wearing perfume to work - page 9

thought this would be interesting. what's your policy? i wear a light body splash if any.... Read More

  1. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from sjrn85
    She was medicated with Ativan...not an asthma drug, but a mild tranquilizer, giving the impression that her response was "all in her head."
    I know that, I was being sarcastic

    I'm a pharmacy tech by the way ;-)
  2. by   TechieNurse
    gr8rnpjt ~ not being confrontational here, but I have to ask you this: Even though you were a perfume that you think works well with your body chemistry and that you have received a number of compliments on, why wouldn't you refrain from wearing it at work if someone was telling you that it bothered them? Wouldn't that have been an easier solution then avoiding stairwells and bathrooms near her?
    If she continued to hound you, you would know that it had nothing to do with your fragrance and had everything to do with the 'alpha female thing'....
  3. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from TechieNurse
    gr8rnpjt ~ not being confrontational here, but I have to ask you this: Even though you were a perfume that you think works well with your body chemistry and that you have received a number of compliments on, why wouldn't you refrain from wearing it at work if someone was telling you that it bothered them? Wouldn't that have been an easier solution then avoiding stairwells and bathrooms near her?
    That would be too simple.

    Those that insist on wearing cologne or piercings or fake nails or excess jewelry...might consider examining their own motives in doing so before discussing the motives of others in complaining about it.
  4. by   gr8rnpjt
    Quote from TechieNurse
    gr8rnpjt ~ not being confrontational here, but I have to ask you this: Even though you were a perfume that you think works well with your body chemistry and that you have received a number of compliments on, why wouldn't you refrain from wearing it at work if someone was telling you that it bothered them? Wouldn't that have been an easier solution then avoiding stairwells and bathrooms near her?
    If she continued to hound you, you would know that it had nothing to do with your fragrance and had everything to do with the 'alpha female thing'....
    Simple. I will not change my life for some dimwit who does not have the sense to go after everyone up there that wore perfume. The director of the department, her manager, the secretaries, all wore perfume as well. there were 20 case managers in my department, and at least half wear perfume. This woman chose to ignore all the other scents that wafted by and attacked me and one other woman. We both do the same job (nursing/UR, Miss "sensetive" is a single, lonely dictation secretary. She also did not like that I am married, and had received unwanted and unsolicited attention at that hospital (not my choice) and she liked one of the guys that liked me, and he did not care for her.
    It was very obvious. She only picked on myself and my friend who was single and had more attention than she could handle. Not to sound vain, but it so wasn't about our perfume.
    I am a very considerate nurse, and if anyone would come up to me and tell me that my perfume is bothering them, I will definitely do something about it. Is it was, my patients, other nurses, random people in the hospital always were telling me how good I smelled. I like to dress well, and have a light pretty scent to complete my presentation.
    I never put it on at work, I put it on at home, one spray of a good perfume is all you need all day. some women make the mistake of thinking their perfume has "faded" when in reality they are used to it and while they still smell good, they put more on thinking it is not there anymore. Then they are too "heavy" and it causes problems.
    No offense taken. I clearly know what this woman was all about. I hear she is still making the other woman miserable at work ( I have moved on)
  5. by   RoxanRN
    Let's look at this from a different prospective.... When a patient says they have pain, we treat them for pain. Why? Because they say they have pain. When a person says they have a sensitivity (by whatever manifestation) to certain scents/odors, then THEY HAVE A SENSITIVITY!!! Who are we to say otherwise. We are not inside that person's body, experiencing what they are experiencing. For us as nurses to say otherwise is not only insensitive, but also unprofessional.

    Something to think about............................................. ........
  6. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from RoxanRN2003
    Let's look at this from a different prospective.... When a patient says they have pain, we treat them for pain. Why? Because they say they have pain. When a person says they have a sensitivity (by whatever manifestation) to certain scents/odors, then THEY HAVE A SENSITIVITY!!! Who are we to say otherwise. We are not inside that person's body, experiencing what they are experiencing. For us as nurses to say otherwise is not only insensitive, but also unprofessional.

    Something to think about............................................. ........
    great analogy
  7. by   pricklypear
    I think the whole point is that unecessary scent does NOT belong in the healthcare setting. By that I mean body spray, perfume, aftershave and the like. There is no need for it, at all. I don't usually get close enough to other people to actually smell their deodorant - most deodorants don't travel that far. And if you have some problem that you feel you need to wear these things, then you should probably make an appointment with your doctor. I'm irritated by some perfumes/scents, and others smell good to me. But it's not about me, and my sensitivities, or likes and dislikes. It's about the patients, and what they should or should not be exposed to. They have no choice but to share the same space with us. Would you force them to eat something that made them nauseated? Force them to watch a certain TV show? Keep their room at 95 degrees, even though they wanted it cooler? Force them to listen to the rap station you like, even though they're offended by the language? And by the way, if your perfume is bothering people; lingering in the bathroom, hallway or stairwell, it's your first clue that you're wearing WAY TOO MUCH!!!
  8. by   gr8rnpjt
    Quote from RoxanRN2003
    Let's look at this from a different prospective.... When a patient says they have pain, we treat them for pain. Why? Because they say they have pain. When a person says they have a sensitivity (by whatever manifestation) to certain scents/odors, then THEY HAVE A SENSITIVITY!!! Who are we to say otherwise. We are not inside that person's body, experiencing what they are experiencing. For us as nurses to say otherwise is not only insensitive, but also unprofessional.

    Something to think about............................................. ........
    Oh, Ok so all drug seekers really have pain!!!Come on!!!
  9. by   gr8rnpjt
    Quote from pricklypear
    I think the whole point is that unecessary scent does NOT belong in the healthcare setting. By that I mean body spray, perfume, aftershave and the like. There is no need for it, at all. I don't usually get close enough to other people to actually smell their deodorant - most deodorants don't travel that far. And if you have some problem that you feel you need to wear these things, then you should probably make an appointment with your doctor. I'm irritated by some perfumes/scents, and others smell good to me. But it's not about me, and my sensitivities, or likes and dislikes. It's about the patients, and what they should or should not be exposed to. They have no choice but to share the same space with us. Would you force them to eat something that made them nauseated? Force them to watch a certain TV show? Keep their room at 95 degrees, even though they wanted it cooler? Force them to listen to the rap station you like, even though they're offended by the language? And by the way, if your perfume is bothering people; lingering in the bathroom, hallway or stairwell, it's your first clue that you're wearing WAY TOO MUCH!!!

    It was not my perfume lingering, it was all the other people whom she did not confront. It was all about I was getting attention she was not getting and she attacked 2 women in an office full of women who wore perfume!!!
  10. by   mandana
    Quote from gr8rnpjt
    Oh, Ok so all drug seekers really have pain!!!Come on!!!
    Not to split hairs, but yes..I'd maintain that they do. It may or may not be a physical pain, but it's pain for sure.
  11. by   RoxanRN
    Quote from RoxanRN2003
    Let's look at this from a different prospective.... When a patient says they have pain, we treat them for pain. Why? Because they say they have pain. When a person says they have a sensitivity (by whatever manifestation) to certain scents/odors, then THEY HAVE A SENSITIVITY!!! Who are we to say otherwise. We are not inside that person's body, experiencing what they are experiencing. For us as nurses to say otherwise is not only insensitive, but also unprofessional.

    Something to think about............................................. ........

    Quote from gr8rnpjt
    Oh, Ok so all drug seekers really have pain!!!Come on!!!
    You get the point :angryfire
  12. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from RoxanRN2003
    You get the point :angryfire

    No need to stress. When someone doesn't agree with you or just likes to take the contrary side.................it won't happen.

    1. They cannot understand your point (and refuse to explore yours) which is fine............everyone is entitled to their own opinions/beliefs

    2. Or, they take pleasure in seeing you stressed



    To sum the OP,...............there were more in favor or NOT wearing scents to work versus wearing. Ta da............the end :chuckle

    J/K
  13. by   TechieNurse
    GR8RNPJT, could she have singled you and the other woman out because you and the other woman wore scents that bothered her and everyone else in the office that wore perfume/colonge that didn't bother her?
    My experience is that not ALL perfume/cologne trigger a response, it's the type (e.g. Channel) and/or the amount worn.

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