afterall, is on the right side ...

    Sorry but ... I thought that's the kind of stuff we're supposed to be looking out for. I guess we're supposed to wait until they code.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Nov 30, '06

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