What can I do with my BSN that Assoc. RN's can't? - page 4

I just graduated with my BSN this spring. I'm working as a PCA2/Graduate Nurse at a local hospital until I take my boards... I am taking my HESI tomorrow at the college I graduated from. This is an... Read More

  1. by   Quickbeam
    Quote from SCRN1
    ... Another thing I thought was weird is that I was taught how and had to start IVs on actual people while in nursing school while those I knew in the BSN school were only allowed to start them on the maniquins in school and never on a real human until after graduation and then do it after they worked as an RN.
    Just FYI, I started hundreds of IVs on real folks in my BSN program. It is a misconception that BSN programs are all book learning. If you want a strong clinical orientation, there are plenty of BSN programs that will challenge you.

    Not defensive. Cheerfully informative! Yup, that's me.
  2. by   jackieliz
    The hospital I work for has ASN's as diabetes educators, hospital supervisors, discharge planners and in several "middle management" type jobs at the administrative center. Experience tends to matter just as much as the letters after your name. Additionally, our credentials say "RN", no degree is named.
  3. by   llg
    Quote from jackieliz
    The hospital I work for has ASN's as diabetes educators, hospital supervisors, discharge planners and in several "middle management" type jobs at the administrative center. Experience tends to matter just as much as the letters after your name. Additionally, our credentials say "RN", no degree is named.
    I am sure that what you say is true about your particular hospital. But on a national level, the trend is that an increasing number of employers would "prefer" to have most of those positions filled with nurses with a BSN or higher. They will fill those positions with nurses without BSN's if there are not many well-qualified BSN's in the area interested in the job -- but in communities in which BSN's (who also have the right job experience) are available, the BSN's are usually given a preference.

    Also, people in school now in school or recently out of school and who are looking ahead to another 20, 30, or 40 years of nursing practice ahead of them should be thinking about what employee preferences will be in the future -- not at what someone was able to do 5 years ago or even now. Their career will be mostly in the future (not the past or present) and they need to prepare for that. If you look at the historical trends, it indicates that nurses with more advanced education will have more job opportunities than those who don't -- and those opportunities will be in clincial positions as well as management and educational ones.

    And just because that trend has not held true for a few individuals in the past (or present) in a few jobs, that doesn't negate the trend. Why do you think all those nurses with ADN's and diplomas are going back to school? -- because they see that the jobs that they can get now will not keep them happy forever. They are smart and taking care of their futures.

    llg
  4. by   TexasPoodleMix
    Quote from llg
    Why do you think all those nurses with ADN's and diplomas are going back to school? -- because they see that the jobs that they can get now will not keep them happy forever. They are smart and taking care of their futures.

    llg
    so say i graduate in 2007ish with an ADN (already have a BS in another field, not feasible to go back right now) do you think it is possible for me to get a job as a floor nurse ? (with an adn)
  5. by   SCRN1
    Quote from TexasPoodleMix
    so say i graduate in 2007ish with an ADN (already have a BS in another field, not feasible to go back right now) do you think it is possible for me to get a job as a floor nurse ? (with an adn)
    Of course! I have an ADN and most of the other floor nurses I work with have that degree also.
  6. by   nursemike
    Quote from TexasPoodleMix
    so say i graduate in 2007ish with an ADN (already have a BS in another field, not feasible to go back right now) do you think it is possible for me to get a job as a floor nurse ? (with an adn)
    West Virginia University offers a fast-track BSN (I think I heard 18 months) for people who already have a BS. Without implying that my home state is backward or anything, if we're doing it, there are probably other places that are doing it. Might be worth checking around, though I surely hope an ADN won't be obsolete anytime soon.
  7. by   SandyB
    In California with a BSN I can teach clinicals in the community colleges LVN or ADN and in the vocational schools I can teach everything...
    school nursing (awesome hours and time off
    Public Health Nursing for different counties
    and of course, management..but don't just think hospital, think:
    Hospice
    Insurance companies
    and the list goes on.

    Education is never wasted......
  8. by   llg
    Quote from TexasPoodleMix
    so say i graduate in 2007ish with an ADN (already have a BS in another field, not feasible to go back right now) do you think it is possible for me to get a job as a floor nurse ? (with an adn)

    Definitely. The ADN is not going away in the forseeable future. A floor nurse is the basic, entry-level job in nursing and that is what the ADN prepares you to do. Most ADN programs do a great job of preparing a basic, entry-level floor nurse.

    My point is that after a few years (or several years) as a floor nurse, you may be interested in other types of nursing jobs. At that point in your future, you will almost certainly find that more opportunities will be available for you if you have a higher degree.

    Best wishes for a long and satisfying nursing career,
    llg
  9. by   Agnus
    You sound disappointed as though you expected more as a new grad. A new grad is a new grad. When we start out we are pretty equal on the skills level and on the level of cordinating every thing an making sense of the big picture.

    In time your additional education will start to have an effect on your practice. Keep in mind many of your non nursing friends who are starting out with a Bachelor degree are NOT making anything close to what you are to start. In time you will begin to see the value of your additional education. Congrats.
  10. by   RoaminHankRN
    We should do away with all the extra letters at the end of your name on the badge and stick with RN. Do you really think a patient, physician or other healthcare provider cares if you are BSN, ADN or what have you?

    Also, there are many in nursing management that got there with an ADN. Granted working toward a BSN is important to further your management track but not having a BSN does not mean one is not capable to manage or lead. Nowadays many job postings say BSN preferred.
  11. by   TexasPoodleMix
    Quote from RoaminHankRN
    Also, there are many in nursing management that got there with an ADN. .
    My MIL had a management position (no idea on the specifics) and she has an ADN. She was getting paid quite well .
  12. by   Sheri257
    Quote from llg
    I am sure that what you say is true about your particular hospital. But on a national level, the trend is that an increasing number of employers would "prefer" to have most of those positions filled with nurses with a BSN or higher. They will fill those positions with nurses without BSN's if there are not many well-qualified BSN's in the area interested in the job -- but in communities in which BSN's (who also have the right job experience) are available, the BSN's are usually given a preference.

    Also, people in school now in school or recently out of school and who are looking ahead to another 20, 30, or 40 years of nursing practice ahead of them should be thinking about what employee preferences will be in the future -- not at what someone was able to do 5 years ago or even now. Their career will be mostly in the future (not the past or present) and they need to prepare for that. If you look at the historical trends, it indicates that nurses with more advanced education will have more job opportunities than those who don't -- and those opportunities will be in clincial positions as well as management and educational ones.

    And just because that trend has not held true for a few individuals in the past (or present) in a few jobs, that doesn't negate the trend. Why do you think all those nurses with ADN's and diplomas are going back to school? -- because they see that the jobs that they can get now will not keep them happy forever. They are smart and taking care of their futures.

    llg
    Nah ... I'm all for getting a BSN. But I think you're wrong on several counts. It's not the simple.

    The nursing shortage is growing by more than 10,000 additional vacant postions per year and will increase at an even higher rate, mostly because of aging baby boomers. In the next 16 years, the shortage will be 800,000 vacant positions nationwide, even worse after that.

    If you take California as an example (where we have 35 million people and the shortage is already acute) there are more than 70 ADN programs and only 20 BSN programs. Even if you assume that employers truly have a preference for BSNs, now or in the future (which is doubtful), they don't and won't have much of a choice. You'd have to shut down every hospital in the state. They don't have enough nurses now, and they certainly won't in the future, even with the existing system where ADN programs far outnumber BSN programs.

    Employers are also in the education business, since they do pay for staff (like LVNs, CNAs etc.) to become RNs. Of the six nursing programs within a 60 mile radius of where I live, two are BSNs. One is a good program, but costs a fortune ($30,000). The other is a more affordable state university, but the NCLEX pass rate barely meets the state's minimum 70 percent requirement, 15 percent below the state and national average (not to mention much lower than the surrounding ADN programs, which are even cheaper than the state BSN program).

    Because of these factors, some employers actually prefer the ADN programs in this area because, obviously, they prefer paying less, and they like paying for a school that has higher NCLEX pass rates. It's risky to pay more for a BSN program where the grads have less of a chance passing the NCLEX. And, for those people who aren't LVNs, etc. some employers do prefer the ADN programs because they do obtain more clinical experience, since the above mentioned state BSN program is accelerated.

    The fact is: employers know which schools turn out well trained grads, and which schools don't. A title doesn't always mean as much as cost, NCLEX pass rates, clinicals, etc. The individual school's track record can count a lot more.

    However, I do think a BSN is a good idea in general. And if you're talking about getting a BSN so you can go on to CRNA school and things like that then, yeah, they will have better job opportunties. But if we're only talking about BSNs versus ADNs ... ADNs will probably do just as well as BSNs in the future, if that's as far as they want to go.

    I know plenty of ADNs who work in management positions and the like. Unless there's state mandated educational requirements for certain jobs, it really doesn't matter. Work experience often counts more than anything else.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jun 17, '04
  13. by   mawbellRn2Bn04
    Well I just have to reply to the post that said the hospitals prefer BSN to ASN. From what I have seen here in E. TN the hospitals could care less and considering that 80% of the RN work force in the US are ADN holding nurses, a hospital in shortage would be shooting themselves in the foot to require more than an ADN. Its makes no difference what your degree is on that floor. As a new ASN graduate on the operating room floor I am working side by side with a new BSN graduate training to do the very same thing. Long term, a BSN is gonna help her to do more if she wants. And after I am done with my perioperative trianing, I am thinking of going to ETSU and doing a once amonth ASN to BSN program because long term, I would like to get my CRNA. With that said Congratulations on your BSN and hang in there. Unfortunately the hospitals around here only give more pay based on experience and not degree for the BSN and ASN's. take care Tracy

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