What did nursing school do to you? - page 5

Did it drive you crazy? What types of feelings did you have? Today was the last clinical day of the semester, and I have so many different emotions. I'm scared, anxious, worried, somewhat... Read More

  1. by   nurseangel47
    Made me forget about mundane things like housework, ironing, other time consuming "delights" of life, induced insomnia on preclinical nights, always.
    Contributed to a general distain for anything not nursing in nature for the three years it took to obtain my associate's degree.
    Helped a rather precarious marriage before school to finally smolder in the ashes of divorce and raising two little ones alone.
    Irritrievable prenursing figure....too much late night munching assisting the pretest jitters of all nighters studying....
    beginnings of DM II due to above...
    and finally.....*(drumroll....) a nervous breakdown beginning of second year!
    Made it, though, thanks to the help of modern medications! LOL
    Xanax should be prescribed upon leaving the hospital for all new moms, and all prenursing students....
  2. by   CrufflerJJ
    Quote from moongirl
    ewww. not together.. right?? they sound good but not as a mixture!!!!!
    How about with nice smoky (Islay type) Scotch + Trader Joe's Thai spiced peanuts. Heat from the peanuts (it includes dried kaffir lime leaves, lemongrass, and dried chile peppers - yum, yum), combined with the icy smokiness of the Scotch. :flamesonb
  3. by   tattooednursie
    I have 8 months left in the 2 year LVN program. I'll tell you that anything makes me cry anymore lol Its very stressful. It will all be worth it in the end though! I've been sick alot, and I get alot of headaches as well as female problems!!! Best of luck to you.
  4. by   alexillytom
    Negatives:
    1. WEIGHT GAIN
    2. Majorly upped my stress level
    3. Huge, huge drop in income ---> negative effect on my credit rating
    4. Total lack of interest in sex. (who has the time?)
    5. Loss of contact with my pre-nursing best friend. We try but.....
    6. Introduced me to the unbending, all-knowing, GOD-complex, worship me
    attitudes of some instructors and nurses. I never heard of nurses eating their
    young before starting school but now, I get it.
    7. Learning to live in a not so clean house.
    8. Clinical instructor from the first half of my second semester made me
    feel totally incompetent and suggested I pursue another profession. What
    a demoralizing experience. She didn't like me from the first day of clinical.
    I didn't give her the accepted reason for attending nursing school. "It was a
    calling from GOD....."

    Positives:
    1. I know some stuff!!!!
    2. First semester clinical instructor told me that I'm going to be a great
    nurse but I didn't believe her. Clinical instructor from the second half
    of the second semester told me that I'm going to be a great nurse and the
    nurses on the floor wanted to hire me. I still didn't believe. My clinical
    instructors from third semester told me that I'm going to be a great nurse
    and NOW I BELIEVE!!! I impressed myself this semester. My confidence level
    is pretty high right now.
    3. Showed me how WONDERFUL my kids are. They never complain. They TRY to
    let me study. They ask me questions about MY DAY. They are proud of me.
    4. Made me realize that I would be a pretty darn good psych nurse. I'm not sure
    if that's where I'll end up but I felt really helpful at the psych facility. Although,
    the nurses there were some of the worst I've ever seen. Really, they were like
    something from a bad movie. Pretty scary.
    5. I learned that I'm made of some tough stuff and that the ghosts from my past
    have no impact on my future.
    6. I lost almost all of the weight I gained during the first two semesters during the
    summer break so, nursing school reinforced the importance of working out
    regularly. Now, I'm on winter break so I can up my workout routine.
    7. I've made some wonderful friends.
    8. Nursing school has taught me that I don't have to have an A. If I study hard, and
    know the material, but still get a B, oh well. I finished this semester with a B+ and
    I'm happy.
  5. by   moongirl
    Quote from CrufflerJJ
    How about with nice smoky (Islay type) Scotch + Trader Joe's Thai spiced peanuts. Heat from the peanuts (it includes dried kaffir lime leaves, lemongrass, and dried chile peppers - yum, yum), combined with the icy smokiness of the Scotch. :flamesonb
    that will work- but not Cheetos and Burbon- thats pretty rough!
    Since I started nursing school I have noticed I have an increased tolerance to additional servings of icy margaritas.
  6. by   miracle1986
    I think it all depends on the instrustors and support one has at home.I have strick, hard, tricky instructors and absolutely no support at home....in fact , there are bets that i won't finish the R.N. program ! That gives me even more incentive to do it !!!!!:spin:
    I love it all--but that does not make it easy
  7. by   Retired R.N.
    Nursing school taught me the value of time management. I had too few dollars and not enough spare hours to earn more. I discovered that I could earn more in tips as a waitress at a popular local nightclub than our charge nurses were earning in their salary. All I had to do as a waitress was smile sweetly, remember who got the Scotch and who got the bourbon, and not slop the beer in someone's lap.

  8. by   miracle1986
    Retired R.N.----oh my gosh.....oh my gosh.
  9. by   samaletta
    Thanks for all the input!! It's somewhat reassuring to know that I'm not the only one out there that has had these feelings. I talked to my mother about it and she told me "Sami that's why not everyone can be an RN". I feel like I could cry over little things and I feel so much LESS confident than I did during the 1st 2 years of the program. The first 2 years I had straight A's, now I have B's - which I don't care, but deep down it's like.... my best isn't good enough now. I put my ALL into this, and it's draining. very draining. And then I wonder if I will be the competent Nurse I imagined myself being 2 years ago. But I guess these feelings are kind of normal. Thanks again for all of the input.
  10. by   doingourbest
    What nursing school did for me:

    1. Gave me a pulse of 250+ for the duration.
    2. Gave me a BP of 290+/150+.
    3. Made my children feel like orphans.
    4. Gave me a respectable job in which I can help people and earn almost enough money to pay my bills.(Still can't afford to take my kids to the doctor or dentist)

    And by the way, my pulse and BP went back to normal once school was over.
  11. by   doingourbest
    Reading everyone's answer to this is making my cry. I wish you all the best life has to offer. You deserve it.
  12. by   TrudyRN
    It's been a long time and I don't recall so clearly, I guess. I do remember feeling very scared and nervous at times.

    I did not have money worries, as living in the dorm at the hospital was required and was free. My folks paid my tuition of $2000 total and my food bill, whatever it was. Books were included. I had use of my parents' car on occasion but did not have to keep it up, was not married, had no children.

    I paid my student loan off after graduating. I did work 1 or 2 shifts per week as a student aide after the first semester. Prior to that, I was a part-time ward clerk so always had some spending money.

    I know I was always worried about grades and getting my papers in on time. I was very shy and had a hard time socially and regret so much that I let shyness keep me from parties. It was very, very hard to deal with the floor staff, doctors, etc. in clinicals, due to shyness. I have gotten past it, LOL.
  13. by   rpric7990
    Nursing school taught me to trust God in ways I never had before. I learned that it is OK to feel fear, and God can still be there helping me in amazing ways.

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