Wearing gloves with HIV positive patients - page 2

(First time writing here) Yesterday during my clinical, I was interviewing a HIV positive patient. Half way through, the primary nurse asked me to talk with her in the hall, and when we spoke she... Read More

  1. by   dudette10
    Quote from LovingLife123
    I wear gloves in any patient room. As soon as I walk in, I put gloves on. When I touch anything. Even patient belongings. It's as much for the patient protection as it is mine.
    Universal precautions--hand hygiene always and wearing gloves when you expect to come in contact with bodily fluids.

    No, I don't put on gloves as soon as I walk in, regardless of what I plan to do in there. It's not necessary. I put on gloves when I'm ready to do something that will potentially expose me to bodily fluids.
  2. by   ICUman
    Wearing gloves will not make a patient "feel like crap" or feel bad about themselves. It is an everyday common practice in the hospital.

    Standard precautions should be observed for every patient interaction necessitating touch, which includes wearing gloves.

    Instructing a student to wear gloves does not make the nurse paranoid or ignorant.
  3. by   ICUman
    Quote from dudette10
    Universal precautions--hand hygiene always and wearing gloves when you expect to come in contact with bodily fluids.
    Hand hygiene is for much more than potential contact with bodily fluids.
  4. by   dudette10
    Quote from ICUman
    Standard precautions should be observed for every patient interaction necessitating touch, which includes wearing gloves.
    Well, then, you misunderstand standard precautions.

    From the CDC, "Wear gloves when touching blood, body fluids, non-intact skin, mucous membranes, and contaminated items."
  5. by   Leekri
    Hospital setting. I just received the report (it's supposed to be bed side report, but they usually do it at their computers), and I entered the room just to introduce myself and did the 2 pieces of ID and checked that he was oriented and alert (which is something I do with all patients in the morning as it was taught to me by my instructor. While we were talking, I asked him about support systems since it was one of his concerns he brought up, so I guess it's like a verbal assessment? But I wasn't physically assessing him or anything)

    The primary nurse who told me to put on the gloves pointed to his chart and was pretty clear that the gloves were because of the HIV+.
  6. by   iluvivt
    Yes...that nurse was not correct .I do not wear gloves unless I will come into contact with the various bodily fluids and non=intact skin.I have to feel the quality of a vein before I cannulate it and I can't do that with gloves on.I must say though that sometimes when you are NOT expecting to come in conact with bodily fluids you do ....Surprise .....not a happy one so I do understand that if the patient is Hep C postive or HIV postive it's not a bad idea wear gloves. I have come into contact with blood on the underside of arms and not easily seen, because someone tried to start an IV before I was called.
  7. by   hherrn
    Quote from ICUman
    Wearing gloves will not make a patient "feel like crap" or feel bad about themselves. It is an everyday common practice in the hospital.

    Standard precautions should be observed for every patient interaction necessitating touch, which includes wearing gloves.

    There was no touching. It was some sort of verbal interaction.
    These were not standard precautions.
    The student was specifically instructed to utilize a different practice for a pt because the patient was HIV positive.



    Instructing a student to wear gloves does not make the nurse paranoid or ignorant.

    The fact that the mentoring nurse would interview patients presumed to be HIV negative without gloves, then don gloves to interview pts known to be HIV positive is actually a pretty good definition of ignorant.

    I am guessing you didn't read the OP.
  8. by   ICUman
    Quote from hherrn
    I am guessing you didn't read the OP.
    I read the original post just fine thank you.
  9. by   ICUman
    Quote from dudette10
    Well, then, you misunderstand standard precautions.
    Thank you for attempting to correct me but no I did not misunderstand.

    There is nothing to lose by wearing gloves. I use them for almost all patient interactions, even without contact of bodily fluid and that is perfectly fine and an added safety barrier.
  10. by   dudette10
    Quote from ICUman
    Thank you for attempting to correct me but no I did not misunderstand.

    There is nothing to lose by wearing gloves. I use them for almost all patient interactions, even without contact of bodily fluid and that is perfectly fine and an added safety barrier.
    With your original statement, you did indeed misunderstand standard precautions. Because you choose to wear gloves all the time doesn't mean you follow SUPER DUPER standard precautions; it simply means you wear them when it's not required.
  11. by   ICUman
    Quote from dudette10
    With your original statement, you did indeed misunderstand standard precautions. Because you choose to wear gloves all the time doesn't mean you follow SUPER DUPER standard precautions; it simply means you wear them when it's not required.
    Show me where you claim I misunderstood standard precautions.
  12. by   kaylee.
    Quote from ICUman
    Thank you for attempting to correct me but no I did not misunderstand.

    There is nothing to lose by wearing gloves. I use them for almost all patient interactions, even without contact of bodily fluid and that is perfectly fine and an added safety barrier.
    You ask how you misunderstand standard precautions? Well you have described the precautions you take and they are not the "standard".

    Do you wear an N95 mask when entering all patient rooms in the chance that they are tb+?

    Im not saying your gloving practice is extreme or super wierd, just suggesting that it is not the standard.

    You wear for all care, even when statistically an interaction has a zero chance of fluid exposure. This is not a scientifically safer approach, it just makes you feel safer. So while its fine, its not scientifically "safer".

    You think there is nothing to lose wearing gloves, fine... But in many cases there is nothing gained by wearing them.

    You are not safer with gloves shaking an hiv pt hand than an ungloved hand.
  13. by   hherrn
    Quote from ICUman
    Thank you for attempting to correct me but no I did not misunderstand.

    There is nothing to lose by wearing gloves. I use them for almost all patient interactions, even without contact of bodily fluid and that is perfectly fine and an added safety barrier.
    The OP is not about using standard precautions.

    The OP was specifically instructed to base PPE on hiv status.

    Treating two pts differently, based on your beliefs about their hiv status, would not be "standard".

    By definition, "standard" would mean the precautions are applied universally.
    Otherwise, they might be called "Random Standards". Or "Arbitrary Standards". Separate standards based on hiv status would be called "Ignorant Standards", and should not be taught.

    If you choose to don gloves while speaking with all pts, that is certainly your choice.
    If you are in a mentoring position, you should probably explain to your student that this is an unusual practice.

    If, like the OP stated, a mentor chooses to interview non-hiv pts without gloves, but dons gloves to speak with hiv pts, that person should not be in a mentorship position.

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