wearing perfume to work - page 11

thought this would be interesting. what's your policy? i wear a light body splash if any.... Read More

  1. by   rambisisking
    Man, I give up, you didn't either understand or accept anything I said.
  2. by   rambisisking
    Instead of doing a study on how sensitive some people are to sents, maybe we should do a study on how some people are insensitive to other people.
  3. by   Jerico
    Quote from rambisisking
    AMEN INDY....
    ...If something you are doing is really hurting someone else...
    .
    I could not AGREE more. HOWEVER this sensitivity thing is being SOOOO overplayed by anyone who gets their panties in a twist, we haven't a CLUE who is truly sensitive and to make rules that affect EVERYONE in sight - just because of a very FEW seems inflexible and INSENSITIVE to others.

    Take for instance:

    A man comes into the ED. He is homeless, has not had a BATH in three months. Never bathes, never changes underwear, never changes socks.

    When he takes off his shoes, the ENTIRE department STINKS. STINKS. I MEAN like something crawled into a HOLE and DIED. Something you would swear had DIED three weeks ago. (Honest to heavens this has happened).

    NOW. Everyone in the ED is nearing the vomit stage: patients, doctors, nurses. Bags are placed over this man's feet in an attempt to get rid of the odor.

    Enter someone with a spray bathroom deodorizer.

    The ONE lady in Room A SAYS she is "sensitive" to perfumes. Complains of the smell of the man's feet "it is making her want to vomit"...

    There is no MEDICAL fact or RECORD this woman has ever reacted to perfumes or odors in a life threatening way.

    Do we MAKE 17 ED personnel SUFFER for four hours and NOT let the spraying BEGIN JUST because this woman in Room A SAYS she is sensitive to perfumes (the spray IS a form of perfume is it not?).

    OR do we say the benefit of the MASSES outweighs the ONE person who MAY or MAY not be sensitive?

    What I am saying is that unless someone is gonna DIE from smelling perfume - I don't think nurses should be UNILATERALLY restricted from wearing it TASTEFULLY.
  4. by   caroladybelle
    You are comparing apples to oranges.

    There is a difference:

    Wearing perfume is not necessary nor an important asset to ones job performance. Being in a tolerable environment is.

    And for that matter, if the reek from the patient is that bad, spraying a chemical "deodorizing" spray, generally will not eliminate the odor nor does it improve the smell, but merely adds another reeking odor to the air. The area should be aired out, air properly filtered, etc.

    In most hospitals that I work in, Deodorizing sprays are not permitted because they are contraindicted in health care populations. They have been long known to trigger bad reactions in many individuals.
  5. by   rambisisking
    Jerico- you are still giving yourself power over judgements that you may not make. How do you know? I mean really, how do you know? You must be privy to some spiritual information that the rest of us do not have axcess to. How could it possibly be up to your judgement what someone else is feeling? See that's the part that I just cannot get past,If you have pain and you voice it, does anyone else's opinion effect whether you have that pain or not?Well of course it doesn't, It's absurd to even entertain the thought that it could. And as for your statement of " Unless somebody is going to die from smelling perfume"...again I say, How do you know? How can you judge what will happen and does someone have to die...I mean making people sick, unable to breathe, headache and nausia...that's not enough of a reason, they must die to prove valitity to you?
    You have a very short cord of tolerance with others it seems by your statements.
    Sometimes, infact alot of times, life has a way of putting us in positions of having to experience things before we realize the truth in them. Sometimes we are in positions where we have to be the person who we have been intolerant of, it's called Karma. You dont' have to believe in it. It will happen whether you do or not, but it's something to think about. It's also called learning the hard way, I implore you to think about this and about the fact that YOUR opinion about what is happening to someone is in no way connected to the reality of their feeling.
  6. by   Jerico
    I hear what you are saying.
    However, I think the frustration should be with those who feign "sensitivity" which causes many of us nurses (and others) to wonder...

    Johnny calls wolf too much, no one begins to listen.

    Be angry at the ones who cry wolf.

    You state I compare apples to organges.

    Perhaps a better example, OK..?

    Another example: hairspray.
    How come no one complains of hairspray? How come we nurses don't have to STOP using hairspray? Mousse? Hairgel? Deodorant?
    There is just as much fragrance in those products as perfume.

    But if one complained about hairspray, one may have to stop using it.

    Hmmmm.

    I think a compromise should be reached. INSTEAD of unilaterally saying "NO PERFUME" it would be more adventageous to say "Moderate".

    That is tolerant for ALL, and certainly a more intelligent approach.

    Herd mentality seldom works.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from rambisisking
    Instead of doing a study on how sensitive some people are to sents, maybe we should do a study on how some people are insensitive to other people.
    Yes and let's begin here. I am asking everyone please be polite in this heated topic. Thank you.

    deb
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from Jerico
    I hear what you are saying.
    However, I think the frustration should be with those who feign "sensitivity" which causes many of us nurses (and others) to wonder...

    Johnny calls wolf too much, no one begins to listen.

    Be angry at the ones who cry wolf.

    You state I compare apples to organges.

    Perhaps a better example, OK..?

    Another example: hairspray.
    How come no one complains of hairspray? How come we nurses don't have to STOP using hairspray? Mousse? Hairgel? Deodorant?
    There is just as much fragrance in those products as perfume.

    But if one complained about hairspray, one may have to stop using it.

    Hmmmm.

    I think a compromise should be reached. INSTEAD of unilaterally saying "NO PERFUME" it would be more adventageous to say "Moderate".

    That is tolerant for ALL, and certainly a more intelligent approach.

    Herd mentality seldom works.
    Good points all.

    It kind of like the drug seeking population. They are out there and make people with legitmate pain unbelieved and not taken seriously.

    Most of those products aren't designed to give off scents like perfume. But I admit you have a good point. And yes, some people are sensitive to those, though they don't complain as often. And you do have to draw the line somewhere. I say drawing the line at not wearing perfume or spraying deoderizing spray around an emergency room is an equally intelligent approach.

    I think in this matter most of us take sides and are going to have to agree to disagree because we're not going to change our minds.
  9. by   Tweety
    Quote from caroladybelle
    Wearing perfume is not necessary nor an important asset to ones job performance. Being in a tolerable environment is.

    And for that matter, if the reek from the patient is that bad, spraying a chemical "deodorizing" spray, generally will not eliminate the odor nor does it improve the smell, but merely adds another reeking odor to the air. The area should be aired out, air properly filtered, etc.
    I agree, you can't convince me perfume is necessary to perform a job.


    I've smelled some very noxious feet from homeless people before, so I know what this nurse is saying.

    But if as this nurse says, people suffer for hours, then there's definately some problem with the ventilation and the bathing technique.
  10. by   Jerico
    Quote from Tweety
    ....I've smelled some very noxious feet from homeless people before, so I know what this nurse is saying.
    ...But if as this nurse says, people suffer for hours, then there's definately some problem with the ventilation and the bathing technique.
    Well, after an hour and a half, maintenance finally showed up with one of those room ventilators, but by then the whole ER was saturated. He was vomiting (drunk, too) too. It was a mess.

    Bathing technique? We didn't have TIME to bathe anyone in the ER. Saddest ER I've ever seen.

    Another reason I left. No patient care. Just keep them breathing/heart beating/not kill themselves.

    We though a dead HORSE was in the room. I am not exaggerating. People were LEAVING to go outside for some FRESH air to breathe!

    You know how the nose has memory? Well, all of us were "smelling" it for the rest of the 12 hour shift. It was just awful.
  11. by   Jerico
    Quote from rambisisking
    ...
    You have a very short cord of tolerance with others it seems by your statements...
    YES I have a short cord of tolerance: I have a short cord of tolerance with others that overstate their sensitivity for whatever reason...attention usually. They want to feel special.

    EVERYONE likes to feel special...but to cry wolf? Overstate conditions? That is for what I have the short cord of tolerance.

    People do it ALL the time. And it is seen ALOT in the ER.
  12. by   mandana
    Quote from Jerico
    YES I have a short cord of tolerance: I have a short cord of tolerance with others that overstate their sensitivity for whatever reason...attention usually. They want to feel special.

    EVERYONE likes to feel special...but to cry wolf? Overstate conditions? That is for what I have the short cord of tolerance.

    People do it ALL the time. And it is seen ALOT in the ER.
    Yikes, I fear you may have entered the wrong profession. Not the best career for someone short on tolerance, especially when that lack of tolerance manifests itself for those who overstate conditions and cry wolf!!!!

    Seriously, yikes.

    Amanda
  13. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from Jerico

    You state I compare apples to organges.

    Perhaps a better example, OK..?

    Another example: hairspray.
    How come no one complains of hairspray? How come we nurses don't have to STOP using hairspray? Mousse? Hairgel? Deodorant?
    There is just as much fragrance in those products as perfume.

    But if one complained about hairspray, one may have to stop using it.
    You are still comparing apples to oranges.

    Hairspray is highly unessential to patient care, frequently a hindrance.

    Actually, in Onco/BMT, most of us forgo hairspray, etc. for that very reason. Quite bluntly, it is not necessary to the job and tends to attract dirt and germs. I am not at work to be a fashion model, I am to be a caregiver. And as my job entails frequent mask/gown wearing, makeup and hairspray would prove more of a hindrance to my job than an asset.

    Again, please examine your motives in wearing perfume. Why do you do so, other than to draw attention to yourself? Is it not the same issue that you complain about this other individual doing?

    Deodorant does come in naturally based scentless formulas. But I would have no disagreement with forgoing even that if needed for patient comfort.

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